Debunking the Myths and Misinformation on COVID-19


Woman with face mask getting vaccinated, coronavirus, covid-19 and vaccination concept.

As we fight the COVID-19 pandemic, we have to make sure we’ve got all the right facts. Public health experts are seeing a lot of misinformation about COVID-19 spread on social media. Whether conspiracy theories or jokes about side effects, experts are concerned about the implications it could have. Misinformation could especially hurt Latinos, who are being disproportionately hurt by the COVID-19 pandemic and have shown hesitancy about receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. “It’s the repetition [of misinformation] that worries me,” said Eveyln Pérez-Verdía, a strategist who tracks Spanish disinformation, according to NBC News. "People are seeing this constantly.” What is some of the misinformation being spread about COVID-19? Let’s check the myths and facts. What are ...

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Cheryl Aguilar: Providing Mental Health Support to Families with Immigration Trauma



Immigration is difficult and often traumatic. People who immigrate to the U.S. often face a dangerous journey only to be met with aggression and xenophobia at the border. It can lead to loss of hope, anxiety, depression, and even suicide. Cheryl Aguilar wants to help families experiencing the trauma of immigration and adjusting to new life in the U.S. Aguilar immigrated from Honduras as a teenager, an experience that helped guide her to give back to immigrant communities. Aguilar is a clinical social worker and founding director and therapist at the Hope Center for Wellness. “As a therapist, one of the things that I do is help individuals, families, and communities heal from whatever distress, trauma, or experiences they might have encountered. I believe in holistic healing, ...

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How Texas is Tackling Alzheimer’s Disease Care


Texas State Health Tackles Alzheimer Disease Care

Alzheimer’s disease is an illness that affects the lives of many, and it impacts some Americans more than others.  In fact, studies show that U.S. Latinos are 1.5 times more likely to develop Alzheimer's than their White peers. That number is only going to get worse over time if dedicated action isn't taken.  The number of Latinos living with Alzheimer’s is projected to grow from 430,000 in 2014 to 3.2 million in 2060. That is more than an alarming seven-fold increase. Yet Latinos are underrepresented in clinical research across the board. Fortunately, Texas officials and researchers are working on this issue. How Big a Problem is Alzheimer's Disease in Texas and Among Latinos? The problem is huge in Texas, according to the experts. "In Texas in 2019 alone, 1650 ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 1/19: What Can We Do to Stop Cervical Cancer?



January is Cervical Health Awareness Month. Each year, more than 13,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in the United States. This cancer is hurting communities of color, with Latinas being at a high risk of being diagnosed. But cervical cancer is preventable. Stopping cervical cancer for all communities means education about the causes, prevention, and treatment of HPV and cervical cancer. Join #SaludTues on Jan. 19, 2021, at 1:00 PM EST to tweet about what we can do to stop cervical cancer. WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “What Can We Do to Stop Cervical Cancer?” DATE: Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2020 TIME: 1:00-2:00 p.m. EST (10:00-11:00 p.m. PST) WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: Cervivor (@IamCervivor), ...

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Texas Latinos Urge for Equity in COVID-19 Vaccinations


Texas Latinos Equity COVID-19 Vaccinations

Despite experiencing some of COVID-19’s worst impacts, Latinos struggle to get a vaccination — especially in Austin. This comes at a time when many from communities of color are already uncertain in the first place. There are higher rates of Blacks and Latinos who report hesitancy about obtaining a COVID-19 vaccination, according to the COVID Collaborative. This kind of information is exactly why those ethnic groups need to be prioritized in the vaccine rollout, according to the Austin Latino Coalition. "Due to the historical discrimination that has often posed barriers to economic advancement, lack of access to health care, food and other systemic inequities that still exist today, Latinos, African-Americans, and low-income communities have borne the brunt of the COVID-19 ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 1/12: Improving Oral Health across the Latino Lifespan


oral health latino lifespan old man with child playing basketball gym

Even in a pandemic, we still have a lot to smile about. We all care about our parents, sisters, brothers, niños, and our abuelos. We want to make sure they are the healthiest they can be, and that includes their oral health. So let’s use #SaludTues on Jan. 12, 2021, to tweet about how we can help people of all ages improve their oral health and be able to flash those healthy smiles for a lifetime! WHERE: Twitter WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat “Improving Oral Health across the Latino Lifespan” WHEN: 1-2 p.m. ET (12-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021 HOST: Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio (@SaludAmerica) CO-HOST: Campaign for Dental Health from the American Academy of Pediatrics (@ILikeMyTeeth), Hispanic Dental Association (@HDAssoc), Oral Health Forum ...

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In New Class Oaths, Medical Students Commit to Fight Racial Injustices


University of Houston College of Medicine Class of 2024 student reciting their oath. Source: University of Houston

In medical schools across the country, students in medical, nursing, and physician assistant programs participate in a ritual known as the white coat ceremony. This signifies the beginning of their journeys to achieve the long white lab coat, a well-recognized symbol of respect and professionalism. During the ceremony, students receive a short white lab coat and recite a class oath or pledge, acknowledging their obligation to compassion and scientific excellence as health care providers. Incoming students often write their own class oaths. This year, amid a civil rights movement protesting police brutality and global health pandemic, students at two medical schools stand out for writing class oaths that acknowledge racism’s impact on public health. These new oaths call for ...

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Update: Coronavirus Case Rates and Death Rates for Latinos in the United States


Latina hispanic sitting on park bench with face mask to prevent covid-19 coroanvirus

The coronavirus COVID-19 can affect anyone. But reports show Latinos and other people of color are disproportionately affected, amid worsening historical inequities. What are the data really showing? UPDATE 1/13/21: Various new state and U.S. data! COVID-19 Case Rates for Latinos Coronavirus is disproportionately sickening U.S. Latinos. The U.S. COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate is 343.4 per 100,000, reaching the highest point since the beginning of the pandemic, according to CDC data updated on Jan. 8, 2021. Hospitalization rates were highest among Latinos, at 3.4 times the rate among Whites. The United States is experiencing record-highs for single-day new coronavirus cases. Latinos face a heavier burden of cases. Here are some state examples of Latino ...

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Comment Now: USDA Wants to Weaken School Food Nutrition Standards Again



Once again, the Trump administration is going after school nutrition guidelines. A USDA proposal brought forth on Nov. 25, 2020, would allow flavored, low-fat milk, cut whole grain-rich servings in half, and ease restrictions on sodium to enable nutrition directors more time to meet sodium reduction targets. This isn’t the first time the administration has tried to weaken school food nutrition. Just a few months ago, the U.S. Agriculture Department sought to ease restrictions on sodium and whole-grain requirements in school meals, but a federal district judge struck it down due to violations of regulatory law, according to The New York Times. The proposed rule is open for public comment until Dec. 28, 2020. Leave a comment to speak up for school food nutrition! Comment ...

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