Latinos: COVID-19 Disrupts Finances, Daily Life, Mental Health


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COVID-19 doesn't discriminate. But U.S. Latinos are more likely than all Americans to say the coronavirus pandemic changed their daily lives, and disrupts their mental health, finances, and jobs, according to new Pew Research Center surveys. "Latinos make up significant portions of the hospitality, construction, leisure and agricultural sectors of our labor market, and are the largest uninsured population in America," wrote Kristian Ramos, ex-spokesman for the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, for The Hill. "These workers and uninsured families are unable to telecommute, will not be paid if their jobs are lost, and likely do not have immediate access to health care." Latino Daily Life During COVID-19 Early on in the outbreak, Pew Research Center reported that a higher percentage of ...

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Coronavirus Is Hitting People in Poverty the Hardest


Coronavirus Poverty Hardest

Lack of access to healthy food, insufficient health insurance coverage, living paycheck-to-paycheck — all issues that have impacted U.S. low-income families for decades. Sadly, experts say these problems are worsening as the current novel coronavirus, COVID-19, continues to spread. This leaves the millions of men, women, and children, including the 3 million people who have recently lost their jobs, at risk of more issues than just becoming sick. Latinos—many of whom fall below the poverty line—could face significant hardship without a dedicated response from local, state, and federal leaders. "What we are seeing around the country is that we're operating and telling people to do things from the position of wealth," Rev. William Barber II, co-chair of the Poor People's ...

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Our Favorite Spanish-Language Coronavirus Resources for Latinos!


Our Favorite Spanish-Language Coronavirus Resources for Latinos

Coronavirus is locking down much of the United States, making it harder for vulnerable populations like Latinos to get information, especially those who speak Spanish. Fortunately, new resources are popping up for Spanish-language Latinos. Here are some of our favorites! CDC Promotes Spanish-Language Coronavirus Resources for Latinos About 37 million Latinos in the U.S. speak Spanish at home. But the CDC wasn't on the Spanish-language boat from the onset of coronavirus. In fact, on March 17, 2020, the website Latino Rebels shared that CDC was behind in translating its "15 Days to Slow the Spread" coronavirus recommendations. They finally posted it three days later. But now their Spanish-language website has lots of information. They cover how COVID-10 spreads, symptoms, ...

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Salud Talks Podcast Episode 23: “Keeping Calm Amid the Coronavirus”


Keeping Calm Amid the Coronavirus webpic

As COVID-19 continues to dominate headlines, all of us are experiencing new levels of stress and anxiety. With that in mind, we have something a bit different for you all. Public health workers from the Institute for Health Promotion Research join Salud Talks to share their best practices in how—in the words of another global crisis—they are keeping calm and carrying on. Check out this discussion on the Salud Talks Podcast, Episode 23, "Keeping Calm Amid the Coronavirus"!  WHAT: A #SaludTalks discussion about the current novel coronavirus outbreak and ways to stay sane. GUESTS:  Ariel Morales - Research Area Specialist Dr. Daniel C. Hughes - IHPR Assistant Professor Research Angelika Aguilar - Research Associate Stacy Cantu - Program Coordinator ...

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What the New Coronavirus Law Means for Paid Sick Leave, Family Leave


Paid leave provisions in coronavirus relief bill.

People need to stay home to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, Covid-19. However, for the 27% of the U.S. private workforce with no paid sick leave, staying home isn’t an option, particularly for the full prescribed 14-day quarantine. That’s why a form of paid sick leave and family/childcare leave are part of a new $100 billion relief law, Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which also includes nutrition aid, unemployment health insurance, and free COVID-19 testing. Trump signed the new law on March 18, 2020. It goes into effect April 2, 2020. But the new law could leave out up to 19 million workers, roughly 12% of the workforce, including many low-income Latinos, women, and other vulnerable populations, experts say. Moreover, economists estimate that three ...

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Coronavirus Highlights Inequities Impacting Latinos, Communities of Color


Coronavirus Inequities Communities of Color

Time and again, statistics go to show that communities of color, including Latinos, face a rampant and widespread lack of access to quality healthcare. In this state of emergency that the U.S. faces with the outbreak of the current novel coronavirus, COVID-19, those disadvantages are worse than ever. Disadvantaged groups currently, and will continue to, experience burdens in receiving, affording, and managing medical treatment as the virus continues to spread. “Crises such as H1N1 and COVID-19 provide a mirror for our society and the actions we take — or fail to take,” writes Dr. Richard E. Besser, the president, and chief executive of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, in the Washington Post. “Today, the United States in that mirror is one in which the risk of exposure ...

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Salud Talks Podcast Episode 22: “Children in Crisis”


Children in Crisis Welfare Assistance

Have you ever encountered a child in need? This can come in many forms, including those who need financial, food, or even foster care assistance from the state. While most might think they probably don’t know such a child, experts say that’s likely not the case. The U.S. Census Bureau reported that 51.7% of children lived in households that received some form of government assistance in 2017. Today, Dr. Kathy Fletcher, the President and CEO of Voices for Children of San Antonio, and State Representative of Texas’ 124 district, Ina Minjarez, join Salud Talks to discuss their work with children in crisis, and, what we all can do to provide our community’s children with a brighter future. Check out this discussion on the Salud Talks Podcast, Episode 22, "Children in ...

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Study: Since Trump, Latino Youth Anxiety Over Immigration Has Skyrocketed


hispanic boy teen youth child immigrant sad anxiety mental health

U.S.-born Latino youth with immigrant parents suffer "significantly increased" anxiety over immigration since the election of President Donald Trump in 2016, according to a recent study. Researchers in California and Arizona studied 397 U.S. citizen children of Latino immigrants. They compared children before the election at age 14 and after the election at age 16, to see if their concerns over immigration policy linked up to worse mental, physical health. Nearly half the youth worried "at least sometimes" about U.S. immigration policy. That included whether they'd be reported to immigration officials or their parents would be deported. Their health problems surged after the 2016 election, according to the study. "Fear and worry about the personal consequences of current U.S. ...

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