Environmental Racism Causes People of Color to Face Compound Exposures


Environmental Racism Compound Exposure

Climate change is not and will not impact all people equally — Latinos and other minority groups shoulder the most significant threats. Worse, cities in the U.S. are illustrating that fact today, according to a recent study from the University of Michigan. Their research shows that climate change subjects minority communities to high risks of chemical and environmental exposures. “A key finding of this report is that environmental injustice exists across Michigan, with residents of low-income and minority communities disproportionately burdened by environmental contamination and health risks—just as we saw in Flint,” Paul Mohai, a professor at the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability, told Michigan News. Latinos, who already experience harm at ...

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Anchor It: Protect Kids from Dangerous Furniture Tip-Overs


Anchor it furniture tv tip-overs dangerous child

Sadly, a parent's worst nightmare can happen. One child dies every 11 days on average when a TV or furniture falls onto him or her, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, which created the Anchor It! safety campaign. But there are ways to prevent this tragedy from becoming a reality. Why Do Tip-Over Incident Happen? Unsecured TVs, furniture, and appliances lurk in every room. The biggest problem is balance. "When someone pulls a dresser drawer open ... the furniture's center of gravity shifts outward along with it," according to a report by Popular Science. "A weight hung on an open drawer versus one hung on a closed drawer could have significantly different effects—the open drawers make it much more likely to tip." Tall furniture is required to come ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 8/27: How to ‘Handle With Care’ Students Exposed to Childhood Trauma


Handle With Care Tweetchat

60% of U.S. children have been exposed to violence, crime, or abuse. These kids still have to go to class, carrying a burden of stress and trauma that can interfere with their behavior and grades. And schools aren’t aware there’s an issue. Fortunately, our new “Handle With Care Action Pack,” which will be released on Aug. 26, 2019, will help police and schools start a Handle With Care program. This enables police to notify school districts when they encounter a child at a traumatic scene, so school personnel and mental health partners can provide appropriate trauma-sensitive interventions. Let’s use #SaludTues on August 27, 2019, to tweet about steps schools, communities, and healthcare professionals can start a Handle With Care program and take steps to become more ...

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Webinar: How to Start ‘Handle With Care’ to Help Students Who Suffer Trauma


Handle With Care Webinar

You are invited to join a national webinar to find out how you can start a “Handle With Care” program in your town to support students who experience violence and traumatic events. The webinar, “How to Start ‘Handle with Care’ in 5 Simple Steps,” is set for 11 a.m. ET on Aug. 26, 2019. Webinar speakers will explore: Handle With Care, a program that activates police to notify schools when they encounter children at a traumatic scene, so schools can provide trauma-sensitive support right away. The program was begun the West Virginia Center for Children’s Justice in 2013. The free Salud America! “Handle With Care Action Pack” with materials and technical assistance to help local police, school, and mental health leaders start a local Handle with Care program. ...

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Apply Now: $25,000 RWJF Culture of Health Prize


RWJF Culture of Health Prize 2020

A culture of health is where everyone has a fair, just opportunity to be as healthy as possible. Is your community creating a Culture of Health? If so, apply for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Culture of Health Prize! The contest provides $25,000 to communities that unite neighborhood, school, and business partners to improve health for all residents. Read about 2018 Winners In 2018, two majority-Latino communities earned two of the four prize winners. RWJF chose San Antonio, Texas (63.6% Latino) and Cicero, Ill. (88.8% Latino) from about 200 applicants. Eatonville, Fla., and Klamath County, Ore., also won. Salud America!, our national network to promote Latino health equity and healthy change led by Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, is excited to be stationed at UT Health ...

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Award Finalist: Dr. Amelie Ramirez’s Latino Cancer Research Training Program


Exito Latino Cancer Collage

For the second year in a row, Éxito! Latino Cancer Research Leadership Training has been named a finalist for Excelencia in Education’s “Examples of Excelencia” that spotlight evidence-based practices that support Latino students in higher education. Éxito! and 15 other finalists were chosen from 166 applications. Winning “Examples of Excelencia” in four categories—associate, baccalaureate, graduate, and community-based organizations—will be announced at Excelencia in Education’s annual Celebración de Excelencia on Oct. 24, 2019, in Washington, D.C. Excelencia in Education is a national group that promotes Latinos in higher education. Éxito! is led by Salud America! director Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez of the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health ...

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Cynthia Delgado: Living Life to the Fullest After Breast Cancer


Cynthia Delgado breast cancer survivor

By Cynthia Delgado San Antonio, Texas, Cancer Survivor At age 43, I was living a life that consisted of routine exercise, healthy eating, and at the weight I had always wanted to be. I had been seeing a breast surgeon routinely every 3 months for at least 1-and-a-half years because I had fibrocystic breast. Mammograms were a part of my life since my early 20s because I always had lumps, i.e., cysts. The older I got, the more cysts would develop. They would grow very big and would be excruciating painful for a minimum of 10 minutes. Because I started getting anywhere from 5-10 cysts on each side, my OBGYN referred me to a specialist. It became routine for the specialist to aspirate them every 3 months, and they would pop up in different places. On May 15, 2015, I went for my ...

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Why Equity in Breastfeeding Matters For Latina Women


Mother breastfeeding her baby in hospital room

You've probably heard of the many health benefits of breastfeeding, but did you know that promoting equity in breastfeeding can be just as important? For many women and babies of color breastfeeding could mean a matter of life and death or sickness and health. Breastfeeding also offers economic benefits. Unfortunately, many mothers face barriers to breastfeeding. Breastfeeding in the Latino Community Although 77% Latina mothers start off breastfeeding, this number drops to 21%, 6 months after giving birth. One of the most common reasons for why women stop breastfeeding is the need to return to work or school. Some women may lack support from their family and peers. Many Latina mothers are also faced with a lack of breastfeeding support from health care providers, and ...

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Report: America Must Address Systematic Racism, Chronic Adversity So All Kids Can Be Healthy



Early experiences can influence a person’s entire life. Specifically, stress due to adversity, poor nutrition, and exposure to environmental toxins can lead to biological changes, which make people more likely to experience physical and mental health problems later in life. Although individual interventions are important for addressing immediate needs, they alone will not advance health equity, according to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report provides science-driven recommendations to address the social, economic, environmental, and cultural determinants of health and early adversity. They say to advance health equity, decision-makers must address the systemic root causes of poor health and chronic ...

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