Salud Talks Podcast Episode Two: “Breaking Tradition”


Salud Talks individualized medicine

Has your doctor ever asked about faith or family? Dr. Daniel Carlos Hughes and his colleagues are doing just that in a case study revolved around how medical professionals heal their patients. Their end goal? Treating people, especially those with chronic conditions, holistically. Check out Dr. Hughes and his team on the #SaludTalks Podcast, Episode Two, "Breaking Tradition"! WHAT: A #SaludTalks discussion on holistic health among Latino and all patients and providers GUESTS: Dr. Daniel Carlos Hughes, Assistant Professor at the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at UT Health San Antonio; Dr. Alexis Ortiz, Chair of the Department of Physical Therapy UT Health San Antonio; Corina Zamora, Project Coordinator at IHPR at UT Health San Antonio; and Angelika Aguilar, ...

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Your Skin Color May Decide Where Your Ambulance Ride Ends Up


ambulance color latino emergency room visit

Latinos and blacks are more likely to be taken by ambulance to safety-net hospital emergency rooms, and not always the closest hospital, according to a new study. National guidelines require EMS transportation to the nearest suitable hospital. However, the study, led by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine, found large racial/ethnic differences for where emergency patients are taken. Latinos and blacks were more likely than whites to be taken to a safety-net hospital—one with a legal obligation or mission to give health care regardless of insurance status. This suggests "ambulance diversion" bias, where ambulances don't take certain patients to the nearest suitable hospital.  "The cause for this observed pattern is unknown and needs to be further studied to ...

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Advocates: ‘Tragic’ New Rule Will Hurt Latina Reproductive Health


Latina reproductive health title X

Organizations who offer reproductive services in areas with limited options for low-income Latinas and other women of color are dealing with a new Trump administration rule that can limit clinics' access to federal funding, making it harder to offer affordable care to women, NBC News reports. The "gag rule," named because advocates say it hinders a doctor's ability to provide the care they think is best, went into effect August 2019. The rule states that family planning services that get Title X federal funding must also be financially detached from any abortion services. Abortion and Title X services also must take place in separate facilities. However, federal law already forbids taxpayer funds to be used for abortions, excluding cases of rape, incest, or to save the woman's ...

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Jennifer Thomas: ‘Breast Cancer Can’t Steal our Ability to Sparkle Radiantly’


Jennifer Thomas breast cancer survivor san antonio

By Jennifer Thomas San Antonio, Texas, Cancer Survivor I had just turned 39 when I reached over my shoulder to turn off a lamp, and in so doing, felt a funny “spot” on my breast. Having no history of cancer in my family, I can’t say that was my first thought. But since it WAS October—Breast Cancer Awareness Month—I did call my husband into the living room to see if he felt it as well. This was late January of 2006. Despite being told by everyone the spot was “probably nothing,” I got it checked out and was diagnosed with Stage 1 IDC, fast-growing (grade 3) by the first week of February. I don’t remember getting a second opinion, doing any research, or even asking what my options were. I just know that a week after being diagnosed, I was in surgery ...

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Latino Undercount in 2020 Census Could Cost States Billions in Family Assistance


Latino undercount in 2020 Census

An undercount of Latinos in the 2020 Census could cost 37 states hundreds of millions in federal funding. For example, a Latino undercount could cost Texas up to $14 billion of federal money for housing, child and foster care, and other family aid programs, according to a new brief from Child Trends. “The impact of any Census undercount will be felt in state budgets and communities throughout the country,” according to the Child Trends report. “At stake is federal funding for programs that help states improve the well-being of their residents, and their children especially.” Why Is a Latino Undercount Expected? Historically, the Census has undercounted Latinos. For the 2020 Census, even without a citizenship question, officials expect a 3% or more undercount of Latinos, ...

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#SaludTues 9/10/19: Promoting a Healthy Weight For All Kids!


Children Running Obesity Prevention

All kids deserve to live in conditions that are safe a conducive to good health, yet many Latino children live in communities with poor access to healthy food and green space, attend schools that lack opportunities for physical activity, and suffer from adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), which may put them at risk for a number of health conditions, including having an unhealthy weight. Currently, at least 1 in 5 U.S. children are classified as obese. Among Latino and African American rates of children at an unhealthy weight are even higher. September is national childhood obesity prevention month, let's chat solutions and work to create a healthier future for our children. WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: "Promoting a Healthy Weight For All Kids" TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 ...

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Did Obamacare Reduce Gaps in Latino Health Insurance Coverage?



When the Obama administration passed the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010, one of its main goals was to expand healthcare insurance access, especially to uninsured, mid- to low-income Americans — a classification in which many Latinos find themselves. Since that time, the ACA provided millions of Americans with health insurance coverage, primarily through an expansion of Medicaid eligibility and subsidies for private coverage purchased through the legislation’s marketplaces. The ACA has expanded and improved coverage options for people without access to a job-based health plan, the law mostly left the employer market alone. "All racial groups have experienced substantial increases in their health insurance coverage," Algernon Austin, with the Center for Global Policy Solutions ...

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Texas Increased the Number of School Marshals by 325% in Last Year


Texas School Safety

Texas is one of five states that allows non-security school employees to carry firearms in schools—with permission and training. With 80 hours of training, these armed school employees are known as school marshals. In the past year, the number of school marshals in Texas increased by 325%, according to a new school safety state report released by Governor Greg Abbott. It provides an update on the state’s progress on recommendations made in the School Safety Action Plan, released in May 2018. Improving School Safety? Since the publication of the action plan, Texas passed 20 bills and appropriated $339 million to improve school safety. There is some disagreement as to which recommendations, and subsequent legislation, will be the most effective. For example, two 2018 ...

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Action Pack: Start ‘Handle With Care’ So Police Notify Schools if Kids Exposed to Trauma!


Handle With Care police schools trauma 3

Some kids witness domestic violence or murder. Some see loved ones hurt in accidents. These kids still have to go to class, carrying a burden of stress and trauma that can interfere with their behavior and grades—in schools that aren’t even aware there’s an issue. Fortunately, you can help these kids. Download the free Salud America! “Handle With Care Action Pack.” The Action Pack helps police, school, and mental healthcare leaders start the Handle with Care program, in which police notify schools when they encounter children at a traumatic scene, so schools can provide support right away. GET THE ACTION PACK! The Action Pack was created by Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, director of the Salud America! Latino health equity program at UT Health San Antonio and Andrea Darr, ...

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