#SaludTues Tweetchat 8/11: Why Data Matter? The Role of Data for an Equitable COVID-19 Response


latina woman with face mask to prevent coronavirus covid-19

Coronavirus can affect anyone. But reports continue to show the COVID-19 pandemic is disproportionately impacting Latinos and other people of color, and worsening historical inequities. What are the data really showing? Do we have the right data? How can we use that data to improve health amid the pandemic? Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020, to tweet about why data matter and the important role of data in ensuring an equitable response to COVID-19! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat “Why Data Matter? The Role of Data for an Equitable COVID-19 Response” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (12-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020 WHERE: Twitter HOST: Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio (@SaludAmerica) CO-HOSTS: County Health Rankings & Roadmaps (@CHRankings), ...

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Access to Care is Vital for Healthy Outcomes in Latino Children


Access to Care is Vital for Healthy Outcomes in Latino Children doctor child patient office

Where you live matters for your health. The health of any population is determined by several factors including the physical, emotional, socioeconomic, and environmental circumstances in which they live. For U.S. Latinos, these factors can be daily challenges and cause poor health outcomes, especially for their children. As a result, Latino children have higher rates of obesity and diabetes and lower levels of physical activity than their non-Latino peers. These inequities are worsening amid the COVID-19 pandemic. These children also are at least twice as likely to be uninsured. "To help reverse these outcomes, it is important for Latino children and youth to enroll in health coverage and have access to preventive care. Children who have health coverage are shown to have ...

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Health Experts: Spanish Speakers at Elevated Risk for COVID-19


coronavirus job loss stress latino families surveys

U.S. Latinos are bearing an extraordinary burden of COVID-19 cases and deaths. Why is this? Health experts are trying to find an answer. They say the pandemic is worsening historical health and social inequities among Latinos and other people of color, affecting people of a certain age, and those who have diabetes, obesity, and cancer, as well as those who smoke. Now a study points to a new, but common, culprit: language barriers (and the healthcare system's failure to accommodate people who don't speak English). Latinos Face Language Barriers During COVID-19 Pandemic Language is a common barrier to health care. That's why Spanish translation is important in education, providing medical care, bullying prevention, healthcare access, and even podcasting. When it comes to ...

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Study: Chest X-rays Show Severe COVID-19 Cases in Latino Patients


Chest X-rays Severe COVID-19 Latino Patients

The coronavirus pandemic has had a devastating impact on people of color. Since the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, one fact has been proven correct time and again: Minority groups face a higher risk of infection and the many burdens associated. This fact has been proven in a recent study from Massachusetts General Hospital. "Radiologists from saw these disparities firsthand in April among patients admitted to the hospital with confirmed COVID-19 infection, and at one of the hospital's respiratory infection clinics in Chelsea, a city just north of Boston that is home to a predominantly Spanish-speaking Hispanic community," the researchers write. "A significant proportion of the patients who visited the Chelsea clinic had COVID-19, and the level of disease the ...

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The Fight for a Clean Environment Continues Amid Coronavirus Pandemic


Fight Clean Environment Coronavirus Pandemic

For years, one disadvantaged community of color, the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, have been fighting a battle for their land against big oil. The Dakota Access Pipeline is the center of that battle. The tribe urges—along with numerous environmental activists—for courts to halt its use. More than just an infringement on that territory, this issue raises numerous environmental concerns. Despite some wins against Energy Transfer LP, the pipeline’s operators, courts are still allowing for the pipeline to remain operational during the suit’s proceedings. Worse, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread throughout the country, scientists and researchers are discovering more about how harmful environmental exposures, such as noxious fumes from oil, can impact those infected by ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 7/28─Healthy Vision Month: Eye Health Is My Health


Healthy Vision Month eye health tweetchat july 2020

Good vision and eye health are vital to many aspects of health. Yet Latinos and other people of color have higher rates of vision loss, diabetic eye disease, and cataracts than their white peers, according to recent eye research. To celebrate Healthy Vision Month in July, let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, July 28, 2020, to tweet about the latest on eye health disparities. We also will tweet about how to prevent vision loss and chronic diseases like diabetes, and how taking care of your health can also help create better vision! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat, “Healthy Vision Month: Eye Health Is My Health” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, July 28, 2020 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: National Eye Institute ...

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Mimi Frazier White: If We Fight Together, We Will Win Against Breast Cancer


Mimi Frazier White collage

By Harmenia "Mimi" Frazier White Breast Cancer Survivor My journey began in 2015 when I was diagnosed with stage 3b invasive breast cancer. For years prior to the diagnosis, I was misdiagnosed and told that I had fibrocystic breast disease. If I didn't finally want to know what was going on with my body, I wouldn't be here today. Once I was diagnosed, I went into chemotherapy for 5 months and got married right after I finished. In July 2016 I got a double mastectomy and lymph node removal next, followed by 3 months of radiation. The next year, I had to get a salpingo oophorectomy (removal of the ovaries and fallopian tubes). At this point, cancer had taken nearly everything from me. Luckily, it didn't take my spirit or my strong will to live. I fought hard to maintain this ...

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Cities Need to Drastically Scale Up Contact Tracing to Slow Coronavirus Spread


Cities Need to Drastically Scale Up Contact Tracing to Slow Coronavirus Spread

For months now, health leaders have asked Americans to flatten the COVID-19 curve by behaving as if they have been exposed─stay home, stop hanging out with friends and family, avoid public places like gyms and bars, and wear a mask when around others. This individual behavior is needed to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus. But, at the same time, public health departments must do their part, too. They are responsible for “contact tracing”─contacting people who have tested positive for COVID-19 and those in close contact with them to give them critical information to slow disease spread: understand the possibility that they could spread the infection to others even if they themselves do not feel ill; understand what they should do to monitor themselves for ...

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