New Study Confirms Alarming Breast Cancer Disparities


latina breast cancer pink

Latinas and black women may face increased risks of developing triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC), according to a study published in Cancer. These forms are often aggressive and do not respond to hormone therapy or targeted therapy. These latest findings solidify known cancer development disparities, which continue to grow amongst Latinos, other racial/ethnic minority groups, and young women. Breast Cancer Inequities Dr. Lia Scott, of the Georgia State University School of Public Health, and her team studied all available diagnosed breast cancer cases from 2010 to 2014 using the U.S. Cancer Statistics database. It consists of a population-based surveillance system of cancer registries with numbers representing 99% of the U.S. population. "With the advent and ...

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How California’s Tobacco Laws Are Actually Reducing Lung Cancer Deaths


quit smoking cigarette california law lung cancer

Lung cancer deaths are a whopping 28% lower in California than the rest of the nation. This is likely due to the state's early adoption of tobacco control programs, which are associated with a "major reduction in cigarette smoking" among people younger than 35, according to a recent study by UC San Diego. What California laws are working and why? How can you mimic them in your area? Find out in ChangeLab Solutions's new guide book, "Tobacco Laws Affecting California." The book explains existing California laws related to tobacco use, sales, and marketing, and new efforts like San Francisco's ban on e-cigs. "(The decline in smoking in California) can only be attributed to the success of tobacco control in this state which has been so effective in convincing young people not to ...

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New Law in Nevada Requires Police Send Notice to Schools if Student Exposed to Trauma



Children exposed to traumatic events can struggle to focus, learn, and thrive in school. In the aftermath of a traumatic event, the school setting might potentially buffer or aggravate the negative effects of toxic stress. Worse, school personnel often have no idea what kind of internal wounds their students bring to class, thus are not prepared to act as buffers. That’s why Nevada’s (29% Latino) state government recently passed Senate Bill 80, a state law requiring the establishment of the Handle with Care. What is Handle With Care? Handle With Care is a West Virginia Center for Children’s Justice’s program promotes communication and collaboration with police, schools, and mental health leaders to help children who’ve experienced trauma. It enables local police to ...

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Building for Holistic Health: Natural and Artificial Lighting


Natural light health

Many people spend up to 90% of their time indoors, whether at the office, in a restaurant, or at home. The way architects, designers, and construction workers erect these buildings can impact human health — including the way light is disbursed. Medical professionals and those in charge of building these structures need to collaborate to create a culture of holistic health. Natural and artificial lighting make significant impacts on people’s sleep cycle, skin, and eyes, according to the European Union’s Scientific Committee. “There is a concern that the emission levels of some lamps could be harmful for the skin and the eyes,” the group states. “Both natural and artificial light can also disrupt the human body clock and the hormonal system, and this can cause health ...

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What are the 100 Most Dangerous Congressional Districts for People Walking?



People in lower-income neighborhoods die while walking at much higher rates than those in better socio-economic areas. Why? Impoverished communities are significantly less likely to have sidewalks, marked crosswalks, and street design to support safer, slower speeds, according to Smart Growth America. Dangerous Congressional Districts Moreover, many communities have spent decades designing streets for speeding cars rather than prioritizing safety for walkers, bikers, and those taking transit. Since federal dollars and policies helped create these unsafe streets, Smart Growth America thinks that federal funds, policies, and guidance have a significant role in fixing existing and designing future streets. To urge guidance from elected representatives, Smart Growth America and ...

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5 Reasons to Attend ‘Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos’ Conference


Latino Cancer Conference 2020 in San Antonio UT Health

In the next 20 years, Latinos are expected to face a 142% rise in cancer rates. Cancer is the top cause of premature death among Latinos. Latinos have higher rates than their peers for many cancers. Latinos also experience cancer differently—from genetics to the environment to healthcare access. This Latino cancer crisis is especially alarming given the growing Latino population. That's why, in 2018, Dr. Amelie Ramirez of Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio hosted the 1st-ever “Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos” conference. Now Ramirez is bringing back the conference on Feb. 26-28, 2020 in San Antonio! “We are excited to again bring together the brightest scientists, clinicians, advocates, policy leaders, and students to share what they're learned ...

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Tell Healthy People 2030: Address Social Determinants in New Definition of Health Literacy



What exactly is “health literacy”? Governmental health leaders want to provide a good definition. Healthy People 2030, a 10-year outline of health improvement goals from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, wants your input on their working definition: “Health literacy occurs when a society provides accurate health information and services that people can easily find, understand, and use to inform their decisions and actions.” This definition, while an improvement over Healthy People 2020’s, focuses too much on healthcare-related information and services and too little on the social determinants of health. So, we drafted a model comment and a revised definition to submit by Aug. 5, 2019! Send an Email: Address Social Determinants in the Definition of ...

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Brenda Garza on Breast Cancer: ‘Nothing Lasts Forever’


Brenda Garza Breast Cancer Survivor 1

By Brenda Garza Austin, Texas, Cancer Survivor I moved to Detroit, Michigan, newlywed to an engineer, in 2003. Because we moved during December we didn’t do many outdoor activities or exercise something that we used to do in Mexico all the time. Gabe and I met at a spinning class and we became boyfriend and girlfriend after few dates. We both loved the outdoors. We were very excited about new opportunity and challenge to live in a new country but we definitely weren’t ready for such long, harsh winters in North America. But once spring and summer began, we were happy doing outdoor activities like cycling. Michigan has beautiful state parks, with water, hills, hiking trails, biking trails and green vegetation, something we didn’t have in Mexico. We soon learned to ...

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Salud America! Network Speaks Up for Safe Sunscreen!


Sunscreen FDA Rule

In February, the FDA announced its plan to review sunscreen product chemicals, many of which can harm people and the environment. The agency spent the past five months seeking public opinion on its plans, and 19,256 people and groups─including members of Salud America!’s network─submitted comments with a clear message: Ensure our sunscreen is safe! Still, the FDA has made only 1,577 comments available to the public. Of the listed messages, 345 came from Salud America! advocates, for 21.8% of all comments! Are There Serious Risks? Research on sunscreen has shown that certain chemicals, such as avobenzone, oxybenzone, and octocrylene, can enter a user’s bloodstream and cause potential harm. These substances have also caused environmental damage to coral reefs. Still, ...

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