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Josh McCormack

Digital Content Curator, Salud America! Josh McCormack joined Salud America! and its home base, the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health​ San Antonio, in February 2019. Graduating from Texas A&M University with a BA in English Literature, he has previously worked in journalism and publishing. Josh enjoys reading; some of his favorite authors include Stephen King, Omar El Akkad and J.R.R. Tolkien.​


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Articles by Josh McCormack

#SaludTues Tweetchat 9/3/19: Podcasts & Health Equity


podcast microphone

Podcasts are huge — there are over 750,000 shows on the market — but few focus on health equity. That's why Salud America! is lanching the Salud Talks podcast. The project will feature discussions on Latino health equity with guests who are working in the issues, both at the national and grassroots levels. To further that discussion, let’s use #SaludTues on Twitter on Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019, to discuss podcasts and how they can be one of the best tools to disseminate public health information! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “Podcasts and Health Equity” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: @DrCHHuntley, @DoctoraEdith, @latinxtherapy, Dr. Erlanger "Earl" ...

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Environmental Racism Causes People of Color to Face Compound Exposures


Environmental Racism Compound Exposure

Climate change is not and will not impact all people equally — Latinos and other minority groups shoulder the most significant threats. Worse, cities in the U.S. are illustrating that fact today, according to a recent study from the University of Michigan. Their research shows that climate change subjects minority communities to high risks of chemical and environmental exposures. “A key finding of this report is that environmental injustice exists across Michigan, with residents of low-income and minority communities disproportionately burdened by environmental contamination and health risks—just as we saw in Flint,” Paul Mohai, a professor at the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability, told Michigan News. Latinos, who already experience harm at ...

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Salud America! Launches Salud Talks Podcast


ST Blog announcement promo

Continuing its work to promote action for Latino health equity, Salud America! is launching a new project: The Salud Talks podcast. This production, which will go live on Wed., Sept. 4, expands on previously covered topic areas of Latino health and life — approaching each discussion with a holistic mindset. Episodes will be available every Wednesday morning on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and SoundCloud. "The Salud Talks podcast is yet another extension of Salud America!'s wide and impactful reach," said Dr. Amelie Ramirez, director of Salud America! "The podcast will give listeners insight into many of the health disparities impacting Latinos and all Americans. Furthermore, it will raise awareness of emerging solutions to those disparities." What to Expect The podcast's first ...

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Building for Holistic Health: Mental Wellness


architecture happiness building design

Architecture can influence many aspects of health, including body temperature and allergies — even our mental health. From window placement to floor design, how buildings are laid out will influence the way a person feels. More importantly, this influence can impact the day-to-day lives of people, according to Ben Channon, a U.K. architect and author of "Happy by Design." "We spend 80% of time indoors, but we give little thought to how bricks and mortar impact us physiologically," Channon told Planning, BIM & Construction Today. "Most building design prioritizes cost efficiencies and overheads, rather than paying attention to the nuances of human experience." Design, Characterless and Inexpensive Whether a room is small and cozy or large and grandiose, it can shift aspects ...

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Experts Say Climate Crisis Heat Will Make Many Urban Areas Unlivable


heat index Climate change

From New England to the Southwest, Americans are sweating through their shirts as cities across the country experience record-high temperatures. More importantly, the gauge of how hot a place feels, the heat index, has also been on the rise. The National Weather Service has sent numerous warnings to many areas, cautioning of "prolonged period of dangerously hot temperatures and high humidity." Meteorologists attribute this latest heatwave to atmospheric shifts. Worse, experts and researchers say the heatwave is only one part of the broader climate crisis problem — one that could lead to nearly 300 cities becoming uninhabitable. "Think about the most extreme summer heat you've ever experienced in your lifetime. That will become a typical summer day by the middle of this ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 8/20/19: Vaccination Access and Awareness


Vaccination acces and awareness

Vaccinations are safe and protect the public from illness outbreaks. Worse, vaccination hesitancy has been on the rise in America — as have the illnesses which those treatments prevent. Measles, for example, is on the rise. This issue stems from anti-vaccination misinformation, which has spread through the internet like wildfire. This kind of information has led parents to question and, in many cases, not use this life-saving medicine. Let’s use #SaludTues on Twitter on Tuesday, August 20, 2019, to discuss vaccinations and why they are so important for public health: WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “Vaccination Access and Awareness” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, August 20, 2019 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues ...

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1,505 Salud America! Network Members Urge for Better Climate Science!


2040 Climate Change USGS

Since taking office, the Trump administration has made numerous moves that reduce the government’s role in combating climate change – including scientific research. In April, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) announced it would no longer project climate change’s long-term impacts. This means a reduction in our understanding of the issue's full scope could occur as a result. In response, 1,505 members of the Salud America! network sent USGS Director James Reilly a message: Do not limit climate science by limiting the data researchers collect. Other individuals and groups also spoke out against this decision. A coalition of 20 Senators— including Kamala Harris and Dianne Feinstein—sent Reilly a letter that shorter projections would make it harder to gauge and ...

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30% of Gulf War Veterans Still Experience Harmful Nervous System Illness


Gulf War Illness

In August 1990, former President George H.W. Bush began Operation Desert Storm in response to the Iraqi invasion and occupation of Kuwait. More than 650,000 U.S. military personnel would join the Gulf War over the next year before this Middle Eastern conflict formally ended on July 31, 1991. Sadly, Gulf War illness continues to affect 30% of those veterans today, decades later. While there is a limited understanding of this sickness, researchers are making strides to discover how to help affected soldiers, according to Jorge M. Serrador, an associate professor at Rutgers Medical School and a scientist at the New Jersey War Related Illness and Injury Study Center. "Although it's been more than 25 years since the conflict, we still do not understand the underlying cause of these ...

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Building for Holistic Health: Indoor Air Quality


building indoor air quality

Most Latinos and Americans spend the majority of their time inside of homes, offices, restaurants, movie theaters, and other buildings. The indoor air quality in these spaces might not cross most people’s mind. However, researchers say the air inside buildings can billow into a significant health concern because poor air quality can lead to numerous short- and long-term complications — headaches, dizziness, fatigue, respiratory diseases, Toxicant‐Induced Loss of Tolerance (TILT), and even cancer. “It is important to be aware of your environment,” Dr. Claudia Miller, an environmental health professor and leader of the Hoffman TILT program at UT Health San Antonio, writes. “This is especially important for indoor air, as most people spend 90% of their time ...

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