Jacquelin Cordero: Health is a Social Justice Issue


CorderoJacquelin exito participant 2018

Jacquelin Cordero grew up on the borderplex (Cd. Juárez, Chih., MX – El Paso, Texas, US). As such, she’s very conscious of the impact of economic and societal differences and how it increases the disparities in her community. Cordero views adequate, accessible, and available health services as a human right and social justice issue. With the support of her parents, encouragement from her sisters, and a little pinole to energize her, she wants to use public health to address important mental health issues such as suicide prevention and substance abuse. Even after dropping out of high school, she has always found a way to keep going, and that includes currently working on her graduate certificate of public health and master’s degree in social work at the University of Texas ...

Read More

Rural Pharmacy Deserts Emerge Across the U.S.


closing of a walgreen's pharmacy from the Anniston Star

Hospital closures have become the norm in many rural areas. Now, rural pharmacies are headed on the same path, according to a U.S. News Report. Over the past 16 years, 1,231 rural, independently-owned pharmacies have closed. That's 16% of all rural pharmacies. Fewer than 6,400 pharmacies are left in rural communities. Rural communities that had at least one retail (independent, chain, or franchise) pharmacy in March 2003 had no retail pharmacy in March 2018, according to RUPRI Center for Rural Health Policy Analysis Rural Policy Brief. Residents of rural communities now have to travel great distances for medications and/or turn to mail-order prescriptions that make it impossible for in-person consultation concerning questions about the medication. “Closure of ...

Read More

#SaludTues Tweetchat 11/27: The Impact of Public Charge on Immigrant Families


Keep Families Together

All families, including immigrant families, deserve the right to have the healthiest and best quality of life that they can. Despite the fact that immigrants generally benefit the economy, contributing $743 billion to the U.S. economy (2009-2011), the Trump administration is proposing changes to the Public Charge rule which could penalize immigrants (both legal and undocumented) for using public benefits. What does this mean for immigrant children and their families? For many, this may mean the difference between obtaining lawful permanent residence or a green card and having access to nutritious foods, medical care, and housing. Not having access to such public benefits only makes it more difficult for families to break the cycle of poverty. Join us this #SaludTues on ...

Read More

San Antonio Health Department Budgets for City’s First Trauma-Informed Position



San Antonio approved funding for the city’s first ever position dedicated to addressing and preventing childhood trauma and toxic stress. Nationwide, schools, communities, organizations and municipal agencies are working to better help the 46% of youth who have suffered an adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). For example, in Newark, New Jersey, Equal Justice USA is working with the Newark Police to teach policy and civilians how trauma impacts their daily lives, and in San Francisco, California, pediatricians are working community mental health providers in schools to address childhood trauma and reunification stress among unaccompanied immigrant children. Unfortunately, efforts like these often lack the coordinated, community-wide network needed to reach children and families ...

Read More

Rossmary Marquez: From Political Turmoil to Public Health Promotion


MarquezRossmary Exito 2018 participant

With a strong support network and a tenacious spirit built from escaping political turmoil in her native Venezuela and moving to the United States a decade ago, Rossmary Marquez is persistent in her efforts to improve people’s health. Marquez completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Oregon and graduated from Texas A&M with a master’s degree in public health. Her research interests include immigration, health disparities, and minority health. Before starting her master’s degree studies, Marquez worked for the CDC as an emergency risk communicator and was involved in the Ebola and Zika response. With the Venezuelan charm as a continual reminder of her roots and her path, Marquez goes the extra mile to talk with people about their experiences and how that ...

Read More

New Texas Institute Aims to Improve Rural Health



It is a well known fact that where we live plays a vital role in our health, and those who live in rural areas struggle to access quality healthcare. Rural residents are more likely to die from heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, and unintentional injuries than their urban counterparts. In Texas, more than 3 million people live in rural areas, and are more likely to be uninsured, have lower incomes, and higher rates of death from preventive chronic diseases. The Center for Optimizing Rural Health, part of the Texas A&M Rural and Community Health Institute, aims to change all that. Center for Optimizing Rural Health Texas A&M University has been chosen as the sole recipient of a five-year grant, which will fund the Center for Optimizing Rural Health, ...

Read More

Natalie Alfaro-Perez: Hard-working Advocate for Latino Health


PerezANatalia exito participant 2018

Natalie Alfaro-Perez wasn’t spoiled growing up. In fact, her parents already had her mowing the lawn at age 8, among other chores. This instilled in her a hard-working attitude and created in her a determination to achieve success. She has put those values to work as a public health student and health educator in a federally qualified health center, and she’s pushing for more progress as a health equity advocate. Alfaro-Perez received her bachelor’s degree in health science from California State University Sacramento, and is currently working on her master’s degree in public health from California State University, Northridge. In her work as a health educator, she is able to provide education to patients regarding chronic illnesses, and weight management. To further ...

Read More

Ramirez Named to National Committee on Science Communication


amelie ramirez in 2014

Congratulations to Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, director of Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio! Ramirez was named to the National Academies of Medicine's Standing Committee on Advancing Science Communication Research and Practice on Nov. 7, 2018. The committee's mission is to engage partners to advance the field of science communication. That means building a more coherent knowledge base about approaches to communicating science, making it easier for science communication practitioners to access and use research to inform their practice, and supporting individuals and groups in communicating science outside the scientific enterprise. On the committee, Ramirez joins other practitioners and researchers from groups like Pew Charitable Trusts, America Public Health Association, and ...

Read More

#SaludTues Tweetchat 11/20: Enrolling Latino Families in Healthcare Coverage


Health Overhaul Texas

Only 1 in 10 who enrolled for healthcare coverage via HealthCare.gov were Latino, a lower rate than their black and white peers, according to the federal data. Many Latinos thus miss out on better healthcare access. How can we help? Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2018, to tweet how to help Latino parents and kids get the healthcare coverage they need before the end of Open Enrollment on Dec. 15! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: How to Encourage Latino families to Enroll in Healthcare Coverage TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, November 20th, 2018 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: The National Hispanic Medical Association (@NHMA) OPTIONAL HASHTAGS: #GetCovered #OpenEnrollment ...

Read More