Anti-Immigrant Climate Can Lead to Latino Children’s Increased Anxiety


Anti-Immigrant Climate Can Lead to Latino Children’s Increased Anxiety

Latino immigrant families experience greater threats from a negative immigration climate that can lead to increased anxiety for children and difficulty paying attention in school, according to a new study from the American Psychological Association (APA). “We found substantial variability in perceived immigration threat, with immigrant parents and Latinx parents reporting significantly greater levels of immigration threat compared to nonimmigrant parents and non-Latinx parents,” according to APA. Heightened anxiety and other negative mental health issues can greatly affect Latino children in their development. Let’s explore the impact of discriminatory anti-immigrant rhetoric on Latino kids and what steps we can take to support Latino youth mental health. What Does the ...

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Latinos Are Underpaid by $288 Billion a Year, Creating a Massive Wage Gap


Latinos Are Underpaid by $288 Billion a Year, Creating a Massive Wage Gap

A wage gap between Latino and white workers is a large factor in preventing economic mobility for Latinos, according to a new study by McKinsey & Co. The gap is particularly large for Latino immigrants, who are paid far less in the same job categories as other workers. “The median wage for foreign-born Hispanics is $31,700 compared to $38,848 for those born in the U.S. For non-Latino white workers, the number goes up to $52,942,” according to NBC Latino. With low wages and fewer opportunities for fields that offer career growth, Latinos are at a disadvantage and are more likely to struggle to meet basic needs like housing, food, healthcare, and more. This, in turn, heightens their risk for disease and poor health outcomes. Let’s learn how low wages and other barriers ...

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Thanks for Speaking Up to Improve Healthcare for Latinos!


Lung Cancer Impact Latinos

Over 60 members of Salud America! endorsed our public comment to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in their request for feedback on as part of its draft Strategic Plan for 2022-2026. The draft was open for comment from Oct. 7 to Nov. 7, 2021. At Salud America!, we believe that improving healthcare by making it more accessible and culturally tailored for Latinos and other people of color will help build health equity. We believe this is possible through increasing diversity among research leaders and clinical trial participants, eliminating implicit bias in the doctor’s office, and hiring healthcare workers who can provide culturally relevant patient care. That’s why we submitted a comment from our leader, Dr. Amelie Ramirez. Dr. Amelie Ramirez’s Comment ...

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Child Tax Credits a Huge Boost for Many, But Not All, Latino Families


Child Tax Credits Boost

The expanded child tax credits are working to help families make ends meet and experience less stress, a new survey shows. As part of the American Rescue Plan, Congress expanded the child tax credit in March 2021. Since July, the IRS has been providing cash benefits to most households with children, including some of the country’s poorest families. Now, given sufficient time to study this effort, a survey by the Center for Law and Social Policy found that the enhanced child tax credit made a difference for many parents and children. Many Latinos and other families of color benefitted, but many immigrants also were left out. “Consistent and broad evidence [shows] that this policy is working as intended,” Zach Parolin, who has studied the tax credit at Columbia University’s ...

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Dr. Benjamín Aceves: What Éxito! Means to Me


Dr. Benjamín Aceves: What Éxito! Means to Me

Dr. Benjamín Aceves wasn’t sure if he wanted to pursue a PhD. He was hesitant about the commitment. He didn’t have a background in academia that many pursuing PhD programs do. But after attending the Éxito! Latino Cancer Research Leadership Training at UT Health San Antonio, Aceves grew his network of scholars and learned about resources that could help him succeed in a PhD program. “My experience at Éxito! was mind-opening for sure,” Aceves said. He went on to earn his PhD and now is a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California in San Francisco, where he researches the intersection of Latino health, chronic disease prevention, and the social determinants of health. Learning About Éxito! Aceves learned about Éxito! from his peers, who encouraged him to ...

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Dr. Mirella Díaz-Santos: Fighting Alzheimer’s in the Latino Community


Dr. Mirella Díaz-Santos: Fighting Alzheimer’s in the Latino Community

Dr. Mirella Díaz-Santos has a personal fight to end Alzheimer’s Disease. Her grandmother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s when Díaz-Santos was in school. “I needed to know more about how this ‘disease’ can change someone who you love so much. How can it change it completely?” Díaz-Santos said. Díaz-Santos is an assistant professor in residence at University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) in the department of neurology and psychiatry. She’s also the director of research of the Hispanic Neuropsychiatric Center of Excellence at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior and is involved with the Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement to bring awareness to Alzheimer’s within the Latino community. Although she’s experienced bias and discrimination ...

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Report: The Number of Latinos Killed by Police is ‘Off the Charts’


The Number of Latinos Killed by Police is ‘Off the Charts’

Between 1980 to 2019, police violence caused 30,800 deaths, according to a new report published in The Lancet. Latinos experienced the second-highest rate of police violence-driven fatalities, after Blacks. The report also found that police-violence-related deaths among people of color far outweighed the number of cases reported in the U.S. National Vital Statistics System (NVSS), which tracks fatality data. “Mounting evidence shows that deaths at the hands of the police disproportionately impact people of certain races and ethnicities, pointing to systemic racism in policing," according to the data. “Proven public health intervention strategies are needed to address these systematic biases.” The Report and Its Findings on Police Violence In 2019, the US incurred 13% of ...

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New Health Equity Language Guide Helps Fight Implicit Bias & Discrimination


New Health Equity Language Guide Helps Fight Implicit Bias & Discrimination

The AAMC Center for Health Justice and American Medical Association (AMA) co-developed a new guide on inclusive language to advance health equity. “Designed for physicians and other health care professionals, Advancing Health Equity: AMA-AAMC Guide on Language, Narrative, and Concepts provides guidance and promotes a deeper understanding of equity-focused, first-person language and why it matters,” according to the AAMC Center for Health Justice. The guide is broken down sections on language to use to promote health equity, why these narratives matter, and a glossary that defines key terminology. Using inclusive language is important for healthcare providers to ensure that they are giving culturally comprehensive care that is absent of implicit bias or discrimination, which ...

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