7 Reasons Not Everyone Can Just Hop on a Telehealth Video Call


Address Equity in the Telehealth Revolution

Delaying medical care can cause catastrophic health and financial problems. That’s why early in the COVID-19 pandemic, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services temporarily expanded its telehealth coverage so physicians, nurse practitioners, clinical psychologists and licensed clinical social workers would be reimbursed for telehealth services. Other payers followed suit. Unfortunately, not everyone can just hop on a telehealth video call. Many Latinos and other vulnerable populations—older people, people experiencing domestic violence, and families with low income—face insurance, language, health literacy, digital literacy, and digital access barriers to telehealth services. Moreover, telehealth can be challenging for people with autism, intellectual and developmental ...

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Telehealth for Latinos in the Age of Covid-19


Telehealth Latinos Age Covid-19

As shelter-in-place orders swept the U.S. during the coronavirus pandemic, healthcare providers’ implementation of telehealth expanded rapidly. In telehealth sessions, those seeking routine check-ups, mental health care, or other services can meet with their provider virtually using computers or other smart devices. This novel way of treating patients aims to look for ways to deliver care to patients in their homes to limit the transmission of the novel coronavirus. "The current public health emergency and the resulting accelerated growth potential in telehealth services is an opportunity for providers to enhance their care practices and for insurers and policymakers to recognize the value of telemedicine," a recent report from UCLA's Center for the Study of Latino health and ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 6/23: Telehealth for Underserved Communities During COVID-19


#SaludTues Telehealth for underserved communities

To minimize exposure to and transmission of COVID-19, providers have rapidly transitioned to telehealth to care for patients at a distance. However, there is an absence of best practices and necessary infrastructure to expand telehealth services, particularly in underserved and Latino communities. Latinos are particularly vulnerable to this disruption in care for many reasons, such as: they have highest uninsured rates of any racial or ethnic group in the U.S.; they are less likely to have a usual source of health care; they face barriers related to differences in culture, language and beliefs; they are less likely to have broadband subscription than whites; and they face higher rates of COVID-19 due to their jobs in the service industry. Join #SaludTues on June ...

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Mental Health, COVID-19, and Their Impacts on Latinos


Mental Health COVID-19 Impacts Latinos

The current novel coronavirus afflicts more than just the lungs. For Latinos and other people of color, COVID-19 has caused disproportionately higher rates of cases and death, job loss, and other inequitable impacts. These groups are also experiencing more mental health issues than in previous eras, according to Dr. Madeline Aviles-Hernandez, the Outpatient Services Director at the Gándara Center. “This crisis is making life much more difficult for [Latinos, African-Americans and other culturally diverse populations] we serve, including those in recovery and people who have yet to be treated for such problems as anxiety and depression,” Aviles-Hernandez said in a statement. “Minorities have been—and continue to be—less likely to receive mental health ...

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Salud Talks Podcast Episode 29: “Stress and Cancer”


STE29 Stress and Cancer Webpic

Stress has become a part of most of our lives every day as the current novel coronavirus continues to spread throughout the U.S. and the world. Still, feelings of anxiety can lead to other health complications, according to Cathy Samayoa, an adjunct assistant professor at San Francisco State University's Health Equity Research Lab. Samayoa and Dr. Daniel C Hughes, with the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health San Antonio, join Salud Talks to discuss her research into the connections between stress and breast cancer development, and how it impacts some groups more than others. For those who are experiencing higher levels of stress and anxiety during this crisis, please listen to our previous episodes coving these topics, "Mindfulness During an Epidemic," and ...

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Salud Talks Podcast Episode 26: “Mindfulness During an Epidemic”


STE26 webpic Mindfulness During an Epidemic

Last week, we began a discussion on how people across the country are experiencing new levels of anxiety and depression amid this global pandemic. Unique stressors, such as sheltering in place the time or experiencing new financial struggles, are causing issues in most homes throughout the U.S. While these problems might not be resolved in the near future, as civic and business leaders deal with the consequences of the outbreak, it is essential that Latinos and all Americans find ways to battle back against these mental health complications. Dr. Sarah Knoeckel, a Nurse Practitioner and an Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing at UT Health San Antonio returns to discuss how mental health should not be stigmatized and how we all can practice wellness techniques. Check out ...

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Salud Talks Podcast Episode 25: “Mental Health and the Global Pandemic”


STE25 Webpic Mental health and the global pandemic

The coronavirus outbreak has caused severe changes to the fabric of our society. Many Americans are now facing shelter in place orders, new work from home routines, and other alterations to everyday life. These shifts, as well as the pandemic itself, are forcing us all to grapple with new problems and begin to ask further questions. One issue that is at the forefront of many healthcare providers' minds is something most might not have considered being an issue before: mental health. Whether someone has or has not experienced complications such as depression and anxiety, Dr. Sarah Knoeckel, a Nurse Practitioner and an Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing at UT Health San Antonio, joins Salud Talks to discuss mental health and how everyone can identify when we are not mentally ...

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The Rise in Youth Substance Misuse & Suicide (and What to Do about It)


youth substance misuse suicide rates report 2019

Youth suicides have spiked over the last decade, and substance misuse is exacting a heavy toll on teens, according to a new report. The report from Trust for America’s Health and Well Being Trust, Addressing a Crisis: Cross-Sector Strategies to Prevent Adolescent Substance Use and Suicide, indicates that trends are worse for racial/ethnic, gender, and other minority youth. The report also highlights emerging approaches to help put youth on healthy pathways into adulthood. "Adolescence is a challenging time when the impact of poverty, discrimination, bullying and isolation can be intense," said John Auerbach, head of Trust for America’s Health, in a statement. "Fortunately, there are policies and programs that can reduce some of these circumstances and the risks associated ...

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Study: Just Being a Minority Can Worsen Your Mental Health


young latina stress depression

Merely being a minority person of color can be worse for your mental health than low income or experiencing neighborhood violence. Puerto Rican teens and young adults growing up in the South Bronx of New York City are more likely to experience anxiety and depression than their peers growing up in San Juan, Puerto Rico, says a new study in World Psychiatry. Both of these groups live in similar conditions — the big difference is the youth in New York grow up as a minority. “How others interact with you as a minority can affect your mental health and how you see yourself,” said lead author Dr. Margarita Alegria of the Disparities Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital. Members of minority groups often experience racism and discrimination. They also hold the idea ...

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