Is Secondhand Smoke and Thirdhand Smoke Linked to Coronavirus Transmission?


Coronavirus Transmission Thirdhand Smoke Secondhand

Researchers are worried about COVID-19 transmission from asymptomatic smokers and vapers to others in their household via secondhand and thirdhand smoke and aerosol. Let’s explore what this means. Why Are Researchers Concerned about COVID-19 and Smoking? Smokers are already at risk of more severe cases of coronavirus. But even in the homes of asymptomatic but infected smokers and vapers, coronaviruses can attach to secondhand smoke and secondhand aerosol particles and droplets. These viral secondhand exhalations, coughs, and sneezes can travel up to 27 feet, land on surfaces, survive for hours, and may increase transmission of COVID-19 to older and younger non-smokers in the home, according to researchers in Environmental Science and Technology. The risk remains even up to ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 5/26: How to Equitably Share Streeets During COVID-19


Share the Streets Hoboken

Medical and public health experts agree that being active outside is crucial to maintaining physical and mental health. However, overcrowding in parks, sidewalks, and on trails can become a serious issue during COVID-19. Pedestrian safety is also a serious issue because although vehicle travel is down, crashes and fatalities are up. Cities across the world are responding by temporarily reallocating street space for people walking, biking, rolling, and skating to practice physical distancing from others. Everyone deserves safe places to be physically active and safe routes to get to essential destinations. Let’s use #SaludTues on May 26, 2020, to tweet about the importance of equitably sharing streets during a crisis problem.   WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “How to ...

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Coronavirus Complicates Homelessness, Which Could Rise 45%


homeless coronavirus mask wearing street homelessness

The COVID-19 pandemic is having a devastating impact on homelessness. People who experience homelessness are transient. That makes it harder to detect, track, and prevent disease transmission, and treat those who need care. Now some experts say rising unemployment could spark a 45% rise in homelessness by the end of 2020, leaving 800,000 people with no permanent shelter in the U.S., the L.A. Times reports. "If the projections of unemployment being made now turn out to be accurate, and the relationship between unemployment and homelessness follows the historical pattern, and no other major changes occur, that’s what we can expect to happen," said economist Dr. Brendan O’Flaherty of Columbia University. Concerns for the Homeless amid Coronavirus People experiencing ...

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Eric Cooper: How San Antonio Food Bank Feeds People Amid Coronavirus


Eric Cooper directs the San Antonio Food Bank to Help Feed Families amid Coronavirus

Eric Cooper knows what it's like to depend on public assistance programs. He grew up in a low-income family, relying on free school meals and food assistance to get enough food to eat. Today, as CEO of the San Antonio Food Bank, Cooper helps families like his. And with rising amounts of food insecurity amid the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, he led the Food Bank to orchestrate a whole new way of operating. An army of volunteers has stepped up to meet the needs of so many, by working in back-to-back shifts and implementing new strategies, such as drive-through pickup lines or COVID-19 preparation kits. Their efforts have garnered national acclaim and have turned a crisis into a rallying point for those who need it most. "I think all of us, as human beings find ourselves in ...

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We Need Healthier Communities to Overcome COVID-19


Edmonds Washington Share Streets

Preparing for and overcoming any disaster, such as the current coronavirus pandemic, requires healthy and resilient communities. However, after age, obesity is the biggest risk factor for being hospitalized with COVID-19. And the U.S. has one of the highest obesity rates in the world, with drastic disparities among racial/ethnic groups, including the highest rates among Latinos. To beat COVID-19, we need healthier communities that prevent obesity and leaders who prioritize equitable access to healthy food, housing, and safe spaces to walk and bike instead of space for cars. “We in the U.S. have not always identified obesity as a disease, and some people think it’s a lifestyle choice. But it’s not,” said Dr. Matthew Hutter, director of the Weight Center at Massachusetts ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 5/12: How COVID-19 Impacts Homelessness


homeless foster care student

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to sicken people and worsen health inequities in income, housing, food, and more. The homeless and housing-unstable are at particular risk. Let’s use #SaludTues on May 12, 2020, to tweetchat about how the coronavirus is affecting homelessness and what we can do about it! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “How COVID-19 Impacts Homelessness” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST Tuesday, May, 12, 2020 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS:  Public Health Maps (@PublicHealthMap) and Enterprise (EnterpriseNow) OPTIONAL HASHTAGS: #COVID19 We’ll open the floor to research, your experiences, stories, and best practices as we explore: How is the coronavirus outbreak affecting homelessness? How big is the ...

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How Advocates Campaigned for 1st Protected Bike Lane Law


advocating for protected bike lanes

Nathanael Fillmore felt his life was in danger every time he rode his bike on unsafe streets to his job as a computer scientist in Cambridge, Mass. (9.2% Latino). So he took action. Fillmore helped launch the Cambridge Bicycle Safety group, and they eventually pushed Cambridge to become the first U.S. city with a municipal law mandating construction of a network of permanent, protected bike lanes on local roads. They did it in three big steps: Build public support on an issues through community organizing Translate public support into political support Use political support to pass a law “Our focus was to work with elected officials to pass legal binding policy to change structural environment among staff and get network of protected bike lanes built out,” ...

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Report: Increasing SNAP Benefits Only Helps the Economy


Increasing SNAP Benefits Helps Economy

Food stamps began in America during another national crisis, the Great Depression — now, during the coronavirus pandemic, government programs are advocating for expansion. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) received a big increase in federal support from the USDA on Wednesday. Moreover, a recent report from the Robert Wood Johnson’s Healthy Eating Research program shows that this kind of investment only helps families and the American economy. “In a time of economic uncertainty, increasing SNAP benefits is a proven policy approach to stimulate the economy, reduce economic hardship, and improve health,” the report states. “Future federal recovery policy approaches should consider SNAP’s proven ability to lift people out of poverty, purchase healthy food, ...

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Fizz Win: Soda Tax Revenue Turns into Emergency Grocery Vouchers amid Coronavirus


soda tax grocery store voucher coronavirus pandemic

A soda tax aims to reduce sugary drink consumption and boost public health. In a new twist, Seattle is using soda tax revenues to give emergency $800 grocery vouchers for 6,250 families amid the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, Next City reports. City leaders mailed a $400 voucher in March 2020 for families to buy groceries at Safeway. They will send a second $400 voucher this month. Mayor Jenny Durkan called this rapid-response to coronavirus "remarkable." “As schools and child care facilities close, we need to do everything we can to support families and ensure they can put food on the table,” Durkan said, Next City reports. Sugary drinks do not contribute to good health, especially among Latinos, according to a Salud America! research review. Let's examine how soda ...

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