Disturbing Report Estimates Impact of SNAP Cuts


SNAP, food stamps

We already know that nearly a million SNAP participants could be affected by the Trump Administration’s proposed rule to tighten SNAP work requirements. However, there’s more bad news. The vast majority of those potentially impacted reside in deep poverty and live alone, according to a new analysis released by Mathematica, which is funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. “No one in America should go hungry or live in poverty,” said Giridhar Mallya, senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, in a press release. “The findings of this analysis show that USDA’s proposed rule would disproportionately affect some of the most vulnerable SNAP participants. USDA should carefully consider whether this change promotes the ultimate goal of the SNAP ...

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Tell U.S. Gov’t: Protect SNAP!


SNAP federal food assistance protect poverty

The SNAP federal food assistance program is at risk again, and YOU CAN HELP! The Trump Administration wants to cut SNAP and could abolish food aid to 750,000 Americans who are underemployed and unemployed. This would fuel hunger and poverty among those most vulnerable, says the Food Research & Action Center. Like the public charge rule changes, SNAP cuts would hurt Latinos. These families are already less likely to seek nutrition help for fear of immigration penalties. Submit a Comment to Save SNAP! Public comments are powerful. You can make a public comment to the U.S. government on SNAP until April 2, 2019. Here's how:  1. Copy one of our Salud America! model comments below (and add a personal story or reflection): SNAP HAS VALUE I really value the SNAP ...

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17,000 Latinos Killed With Guns in California Since 1999


gun violence prevention

Nearly 17,000 Latinos were killed with guns in California from 1999 through 2016, which mirrors a national rise in gun violence, according to a new study from the Violence Policy Center. But the alarming data doesn't end there. In 2016, Latino firearm homicide victimization rate was 4.40 per 100,000. That is more than three times the white firearm homicide victimization rate of 1.45 per 100,000. The firearm homicide victimization rate jumps to 6.63 per 100,000 for Latinos ages 10-24. “For far too long, we have not had actionable data on Latino gun violence in California," said Fernando Rejón of the Urban Peace Institute. "This [Violence Policy Center] report provides us with critical information to understand the impacts and make change." California's Shocking Gun Violence ...

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10 Policies to Cut Child Poverty in Half in 10 Years



At least 9.6 million U.S. children (13%) live in poverty. Among Latino children, poverty rates are even higher (22% vs. 8% white children). These children will often lack quality education and healthcare while suffering trauma and poor health outcomes. But what if there was a way to fight poverty? Or better yet, what if you had a road map with the most effective ways to fight poverty? A new bipartisan report produced by the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), focuses on 10 big policy areas that could cut the child poverty rate by up to 50%, while at the same time increasing employment and earnings among adults living in low-income families. Researchers conducted two simulations or projections for each policy area to explore the effects that ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 3/12: Preventing Gun Violence


Gun-violence-prevention-march-tweetchat

Gun violence is a rising public health and social justice issue in the United States. In fact, gun violence is one of the top causes of premature death, killing more than 38,000 Americans and causing nearly 85,000 injuries each year, according to the CDC. The good news is that gun violence is preventable. The bad news is that not enough people see it as preventable, according to the Berkeley Media Studies Group. Mass shootings are not the largest source of gun violence, but they dominate media coverage. This can spark fear, create the idea of gun violence as inevitable, and obscure potential solutions to the epidemic. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, March 12, 2019, to share innovative strategies to create a new narrative on preventing gun violence in Latino and all ...

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Making the Case for Paid Family Leave


Pregnant Latina at work.

Paid leave reduces the use of public services, boosts employee productivity, and can help families better succeed—yet three in four Latinos are unable to take such time. Despite data that shows its benefits, there is no federal requirement to provide paid family leave. The 1993 federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), legislation most businesses follow, does not cover all workers and leave offers are unpaid. Lack of paid leave and other economic support contributes to health and economic disparities among Latinas, Latinos, and low-income families. Still, paid leave is gaining popular support, including a proposal for universal paid family leave. “If the [corporate officers and directors] gets paid leave, then the factory floor worker should also get paid leave,” ...

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The Shocking Ways the Media Portrays Immigrants


Immigrant march protest Latino media

California media portray immigrants with derogatory descriptions with regularity, while immigrant voices and healthcare are rarely covered, according to a new report by Berkeley Media Studies Group (BMSG). The BMSG report examined over 2,500 immigration articles in 2017-2018 in California: Monterey (58.8% Latino), Sacramento (23.3% Latino), Kern (53.4% Latino), and San Diego (39.1% Latino). Researchers found neutral descriptors of immigrants—“undocumented” or “unauthorized”—in most media coverage. But they also found potentially dehumanizing terms—“illegal immigrants,” “illegal aliens,” or “illegals”—in nearly every news outlet, and 13% of all articles examined. No coverage focused on the health and well-being of immigrants, either. "The hostile ...

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Opioids: A Surging Crisis in Rural America



In 2017, the CDC revealed that drug overdose fatalities are continually rising in rural communities, even surpassing rates in urban areas. Additionally, the National Farmers Union (NFU) and the American Farm Bureau Federations (AFBF) discovered that the opioid epidemic has directly impacted as many as 74% of farmers. Latinos make up roughly 23% of the agriculture industry, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics, and opioid use is on the rise in this demographic. “Opioids have been too easy to come by and too easy to become addicted to,” AFBF president Zippy Duvall said in a statement. “And because opioid addiction is a disease, it’s up to all of us to help people who suffer from it and help them find the treatment they need.” What Are Opioids? These drugs voyage through ...

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Social and Emotional Learning Leads to 64% Drop in Expulsions


A teacher at work with a class at Fall-Hamilton Elementary Source Edutopia

How can school leaders address early-life trauma among their students, improve academic and behavioral outcomes, and reduce harsh disciplinary action? Check out Nashville’s trauma-sensitive revolution. Metro Nashville Public Schools (MNPS) (23% Latino) has spent the past six years integrating trauma-informed practices, such as social and emotional learning and restorative discipline, to help students feel supported and understood, Edutopia reports. They even hired a full-time trauma-informed coordinator. “Our ability to accelerate achievement in the future is dependent on meeting the social and emotional learning needs of our students,” MNPS Director of Schools Shawn Joseph told The Tennessean. “We expect it, and the students deserve it.” The Need to Address Trauma ...

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