Take a Stand to End Over-Policing in Walking and Biking Initiatives



The Safe Routes to School National Partnership (Safe Routes) is raising awareness to end over-policing as a safety solution in walking and biking initiatives. Racial profiling by police, for example, threatens drivers, pedestrians, and cyclists of color. These Latinos and other minorities, who already face less safe roads and fewer places to walk and bike, deal with a greater burden of traffic and pedestrian violations, too. Safe Routes wants you to stand up for minorities by sharing on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram. “As walk and bike advocates, we need to come together to protect people in communities made vulnerable not only by missing and poorly maintained bike lanes and sidewalks and inequitable policies, but also by over-policing,” wrote Holly Nickel, coalitions and ...

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Heat Maps Help Hospital Workers Find Best Multimodal Commutes



Vehicles. Carpools. Bicycles. Public transit. Feet. What’s the best way to commute to work? For workers at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, new heat map technology is planning out their optimal commute route in hopes of saving people time and money─and increasing the use of multimodal transportation options that are good for health and the environment. The new technology, Modeify, is being used by Arlington Transportation Partners and Mobility Lab to help hospital workers learn multimodal commute options they may not know about. “Modeify makes it easy for commuters to see the health, financial, and environmental advantages of switching from driving their own car to sustainable transportation options,” according to Mobility Lab. How Modeify Works Modeify is ...

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New Videos Help Latinas Address Mental Health Issues



Mental health is a rising concern in the United States. For Latina women, the concerns become even more dire. Research has shown that Latinas receive less mental health care than whites, even if they have insurance. They also report more symptoms of depression and anxiety than whites. However, what if there was a better way to reach them? Latina women have a higher than average use of smartphones and the Internet. Technology could be the answer. A recent study from UCLA found that culturally tailored media programming can encourage Latina women to seek help for mental health, as well as decrease their symptoms of anxiety and depression. The researchers developed a digital storytelling series featuring a fictional young Latina woman named "Catalina" that is dealing with ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 10/31: Fall into Healthy & Safe Holidays


Parent Taking Children Trick Or Treating At Halloween

Did you know that 40% of Latino children are overweight or obese, compared to 32% of all U.S. children? With the Fall holidays bringing kids out of school and closer to candy and sweets, this is a critical time to make sure they have safe and healthy spaces to play, trick or treat, and achieve a healthy weight! Let’s use #SaludTues on Oct. 31, 2017, to share how what we can do for Latino and all families to improve health and stay safe during the Fall holiday season! WHAT: #SaludTuesTweetchat: Fall into Healthy & Safe Holidays TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: SafeRoutes (@SafeRoutesNow) and others We’ll open the floor to your stories, tips and experiences, as we ...

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Study: Young Latinos, Not Immigrants, Face Most Discrimination


Sad young woman

Young Latino men born in the U.S. reported experiencing high levels of discrimination, according to a new study. Penn State researchers examined reported discrimination among 1,275 Latinos and 500 whites in Los Angeles County. They found the highest reporters of discrimination in both interpersonal and institutional contexts were young, U.S.-born Latino men, according to a news release. Surprisingly, both undocumented and documented Latino immigrants and older U.S.-born Latinos reported lower levels of discrimination. 'What ends up happening to young, U.S.-born Latinos is that they have higher expectations for inclusion than other Latino groups and greater awareness of unfair treatment and blocked opportunities," said Nancy Landale, professor of sociology and demography at ...

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UC Irvine is the ‘Most Popular’ University in CA for Latinos



Latinos have made great strides in education in recent years, with more enrolling two- and four-year colleges and universities than ever before. Despite these gains, there is still a significant gap between Latinos and other racial and ethnic minorities in obtaining college degrees. Many universities around the country are coming up with new and innovative approaches to not only increase the enrollment of Latino students, but to also help them succeed when they get on campus. In all, 492 campuses in 19 states and Puerto Rico have been designated Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs), which allows them to apply for about $100 million annually in federal research grants. For the University of California – Irvine campus, these strategies have begun to pay off. The Irvine (10.05% ...

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Classes in Illinois Look to Empower Latino Parents



Latinos are already the largest and youngest racial and ethnic minority group in the United States. The health and success of this growing population will be key to the overall prosperity of the country. Groups across the country have found numerous innovative ways to help Latinos obtain access to the resources available to them. In DeKalb, IL (12.81% Latino population) the Universidad para Padres (Parents University) program was formed to help parents in the area “take active roles in their own personal growth and their children’s academic success.” The program, which consisted of 22 sessions, was organized by Northern Illinois University (NIU) and covered a variety of topics. These included bilingual options for K-12 education to health promotion and applying for ...

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Univ. of Michigan to offer free tuition to some in-state students



Obtaining an education is one of the key social determinants of health. While Latinos have made great strides in this area in recent years – high school dropout rates are at an all-time low and two- and four-year college enrollments for Latinos is at an all-time high – Latinos still lag behind other racial and ethnic minorities in obtaining college degrees. The University of Michigan recently announced an initiative that could help many of the state’s Latino and low-income families achieve their goal of going to college. The school’s Board of Regents passed a program that will give free tuition for families who live in the state of Michigan (4.72% Latino population) and earn less than $65,000 per year. Dubbed the “Go Blue Guarantee,” the program will launch on January 1, ...

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What is the Fittest City in America?



Where you live has an undeniable impact on your overall health. Lack of access to spaces for physical activity, healthy food choices, and health care options often plague those that live in low-income neighborhoods. This includes many Latino families. This confluence of conditions often lead to residents becoming overweight and/or obese and suffering from diabetes, respiratory illnesses, and heart disease. In recent years, cities – often finding governments working with residents – have begun exploring ways to make cities healthier. This has included improving access to repairing sidewalks, adopting shared use agreements, and creating physical activity opportunities in public spaces. All of these efforts have not gone unnoticed. The fitness tracking application, Fit Bit, has ...

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