The Number of Uninsured Latinos Decreases to 18%



US Latinos and other racial/ethnic minority populations made historic gains in healthcare coverage in the years after the Affordable Care Act (ACA), according to five recent research briefs from the US Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE). In the research brief focused on Latinos, research showed that the uninsured rate for nonelderly Latinos decreased from 32.7% to 18% from 2010 to 2022. However, the brief also found that Latinos are more than twice as likely as non-Latino Whites to be uninsured. Let’s further explore health insurance coverage among Latinos. Latinos Facing Health Barriers For Latinos, health outcomes are affected by factors like lack of health insurance, language and cultural barriers, and lack of access to care. “Studies ...

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Tell HHS: Promotoras Are Essential for Public Health and Vaccine Education!



As COVID-19 exposed cracks in our healthcare system and racial/ethnic health inequities, community health workers rose to the challenge to educate communities on virus prevention, dispel misinformation, and advocate for the vaccine.  Community health workers – called promotoras in Latino communities – are non-medical public health workers who connect people to healthcare and social services.  The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Minority Health (OMH) is seeking public comments on the use of community health workers to increase “cultural competency in educational campaigns on public health vaccines and prevention, including but not limited to influenza and COVID-19.”  Submit this Salud America! model comment to tell HHS about the importance ...

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Addressing Heart Failure in Latinos with Close the Gap Resources



Heart disease risk is high for U.S. Latinos, data shows. While most Latinos were aware of their cardiovascular risk factors, less than half of the adults in a study of stroke survivors had healthy blood pressure and cholesterol, and only half had healthy blood sugar levels, according to the American Heart Association. “Hispanic adults are more likely than white adults to develop heart failure. But Hispanic adults living with heart failure are less likely to get appropriate care and treatment than white adults living with heart failure,” according to a Close the Gap resource. This emphasizes the importance of targeted prevention programs and culturally relevant resources for Latinos to avoid stroke, heart attack, and other cardiovascular diseases. That’s where Close the ...

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The Surprising Level of Material Hardship for Latinos in the ‘COVID Year’



In 2020, COVID-19 shut down the world. People were forced to navigate social isolation, food shortages, business closures, virtual schooling, reduced work hours, and job loss amid the pandemic. Latino families suffered from some of the highest rates of COVID-related mortality and socioeconomic impacts, worsening Latino health inequities. With 2020 now several years past, how bad was the pandemic for Latinos? 6 in 10 (62%) Latino households with children experienced at least one material hardship in the form of housing quality, bill-paying, food insecurity, and/or medical hardship in 2020, according to a new report from the National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families that looks back at the impact of COVID-19 on Latinos. Material Hardship in 2020 amid COVID-19 ...

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Grace After Fire: Veterans Group Helps Women Vets Help Themselves



Facing homelessness and battling PTSD, trauma, and disability, US Navy veteran Olivia Zavala Carridine was struggling.  She found a lifeline in Grace After Fire.  Olivia, a mother of four in San Antonio, got pivotal support from the women veteran’s organization – which aims to provide women the resources and tools to succeed in her community, work, and home after leaving the military.  “[Grace After Fire] has empowered me to believe that I shouldn't be ashamed of my story,” she said. “I have a sisterhood with women that I didn't have many times with my sisters serving alongside me.”  Olivia got back on her feet with the help of Grace After Fire – and she’s not the only one.  Grace After Fire Origins  Some wars take place on a battlefield, standing toe ...

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Ruling Expands Health Care Coverage to DACA Recipients



Federal regulators recently published a final rule to expand healthcare for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients and certain other noncitizens. The rule – which modifies the definition of “lawfully present” – essentially opens enrollment in the healthcare marketplace to those in the DACA program, many of whom are Latinos. The ruling will take effect on Nov. 1, 2024. Salud America! members were among 530 people who submitted a public comment last year to support this expansion of healthcare access to DACA recipients. “This overdue step is a critical victory for equitable access to health care,” according to the National Immigration Law Center. Let’s dive further into what this ruling means and how it will impact Latinos. What is DACA? ...

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Explore Your Mental Health with the All of Us Research Program



One in four U.S. adults were living with a mental health condition as of last year — that’s nearly 60 million people, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.  Many questions remain about the rise of mental health issues.   That's why the National Institutes of Health’s All of Us Research Program has taken a special interest in mental health.  As part of the program’s mission to collect the health data of over 1 million Americans, the All of Us Research Program is learning more about the mental health backgrounds of participants, which could advance mental health research.   When signing up for the program, participants fill out mental health surveys.   Through these surveys researchers can study early mental illness risk ...

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Webinar: What Does Your Health Story Say About You?



In March 2024, we invited organizations, leaders, and clinicians in The Alamo City to learn about the social determinants of health (SDOH) in San Antonio and how they could leverage the All of Us Research Program to promote health equity in research. This time, we are getting personal about your health by exploring the benefits of All of Us, including how you can get a free report about your genetic ancestry, your genetic traits (why you might love or hate cilantro), and risk for diseases. To learn more about your health story, watch our webinar, “What Does Your Health Story Say About You? Investing in Personal Health Through All of Us." Join us as we take a tour of the interactive All of Us Research Program portal and answer some of your burning questions about how the program can ...

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11 Amazing Resources for Caregivers of a Loved One with a Brain Tumor



A brain tumor is a life-changing diagnosis. But not all brain tumors are the same. They are unique, as is their impact on a person’s body, emotions, and quality of life. That is why we need care partners. People navigating a brain tumor diagnosis often rely on a care partner or caregiver – a friend, familia member, or someone else helping with their everyday activities. In fact, a quarter of Americans serve as caregivers to a beloved family member or friend. Let’s dive into how a caregiver for someone with a brain tumor can balance care with their personal and professional obligations, and where to get support and resources. 1. Learn More about Brain Tumors Like the patient, caregivers and care partners need to learn more about brain tumors and how it will affect ...

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