Why Do Latinos Have a Harder Time Quitting Cigarettes?



Latino adults smoke cigarettes at a lower rate (12.1%) than their white peers (19.4%). However, once they’ve started, Latinos are more likely to keep smoking and only half as likely as whites to successfully quit smoking, according to the UCSF Smoking Cessation Leadership Center. Experts say the reasons why fewer Latinos quit is complex. “You’re looking at a population with fewer alternatives to cope,” David Williams, a public-health professor at Harvard University, told whyy.org. "That makes it harder for them to give up that aid.” 'Hard to Quit' Reason: Little Access to Help Latino smokers lack access to support for quitting smoking. They have the lowest rate of health insurance coverage among racial/ethnic groups. They also experience lower levels of ...

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Texas Kids Are Most Uninsured in America


hispanic kid child girl cough sick no health insurance

The number of U.S. kids without health insurance is rising for the first time in 10 years. Texas has the highest number of children without health insurance in America, according to a new report by Georgetown University Center for Children and Families. The report found that more than 1 in 5 uninsured kids in the U.S. live in Texas, which is 835,000 as of 2017. From 2016 to 2017, Texas saw an increase of 83,000 uninsured kids. This is bad news for Latinos. Latinos, set to be the largest racial/ethnic population in Texas by 2022, are already the most uninsured U.S. group. Latino Kids and the Report This is the second-straight year Texas has had the nation's highest rate of uninsured children. There are many reasons for this, experts say. First, Texas has a greater ...

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Raheem Baraka’s Support Group for Latino Grandparents Raising Grandkids


Raheem Baraka

Family separations. Broken families. Little social support. In these tough times, abuela and abuelo often have to step up a caregivers for young children. That is why Raheem Baraka's Baraka Community Wellness partnered with nonprofit Tree of Life to create a unique support group for Spanish-speaking grandparents who are doubling as caregivers in Boston (19% Latino). "There are many grandparents who are raising their grandchildren," Baraka told Salud America! in July 2018. "There are broken families. There are challenges around our people staying together in highly traumatic and stressful situations." The Need for Grandparents as Caregivers In 2016, a record 64 million people, or 20% of the U.S. population, lived with multiple generations under one roof, according to a recent ...

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Rural Pharmacy Deserts Emerge Across the U.S.


closing of a walgreen's pharmacy from the Anniston Star

Hospital closures have become the norm in many rural areas. Now, rural pharmacies are headed on the same path, according to a U.S. News Report. Over the past 16 years, 1,231 rural, independently pharmacies owned have closed. That's 16% of all rural pharmacies. Fewer than 6,400 pharmacies are left in rural communities. Rural communities that had at least one retail (independent, chain, or franchise) pharmacy in March 2003 had no retail pharmacy in March 2018, according to RUPRI Center for Rural Health Policy Analysis Rural Policy Brief. Residents of rural communities now have to travel great distances for medications and/or turn to mail-order prescriptions that make it impossible for in-person consultation concerning questions about the medication. “Closure of ...

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New Texas Institute Aims to Improve Rural Health



It is a well known fact that where we live plays a vital role in our health, and those who live in rural areas struggle to access quality healthcare. Rural residents are more likely to die from heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, and unintentional injuries than their urban counterparts. In Texas, more than 3 million people live in rural areas, and are more likely to be uninsured, have lower incomes, and higher rates of death from preventive chronic diseases. The Center for Optimizing Rural Health, part of the Texas A&M Rural and Community Health Institute, aims to change all that. Center for Optimizing Rural Health Texas A&M University has been chosen as the sole recipient of a five-year grant, which will fund the Center for Optimizing Rural Health, ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 11/20: Enrolling Latino Families in Healthcare Coverage


Health Overhaul Texas

Only 1 in 10 who enrolled for healthcare coverage via HealthCare.gov were Latino, a lower rate than their black and white peers, according to the federal data. Many Latinos thus miss out on better healthcare access. How can we help? Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2018, to tweet how to help Latino parents and kids get the healthcare coverage they need before the end of Open Enrollment on Dec. 15! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: How to Encourage Latino families to Enroll in Healthcare Coverage TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, November 20th, 2018 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: The National Hispanic Medical Association (@NHMA) OPTIONAL HASHTAGS: #GetCovered #OpenEnrollment ...

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The Rural Broadband Divide


Wifi access road sign concept in rural area Internet broadband

In today’s world, fast and dependable Internet is essential to thrive. Want to apply for a job? Application is online only! Want to read the latest health news? Online! Need to do homework or get a tutor? Online! Yet, many in rural areas do not have access to high quality broadband services. 24% of rural adults said that access to high-quality Internet service is problematic in their community, according to an alarming new report from Pew Research Center. Another 34% of rural adults say that internet access is a minor problem. Together, 6 in 10 rural Americans see quality internet access as problem.  Furthermore, 39% of rural Americans, or 23 million people, lack proper broadband access, according to a 2016 report by the Federal Communications Commission ...

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Neighborhood Characteristics Affect Latino Caregivers’ Wellness, Stress



In Latino culture, family is at the heart and center of life. As parents begin to age, children are often expected to become their caregivers. 1 in every 3 U.S. Latino households has at least one family caregiver. These Latino caregivers—mainly women in their 40s—often juggle multiple jobs or leave the workforce entirely to enter, the respectable but high-stress, role of taking care of aging family members. How Do Neighborhood Characteristics Affect Caregivers? Latino caregivers who provide support to older family members and report high levels of neighborhood cohesion, have fewer depressive symptoms than those caregivers living in less cohesive neighborhoods, according to one recent study. The study goes on to highlight the protective role that neighborhood characteristics ...

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Study: Even If Thin, Some Latinos Genetically Predisposed to Diabetes


diabetes

Even if you're thin, you might be genetically at risk for diabetes. A new study, led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Gillings School of Global Public Health, examined data from 9,000 Latino adults ages 21-76 and found that a well-known gene variant linked to Type 2 diabetes—transcription Factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene—also may predispose a person to being leaner. Individuals with the TCF7L2 gene variant may be at risk for Type 2 diabetes even while maintaining a low body weight. The findings is novel, given many individuals with diabetes are obese. "The counterintuitive discovery that some people are predisposed both to being thin and developing Type 2 diabetes refocuses our attention on the need to collect data in diverse populations and across ...

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