San Antonio Researcher to Study Why Gastric Cancer Is Rising in Latinos


young man having a stomachache gastric cancer

Gastric cancer, which forms in the lining of the stomach, is more likely to afflict Latinos than whites, and in Texas is diagnosed at younger ages and less curable stages. Dorothy Long Parma wants to find out why. Long Parma, a researcher at the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health San Antonio, the team behind Salud America!, recently received a three-year, $360,000 "Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program Career Development Award" from the U.S. Department of Defense to study the risk factors for gastric cancer in Latinos. The study will look closely at H. pylori bacterial infection, which increases risk of gastric cancer, and is common among Latinos, according to a prior study led by Long Parma. Long Parma also will examine other factors like behaviors, ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 5/28: How to Prevent Skin Cancer in Communities of Color


sunscreen apply to prevent skin cancer latino hispanic girl

Summer is here. Unfortunately, so is skin cancer risk. Too much unprotected exposure to the sun can give you more than a sun burn. Rates of melanoma—the most dangerous form of skin cancer—have skyrocketed in recent years. This rise is happening even among Latinos and other dark-skinned populations. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, May 28, 2019, to share strategies to improve the prevention of skin cancer among Latinos and all people: WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “How to Prevent Skin Cancer in Communities of Color” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, May 28, 2019 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (@CDC_Cancer); the American Academy of Dermatology ...

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Top Agriculture State to Prohibit Use of Controversial Pesticide



In California (39.1% Latino) there will soon be a ban on the widely utilized pesticide, chlorpyrifos. The state, which is one of the most prolific agricultural producers in America, is reportedly the most significant users of the chemical. "This pesticide is a neurotoxin, and it was first put on the market in 1965," State Environmental Secretary Jared Blumenfeld told The Californian. "So it's been on the shelf a long time, and it's past its sell-by date. What is Chlorpyrifos & Where Is It Found? Chlorpyrifos controls foliage and soil-borne insects on a variety of food and feed crops, according to the EPA. The chemical can be found in both agricultural and non-agriculture operations and is used: Mainly as a treatment, in terms of total pounds, in corn On soybeans, ...

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Dr. Amelie Ramirez to Chair New Department of Population Health Sciences at UT Health San Antonio


Amelie Ramirez Latino Health Champion 2018

Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, director of Salud America! at the the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health San Antonio and a leading health disparities researcher, has been named chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, announced Dr. Robert Hromas, dean of the Long School of Medicine. The appointment is effective June 1. Dr. Hromas also announced that the department will be renamed the Department of Population Health Sciences. The new department will continue to provide services in all biological and medical analytical areas. It will also focus on efforts to use analytical tools to enhance the health of the unique populations in San Antonio and South Texas. Dr. Ramirez will continue to serve as director of the Institute for Health Promotion Research, ...

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Rates of Fatty Liver Disease Rising in Latino Kids



A lack of access to healthy, sustainable food is causing Latino kids to develop severe health conditions including issues with their internal organs. One significant issue of concern is pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The rate of diagnoses is increasing among Latino kids, Kaiser Health News reports. “Fatty liver disease is ripping through the Latino community like a silent tsunami and especially affecting children,” said Dr. Rohit Kohli, chief of gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition at the University of Southern California and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. The ailment is also linked to genetics as well as high levels of sugar and fat in diets. Fatty Liver Disease & Latino Kids Before 2006, many doctors did not know that children could develop ...

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Erika Zamarripa: Learning to Live After Breast Cancer


Erika Zamarripa breast cancer survivor San Antonio

By Erika Zamarripa San Antonio Cancer Survivor There is that "C" word again. Cancer can be defined as a "disease caused by an uncontrolled division of abnormal cells in a part of the body." Or it also can be defined as a "practice or phenomenon perceived to be evil or destructive and hard to contain or eradicate." Whatever you want to call it, it sucks. I was diagnosed with Stage 2 ER positive breast cancer at the age of 32 on Dec. 18, 2013. My twin boys were only 9 years old at the time and I was working at H-E-B Pharmacy. I remember one day taking a shower and I felt a lump on my breast. This lump hurt when I touched it and the longer, I felt it, the more I started to worry. I called my gynecologist and made an appointment. He felt it and sent me for a mammogram and an ...

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Latinos Diabetes Patients Much More Likely to Undergo Amputations


Latinos Daibetes Patients Much More Likely to Undergo Amputations Than Whites

Diabetes development can lead to numerous life-changing complications when the disease spirals out of control, including the amputation of limbs. As the prevalence of the illness continues to rise––30 million Americans are estimated to have diabetes––black and Latino patients are more likely to have an amputation compared to non-Hispanic whites, CNN reports. Diabetic foot complications exact a substantial clinical and economic toll in acute care settings, particularly among the rural and working poor. The Centers for Disease Control reports that in 2014, an estimated 29.1 million adults in the United States, or 9.3% of the adult population, had diabetes. In California (39.1% Latino), minority groups were more than twice as likely as whites to undergo amputations, ...

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Medicare’s ‘What’s Covered’ Mobile App Now in Spanish


Medicare what's covered app

U.S. Latinos are at higher risk for diabetes, obesity, and other health conditions than their White peers. Yet they face many barriers in accessing Medicare and other healthcare coverage. A new app can help these Latinos. Medicare's first and only app, “What’s covered,” is now available in English or Spanish. The app delivers accurate cost, coverage, and eligibility details for Original Medicare Part A and Part B items and services. The app is free on both the App Store and Google Play. To download the app in Spanish, just search for “Qué está cubierto.” What Can the App Do? Medicare's new app takes some of the most popular information from the Medicare website. It ensures beneficiaries have personalized, accessible guidance to make informed decisions about their ...

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Phoenix Children’s Hospital: Creating a Culture of Bike Safety for Latino and All Kids


Injury prevention specialist, Juan Tarango created a six-week, hands-on bike safety course for fourth grade students in Phoenix, AZ.

Juan Tarango of Tempe, Arizona, has been an avid cyclist for over 30 years. For him, it’s about exploring, exploring his city, state, country and even other countries. He loves to see kids ride bicycles, having fun and getting physical activity. But he hated seeing how many kids show up with bike-related injuries at the Phoenix Children’s Hospital ER where he worked. “One kid─wasn’t going fast, wasn’t doing tricks─falls, hits his head, and ends up with life-changing brain injury,” Tarango said. Tarango wanted to help. He wondered: What could he do to teach Latino and all kids bicycle safety behaviors, and thus reduce  bike-related injuries? Children, Bicycling, and Injuries Bicycling is good for your health. For kids, it can help develop muscle ...

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