#SaludTues Tweetchat 8/27: How to ‘Handle With Care’ Students Exposed to Childhood Trauma


Handle With Care Tweetchat

60% of U.S. children have been exposed to violence, crime, or abuse. These kids still have to go to class, carrying a burden of stress and trauma that can interfere with their behavior and grades. And schools aren’t aware there’s an issue. Fortunately, our new “Handle With Care Action Pack,” which will be released on Aug. 26, 2019, will help police and schools start a Handle With Care program. This enables police to notify school districts when they encounter a child at a traumatic scene, so school personnel and mental health partners can provide appropriate trauma-sensitive interventions. Let’s use #SaludTues on August 27, 2019, to tweet about steps schools, communities, and healthcare professionals can start a Handle With Care program and take steps to become more ...

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Webinar: How to Start ‘Handle With Care’ to Help Students Who Suffer Trauma


Handle With Care Webinar

You are invited to join a national webinar to find out how you can start a “Handle With Care” program in your town to support students who experience violence and traumatic events. The webinar, “How to Start ‘Handle with Care’ in 5 Simple Steps,” is set for 11 a.m. ET on Aug. 26, 2019. Webinar speakers will explore: Handle With Care, a program that activates police to notify schools when they encounter children at a traumatic scene, so schools can provide trauma-sensitive support right away. The program was begun the West Virginia Center for Children’s Justice in 2013. The free Salud America! “Handle With Care Action Pack” with materials and technical assistance to help local police, school, and mental health leaders start a local Handle with Care program. ...

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Bad News: Final Rule on Public Charge Will Hurt Latino Families


Immigrant march protest Latino media

In August 2019, The Trump Administration announced its final decision regarding the public charge rule. This new regulation changes the policies used to decide whether the officials can deny an individual's citizenship application or modifications to their citizenship status if they are determined likely to become a public charge, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. The changes could considerably reduce the number of legal immigrants permitted to enter and stay in the U.S. — by making it easier to reject green card and visa applications. The new rule is bad news for public health, according to Mark Del Monte, CEO and Interim Executive Vice President of the American Academy of Pediatrics. "[We] strongly opposes the final rule issued today to expand the definition of ...

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Entire County Benefits When Census Tracts Gain Access to Transit


Transit is good for Cleveland's economy.

Transit is good for Cleveland’s economy, according to a new study. Researchers at Cleveland State University’s Center for Economic Development explored the economic impact of the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (GCRTA) over the past decade. They found it’s good for commuters, students, employers, school districts, and healthcare institutions across the region. “[The Transit Authority] is fantastic investment for taxpayers,” Obed Pasha, an assistant professor at Cleveland State and one of the study’s authors, told Streetsblog USA. “Not only does it help lift people out of poverty, it helps revitalize neighborhoods.” Transportation Woes in Cleveland Housing and transportation are important factors to get out of poverty and stay healthy. However, ...

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Implicit Bias in Stroke Care


Implicit Bias Stroke

Researchers now say Latinos and blacks experiencing a stroke are less likely to receive life-saving treatments than their white counterparts. These procedures are proven to reduce fatalities and improve patients' quality of life. Still, the systemic racism found in many healthcare systems prevents minority communities from receiving this procedure, according to new research in the American Heart Association's (AHA) Stroke.  "As disparities in stroke care, in general, have been repeatedly and consistently demonstrated, I would say the results were not surprising, though they remain frustrating and concerning," the study's lead author, Dr. Lorenzo Rinaldo—a neurosurgeon at the Mayo Clinic—said in a press release. About the Study Researchers at the Mayo Clinic examined ...

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#ElPasoChallenge: How One Latino Boy Spreads Kindness


Ruben Martinez El Paso Challenge

Last week's horrific mass shooting that targeted Latinos in an El Paso Walmart has shaken the nation. In spite of the hatred that motivated the shooting, 11-year-old Ruben Martinez in El Paso started a campaign on social media to help his community heal: The El Paso Challenge. Ruben suggested that kindness could be spread by doing 20 good deeds in honor of the victims of the shooting (the death toll has since risen to 22). It all started when Ruben told his mom, Rose Gandarilla, he was afraid to go to the store. "He was having some trouble dealing with what happened," Rose Gandarilla, Ruben's mother, told CNN. "I explained to him that we could not live in fear and that people in our community are caring and loving. I told him to try and think of something he could do to ...

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Tell USDA: Protect SNAP for Kids and Families


SNAP hungry

The attack on SNAP food aid is far from over. After staving off cuts to SNAP in 2018 and 2019, the Trump administration now wants to change the way states determine who qualifies for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). The change could take away food from 3 million people, according to health experts. "This rule would take food away from families, prevent children from getting school meals, and make it harder for states to administer food assistance," Sen. Debbie Stabenow of Michigan and the Senate Agriculture Committee told NPR. USDA is asking for public comments on SNAP until Sept. 23, 2019. How to Make a Comment to Save SNAP! 1. Copy one of our Salud America! model comments. Tweak the parts in green: SNAP HAS WORTH I am a NAMEOFPROFESSION in NAMEOFPLACE. ...

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Report: America Must Address Systematic Racism, Chronic Adversity So All Kids Can Be Healthy



Early experiences can influence a person’s entire life. Specifically, stress due to adversity, poor nutrition, and exposure to environmental toxins can lead to biological changes, which make people more likely to experience physical and mental health problems later in life. Although individual interventions are important for addressing immediate needs, they alone will not advance health equity, according to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report provides science-driven recommendations to address the social, economic, environmental, and cultural determinants of health and early adversity. They say to advance health equity, decision-makers must address the systemic root causes of poor health and chronic ...

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5 Ways to Eliminate Racism and Improve Children’s Health


kids outside outdoors grass green

Most understand that systemic racism in the healthcare industry has been a problem for a long time — it continues today. Recent research has shown that Latino and black children are more likely to die of childhood cancers than their white counterparts. Still, some medical organizations realize this gap, which has led to some progress . The American Academy of Pediatricians initiated a call to action in its recent policy statement earlier this week, which aims to reduce the impact of racism and improve health equity for all children. “While progress has been made toward racial equality, the impact of racism on communities of color is wide-reaching, systemic and complex,” Dr. Maria Trent, lead author of the policy statement, said in a press release. The document brings ...

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