From the Big Screen to Behind the Scenes, Latinos Largely Absent in the Media


Latino representation

Despite Latinos making up over 19% of the United States population, Latinos are vastly underrepresented in the media and have been for decades. In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, we’re exploring this issue and highlighting one Latino who is working toward change. It’s About Time In summer 2023, the smash hit Blue Beetle made its debut at movie theaters nationwide. The movie, which depicts a Mexican-American superhero, is one example of how Latino representation on the big screen and behind the scenes via directors, writers, etc., is improving. While many rave about the cultural significance of the movie, one question remains: “It's 2023. What took so long?” said Edward Dennis, artist and children’s book author. Edward is right to ask this question. Latinos ...

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23 Surprising Ways to Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month


national hispanic heritage month (2)

Hispanic Heritage Month is here! This annual U.S. observance, from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, celebrates the histories, cultures, and contributions of Americans whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. We at Salud America! invite you to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month in these surprising ways. 1. Learn How Hispanic Heritage Month Began U.S. Congressmen Edward R. Roybal of Los Angeles and Henry B. Gonzales were among those who introduced legislation on the topic in 1968. President Lyndon Johnson implemented the observance as Hispanic Heritage Week that year. U.S. Rep. Esteban E. Torres of Pico Rivera proposed the observance be expanded to cover its current 30-day period. President Ronald Reagan implemented the expansion to ...

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How Hispanic Heritage Month Became a Thing



At Salud America!, we're excited to discuss Latino health during Hispanic Heritage Month! This annual U.S. observance, from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, celebrates the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. How Did Hispanic Heritage Month Start? U.S. Congressmen George E. Brown and Edward R. Roybal of Los Angeles, and Henry B. Gonzales, were among those who introduced legislation on the topic in 1968. President Lyndon Johnson implemented the observance as Hispanic Heritage Week that year. U.S. Rep. Esteban E. Torres of Pico Rivera proposed the observance be expanded to cover a 31-day period. President Ronald Reagan implemented the expansion to Hispanic Heritage Month. In ...

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CDC: Mistreatment During Maternity Care Contributes to Maternal Health Disparities


mistreatment maternity care

Despite the heaviest spending on healthcare, the United States has the highest maternal mortality rate among developed nations. Sadly, this historic trend has worsened over time and disproportionately impacts women of color. The reasons for America’s maternal health crisis is multi-faceted, but a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Vital Signs survey highlights one potential reason for this worsening health trend – mistreatment of women by healthcare workers during pregnancy and delivery care. Let’s explore the survey results and how mistreatment during maternity care affects Latinas and all women. Mistreatment During Maternity Care for Women of Color The survey, which included data from 2,402 women, found that 1 in 5 women (20%) experienced ...

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How to Show Compassion and Sensitivity While Screening for Social Needs


sensitivity screening for social needs

Many healthcare facilities require healthcare staff to complete regular sensitivity trainings on cultural competency, bedside manner, and similar topics. These trainings can help providers deliver compassionate care for diverse patients. But, as more healthcare systems go the extra mile to create a social determinants of health (SDoH) screening program to care for patients’ non-medical social needs, staff may need additional resources to guide conversations that are often deeply personal for some patients. Here’s how healthcare staff can build rapport with patients and gain confidence in discussing social needs, from housing to income. Put Yourself in the Patient’s Shoes Think about your patient’s demographics. What non-medical barriers to health do they face? What ...

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How Many Latinos Graduate College?



About half of Latinos who enroll in a four-year college do not end up graduating, according to a new analysis from ¡Excelencia in Education!  Latinos’ college graduation rate (52%) also is lower than their White peers (65%).   How can we increase Latino college graduation rates?   Let’s dive into to the numbers and explore how to close the Latino education gap, and better support Latino students.    Latino College Graduation by the Numbers  28% of Latino adults (age 25 and older) currently have an associate degree or higher, compared to 48% of non-Latino White adults.  To better understand that gap, the new analysis from ¡Excelencia in Education! highlights 4 measures that track degree completion:  1. Graduation Rate: Total percentage of students who ...

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Lack of Men of Color in Health Professions Is a National Crisis



The low number of Latinos and other men of color graduating and entering the health care professions is a national crisis, according to a new consensus statement led by the Federation of Associations of Schools of the Health Professions (FASHP).  The statement calls on local and national educational, health care, governmental, and community leaders to address this issue.    “A continued lack of awareness, marginalization and unconscious bias has led this issue to reach crisis proportions,” according to a FASHP statement. “This crisis is reflected in absolute numbers in academic institutions, in the representation of health professionals, in the elevation to leadership positions, and in health outcomes across the health professions.”   Let’s dive deeper into this ...

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Healthcare Coverage Low among Latinos, Regardless of Education


Latina going over insurance options.

Healthcare coverage rates are better among people with higher education levels. But Latinos still face some of the largest health insurance coverage gaps among racial/ethnic groups, no matter their education level, new Census research shows. “Those identifying as American Indian and Alaska Native ... or Hispanic had the highest uninsured rates at all education levels,” according to the Census Bureau. Let’s dive deeper into the differences in education level and uninsured rates by race and ethnicity, with a close look at Latinos. What Is the State of Latino Educational Attainment? 20.8% of Latinos age 25 to 64 had a bachelor's degree or higher in 2021, according to Census data. This is a lower rate than 60.8% of Asians (non-Hispanic), 41.5% of Whites (non-Hispanic), and ...

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Number of Latinas in Higher Education Continues to Grow


Latina on graduation day

As the US Latino population continues to grow, so does the representation of Latinas. Today, the Latina population has grown at a faster rate than Latino men, with 24% of Latinas making up the total population (compared to a 22% growth for Latino men). With this increase also comes more Latinas in higher education. Latinas have experienced a 52% rise in college degree attainment at Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) from 2015 to 2020, according to a new report from Excelencia in Education. In 2020, Latinas earned over 300,000 degrees at HSIs (growth of 52%) compared to 188,000 degrees earned by Latino men at HSIs (growth of 44%). Let’s dive into the growth and numbers of Latinas in higher education. Latina College Enrollment & HSIs As of Fall 2020, almost half ...

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