#SaludTues Tweetchat 2/23: Advocating for Inclusivity and Equity with People with Disabilities


Advocate for People with Disabilities

COVID-19 has highly impacted people with disabilities, especially Latinos and other people of color with disabilities. Even before COVID-19, many barriers have made life inequitable for people with disabilities, whether in the workplace, classroom, or doctor’s office. Creating inclusive spaces and policies for people with disabilities will help us reach a more equitable society. Join #SaludTues on Feb. 23, 2021, at 1:00 PM EST to tweet about how we can advocate for inclusivity and equity with people with disabilities. WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “Advocating for Inclusivity and Equity with People with Disabilities” DATE: Tuesday, Feb, 23, 2020 TIME: 1:00-2:00 p.m. EST (10:00-11:00 p.m. PST) WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica ...

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How Has COVID-19 Affected People with Disabilities?


People with disabilities affected by COVID

We know that COVID-19 can impact anyone. But some people are more likely to be infected based on their jobs, living situations, and health conditions. One of those groups is people with disabilities. People with disabilities are highly impacted by COVID-19. Latinos with disabilities are at even higher of a risk. Advocates are asking state health departments to prioritize people with disabilities to get the COVID-19 vaccine, but most states are keeping the initial phases to people over 65, regardless of chronic illness. How are people with disabilities affected by COVID-19 and how can we advocate for equity? How are People with Disabilities Impacted During COVID-19? One way that people with disabilities are impacted by COVID-19 is through potential exposure from home care ...

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Nancy Willard: Teaching Personal Empowerment and Resilience to Fight Bullying



Nancy Willard knows that the way educators are taught to handle bullying isn’t working, especially when it comes to cyberbullying. That’s why she’s written several books on bullying prevention and digital safety, including the first book ever published on cyberbullying. Willard is a former attorney and special education teacher in Veneta, Oregon who has dedicated her career to empowering students and families to stand up to bullies. She also taught those empowerment skills to her adopted Guatemalan daughter. Now she wants to help schools build more culturally relevant anti-bullying programs, especially when the COVID-19 pandemic ends and more schools return to in-person learning. A Background in Computer Law and Special Education Before working on building student ...

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Kendra Gage: Teaching Implicit Bias and Anti-Racism in the Classroom


Kendra Gage Implicit Bias

Kendra Gage starts off all her new classes addressing one obvious fact: she’s white. That’s because Gage is a professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) who teaches African American studies, focusing on the Civil Rights Movement and addressing racism in modern America. Gage believes in addressing her whiteness because she wants students to be aware of implicit bias─ stereotypes that affect our understanding and decisions about others beyond our conscious control─in the classroom. She feels it’s her role as an educator to highlight her own implicit bias and allow students to question their own biases. “My very first lecture in class, I say, ‘This is who I am. I am white.’ I mean, I can't hide behind that, so I do address it,” Gage said. That is ...

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Survey: Despite Pandemic, Many Don’t See Systemic Racism as Barrier



The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted many of the disparities impacting communities of color. Not only has COVID-19 led to a disproportionate number of deaths and severe illness among Latinos, but it has also contributed to financial struggles, homelessness, and students falling behind in school. These disparities are linked with discrimination and impact Latinos throughout their lives, according to a Salud America! research review. But despite the evidence, many Americans don’t see systemic racism as the cause of the inequity. A survey by the RAND Corporation and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) found that only 42% of respondents think that systemic racism is one of the main reasons people of color face health inequities. The majority does not believe or feel neutral ...

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Find Out If You Have Implicit Bias and What to Do Next!


implicit bias test with diverse faces in head and brain

Many people think they harbor no bias toward other people. Or they believe they know their biases and don’t act on them. But everyone has implicit bias. Implicit biases are stereotypes that affect our actions and decisions about others, beyond our conscious control. Fortunately, these biases also can be “rewired” toward more compassion for others. Download the free Salud America! Action Pack “Find Out If You Have Implicit Bias and What to Do Next.” This Action Pack will help you see if you have implicit bias, learn from others who have overcome their own implicit bias, and also encourage others to learn about implicit bias, too. GET THE ACTION PACK! Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, director of Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio, created this Action Pack. With the ...

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Study: Latino, Black Physicians Experience Racial Discrimination and Bias from Patients



More than 40% of Latino and Black resident physicians experience racial discrimination and bias from the patients they serve, according to a study published in JAMA Network Open. The experiences range from explicit racial epithets to a patient’s refusal of care. And on top of that, most physicians (84%) do not report the incidents to their leadership. “To address the issue of biased patient behavior, interventions are needed at the institutional and interpersonal levels,” according to researchers Shalila de Bourmont, Arun Burra, Sarah Nouri, et al. Racial discrimination and implicit bias must be addressed. What the JAMA Study Showed about Bias and Discrimination The study conducted by de Bourmont, Burra, Nouri et al. surveyed 232 internal medicine residents from three ...

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In New Class Oaths, Medical Students Commit to Fight Racial Injustices


University of Houston College of Medicine Class of 2024 student reciting their oath. Source: University of Houston

In medical schools across the country, students in medical, nursing, and physician assistant programs participate in a ritual known as the white coat ceremony. This signifies the beginning of their journeys to achieve the long white lab coat, a well-recognized symbol of respect and professionalism. During the ceremony, students receive a short white lab coat and recite a class oath or pledge, acknowledging their obligation to compassion and scientific excellence as health care providers. Incoming students often write their own class oaths. This year, amid a civil rights movement protesting police brutality and global health pandemic, students at two medical schools stand out for writing class oaths that acknowledge racism’s impact on public health. These new oaths call for ...

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System Justification Leads to Ignoring COVID-19 Safety Precautions


latina looking at face mask with system justification in covid-19 pandemic

COVID-19 has been a force in our lives for the last 10 months. At this point, we know the standard procedures for safety precautions, like wearing a mask, keeping physical distance, and avoiding crowded public spaces. We’ve even started administering a vaccine to healthcare workers and the elderly, with the FDA emergency-use authorization of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine this past weekend. But despite all this, the pandemic still isn’t over. COVID-19 cases are spiking in many areas across the country as people move events indoors due to colder weather and are travelling more for the holidays. Not to mention pandemic fatigue. Another big safety concern is using “system justification” to ignore safety precautions. This happens when people rationalize unsafe behaviors ...

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