Introduction & Methods: Latino Housing, Transportation, and Green Space


tower of affordable housing

This is part of the Salud America! The State of Latinos and Housing, Transportation, and Green Space: A Research Review » Abstract Across the United States, Latino communities vary in affordable housing, safe and adequate transit, parks and open green space, and other elements that are necessary to fully thrive and achieve health equity. These differences in opportunity result in health disparities between different zip codes or census tracts—with poor health outcomes more prevalent in communities of color and low-income communities. It is perhaps even more critical to address these underlying social, economic, and environmental factors that contribute to health than to address the health disparities directly if we are to hope for long term changes in community health and ...

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Tell EPA: Close the Water Pollution Loophole!


EPA groundwater loophole

In another move to reduce clean water protections, the EPA plans to enact another ruling that will make it easier for companies to remove hazardous waste through dumping. This proposed directive would limit the protections of our rivers and lakes by allowing a loophole with greater flexibility for corporations to eliminate toxic waste by polluting the groundwater, according to Clean Water Action. This plan follows in the footsteps of the agency’s recently proposed “Dirty Water Rule,” and is part of a seemingly wide-reaching effort to reduce environmental protection efforts. The EPA wants your opinion on this proposed rule by June 7, 2019! Email a Comment Now for Clean Water! Dear EPA Office of Wastewater Management, Access to clean water should be a foremost ...

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Preemption Toolkit Promotes Equity


Preemption

Federal, state officials have the ability to determine the legislative powers of smaller government bodies. While the distribution of federal and local power has been up for debate since the constitution's creation, one thing is clear: Preemptive laws have the ability to restrict lawmakers' capacity to propose, pass, and enact bills and acts that help the people they serve. However, Voices for Healthy Kids has available a preemption toolkit that will help communities promote health, well-being, and equity. What is Preemption Law? Preemption laws are those that come from a congressional body and give smaller governmental agencies no choice in their implementation. In other words, a higher form of government can limit a lower form of government from taking action on an ...

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E-Cigarettes: Nicotine’s Newest Red Herring


Vape chemical risk

For years, tobacco companies gained profits through lies and deception — now, e-cigarette producers are following in their predecessors’ footsteps, health experts say. Since its inception, vape manufacturers like Juul promoted their products as a “safer” alternative to smoking cigarettes, and even as a way to gradually quit smoking altogether. However, there is no substantial evidence backing these claims. Studies are actually beginning to show the exact opposite. The overall lack of knowledge concerning e-cigs is a notable risk to users, according to the FDA’s former Commissioner, Scott Gottlieb, and current Principal Deputy Commissioner, Amy Abernethy. “While we believe that currently addicted adult smokers who completely switch off of combustible tobacco and ...

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#SaludTues 5/14: State of Latino Housing, Transportation & Green Space


5_14 Tweetchat_ Housing, Transportation Greenspace (1)

Where you live matters for health. However, Latinos face unaffordable housing, unreliable public transportation, and a lack of green space, which limits access to health-promoting assets. To drive solutions, Salud America! will unveil a new research review, “The State of Latino Housing, Transportation, and Green Space,” at the #SaludTues Tweetchat at 1 p.m. ET May 14, 2019. The new research review will cover the latest data on how differences in housing, transportation, green space opportunities contribute to health inequities among Latinos. The review also highlights strategies and policies to improve neighborhood health equity, where everyone has a fair and just opportunity to achieve the best health possible. Join #SaludTues at 1 p.m. ET May 14, 2019, to tweet about the ...

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Largest Land Owner in Atlanta Opens Green Space to the Public


School-playground-gated-and-closed-after-school-hours

Children and families in underserved communities have limited to access to green spaces and parks. However, one of the highest costs for creating a park is land acquisition. So, the largest land and property owner in Atlanta (4.6% Latino) —Atlanta Public Schools—is launching a new pilot program to open their green spaces to the public outside of operating hours. Atlanta’s Need for Parks The Trust for Public Land, a national nonprofit, ranks the largest 100 cities in the U.S. by how well those municipalities are meeting the public need for parks. Atlanta ranks 43rd on that list. Only two-thirds of the population live within a ten-minute walk of a public park. In Minneapolis and Minnesota, however, 97% of the population can reach a park in a ten-minute walk. Fewer ...

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Washington State Passes Comprehensive Toxic Chemicals Bill


Washington State chemical bill

Last month, Washington (12.7% Latino) state lawmakers approved far-reaching chemical legislation, which will regulate toxic substances in consumer products. The bill, which is awaiting signature from Governor Jay Inslee, aims to implement harmful chemical identification, restriction, and prohibition efforts. Toxic-free advocates are describing the law as one of the most substantial pieces of regulatory legislation in the country. “Washington state’s legislature has taken bold action to protect public health and the environment from the dangers of toxic chemicals,” said Liz Hitchcock, leader of Safer Chemicals Healthy Families, in a press release. “Other states and the federal government should follow their lead.” What Does the Bill Entail? The Pollution Prevention for ...

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Phoenix Children’s Hospital: Creating a Culture of Bike Safety for Latino and All Kids


Injury prevention specialist, Juan Tarango created a six-week, hands-on bike safety course for fourth grade students in Phoenix, AZ.

Juan Tarango of Tempe, Arizona, has been an avid cyclist for over 30 years. For him, it’s about exploring, exploring his city, state, country and even other countries. He loves to see kids ride bicycles, having fun and getting physical activity. But he hated seeing how many kids show up with bike-related injuries at the Phoenix Children’s Hospital ER where he worked. “One kid─wasn’t going fast, wasn’t doing tricks─falls, hits his head, and ends up with life-changing brain injury,” Tarango said. Tarango wanted to help. He wondered: What could he do to teach Latino and all kids bicycle safety behaviors, and thus reduce  bike-related injuries? Children, Bicycling, and Injuries Bicycling is good for your health. For kids, it can help develop muscle ...

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Could Accessory Dwelling Units Help Affordable Housing Crises?



The American housing market is at its least affordable in 10 years. Home prices in California (39.1% Latino), which are among the highest in the U.S., have risen due to the state's rapid population growth and construction efforts being unable to keep up. In Los Angeles County (48.6%), more than 15,000 individuals live in cars, vans, and mobile homes — it is home to the country’s highest number of unsheltered homeless people. Yet, more than half the land Los Angeles and San Fransisco is filled by neighborhoods in which 90% of housing units are single-family homes, according to a recent New York Times report. In hopes of helping reduce these problems, the California state legislature passed numerous reforms reducing regulations on accessory dwelling units over the past two ...

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