What Latinos Should Know about the Moratorium on Evictions


What Latinos Should Know about the Moratorium on Evictions

After a federal moratorium on evictions put in place by the CDC last fall expired on July 31, 2021, the CDC has issued a new two-month moratorium through Oct. 3, 2021. This new moratorium will extend protections for the millions of families behind on rent due to the economic fallout of the pandemic, particularly Latino and Black families, who have been hit the hardest. Let’s learn what exactly the new moratorium means, what your rights as a renter are, and what happens next. What is the Moratorium on Evictions? A moratorium by law is defined as a period of time when people in debt can pause payment. In September 2020, the CDC declared a temporary moratorium on evictions to help curb the spread of COVID-19. The reasoning was that several months into the pandemic, the ...

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Zo Mpofu & Dakisha Wesley: Forging Alliances to Declare Racism a Public Health and Safety Crisis


Zo Mpofu and DK Wesley Forge Alliances to Declare Racism a Public Health and Safety Crisis

Zo Mpofu believes protecting the health of mothers and babies in childbirth is a moral responsibility. That is why it alarmed Mpofu, a human services program consultant for Buncombe County Department of Health and Human Services in North Carolina, that local black women are 3.8 times more likely to lose their baby in the first year of life than white women. Also, Dakisha “DK” Wesley, assistant county manager in Buncombe County, worried that black people accounted for 25% of the jailed population, despite being 6.3% of the local population. Mpofu and Wesley believe these are the results of structural racism. That is why these government employees collaborated with cross-sector partners to urge Buncombe County leaders to pass three resolutions declaring racism a public ...

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Giselle Rincon: A Venezuelan Immigrant Sending Help to her Home Country


Giselle Rincon: A Venezuelan Immigrant Sending Help to her Home Country

When Giselle Rincon decided to start a nonprofit to help immigrants and offer humanitarian aid to her home country, she had no idea where to start with her background in teaching. “None of us have a nonprofit background, no clue how to begin a nonprofit, how to manage it. We have been learning every day, how to do it and talking to people, asking for consultants, asking for advice,” Rincon said. In 2014, Rincon started Venezuela’s Voice in Oregon along with a group of Venezuelan immigrants in the Portland, Oregon area. She and her team of eight team members work entirely pro-bono and volunteer their time outside of their full-time jobs. Through connecting with other nonprofit leaders and members in the Latino community, Rincon has taught herself how to run her growing ...

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Report: Many Latino Children Live in Poverty, Even in the ‘Healthiest’ Counties


2021 County Health Rankings Show High Poverty Rates for Latino & Black Children

Poverty disproportionately impacts Latinos and other people of color. Child poverty rates are more than twice as high for U.S. Latino children (23.7%) than White children (8.9%), according to a Salud America! research review. Hardships stemming from poverty, like difficulty meeting basic needs for food, medicine, housing, and transportation, also lead to worse health and life outcomes. We know that poverty hurts poor neighborhoods and counties that are predominately non-white and low-income. However, did you know that even in the healthiest counties, children of color still experience poverty at often twice the rate of white children? “Nearly 1 in 10 children are living in poverty in the nation’s healthiest counties and children of color, particularly Black, Hispanic ...

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A New Normal: Diverse, Equitable, and Inclusive


A New Normal: Diverse, Equitable, and Inclusive

As America reopens cautiously and as more people are vaccinated against COVID-19, the National Urban League is exploring what a “new normal” really means. Why? Because the pandemic worsened deep-rooted inequities and pre-existing health disparities, causing Black, Latino, and other people of color to suffer high burdens of sickness and death. So they reached out to public health professionals, civil rights leaders, elected officials, and community advocates to hear their visions for a new normal for their 45th annual State of Black America® report on racial equity in America. The new report contains 23 essays urging a new normal that is diverse, equitable, and inclusive. We are excited to announce that Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, director of Salud America! at UT Health San ...

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What Latino Parents Should Know about the New Child Tax Credit


What Latino Parents Should Know about the New Child Tax Credit

This week, millions of working families in the U.S. will receive the first payment from the expanded child tax credit implemented by the Biden Administration. “The Child Tax Credit in the American Rescue Plan provides the largest Child Tax Credit ever and historic relief to the most working families ever – and most families will automatically receive monthly payments without having to take any action,” according to the White House website. Although the IRS and banks have been prepping for the credit for months, there is still some confusion on what the tax credit is and who qualifies for it. Here’s what Latino parents need to know about the new child tax credit that will be deposited on July 15, 2021. What is the child tax credit? In March 2021, President Biden signed ...

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Younger Latinos More Likely to Discuss Racism & Discrimination


Younger Latinos More Likely to Discuss Racism & Discrimination

Younger generations of Latinos are more likely than their immigrant parents to talk about issues like racism and discrimination, particularly when it comes to discrimination against Black people. “Most of our societies are fundamentally racist against darker people,” said political science professor Eduardo Gamarra, according to Carmen Sesin and Cora Cervante of NBC Latino. Generation Z, typically defined as those born between 1997 and 2015, may be more willing to confront their immigrant parents about racism because they are more racially diverse than past generations and active in social justice movements. Let’s examine how Latino youth compare to older generations, some characteristics of Generation Z, and the implications for how Latinos can tackle discrimination and ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 8/3: Breaking Down Systemic Injustices in Healthcare


Latina nurse doctor hospital worker for health equity figh healthcare injustices

A widening socioeconomic gap, racism, and discrimination contribute to inequitable distribution of healthcare and mental and physical health disparities among Latinos and other people of color. This is especially true amid COVID-19. How can we change this? Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2021, to discuss emerging strategies to promote a cohesive culture for health equity is one where everyone works individually and as a group to ensure that each person has a fair, just opportunity for health and wealth! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: Breaking Down Systemic Injustices in Healthcare TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2021 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS:  The Praxis Project (@Praxis_Project); ...

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Study: Community Environments Impact Individual Health


Community Environments Individual Health

Neighborhoods with large populations of people of color also have high rates of chronic disease, less access to healthy foods, and other systemic injustices. These factors can lead to worse health outcomes. For example, take South Texas. Researchers here have linked neighborhood characteristics to worse physical and mental health outcomes in this largely Latino, rural region, according to a recent study in the American Journal of Health Promotion. “Several neighborhood environment variables were significantly associated with mental health, [physical activity], and C-reactive protein, though estimates were small,” according to study researchers from UT Health Science Center at Houston, UT Southwestern, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, and UTHealth School of Public Health. The ...

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