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Report: How to Promote Health Equity for Latinos


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Imagine a world where every person has the opportunity to attain full health potential—with no disadvantages due to race, money, etc. That is health equity. Unfortunately, Latinos and other people of color often struggle with health inequity as a result of poverty, structural racism, and discrimination. This causes gaps in how long Latinos live and how they struggle with disease and health, compared to their peers, according to the new Communities in Action: Pathways to Health report from thew National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The new report does have some good news: Communities have agency to promote health equity. However, community-based solutions are necessary but not sufficient. Supportive public and private policies at all levels and ...

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Poll: More than 3 in 4 Latinos Say Latinos Face Discrimination


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Three in four U.S. Latinos (78%) believe Latinos face discrimination in America today, compared to 92% of blacks and 55% of whites who say they face discrimination, according to a new poll. Who is doing the discriminating? Nearly half of Latinos (47%) believe personal prejudice is the bigger problem. A smaller amount (37%) say say discrimination based in laws and government policies is the bigger problem. About 14% say they're equally problematic. The data is from a new poll by National Public Radio (NPR), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. "Basically what we have found is that discrimination is a type of stressful life experience that has negative effects on health similar to other kinds of stressful experiences," ...

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Study: 1 in 4 Latino Kids Have an Undocumented Immigrant Parent



Nearly 94% of the 18 million Latino kids living in the United States today were born here. Their moms and dads are a different story. About half of Latino kids have at least one parent who was born outside of the U.S., and about four million of these also have at least one parent who is not authorized to be in the country, according to new data from the National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families. The new data have big implications for the wellness of these children. Immigration, Kids, and Mental Health Living with the threat of deportation and the separation from a parent can harm a child. It may cause “fear or anxiety that can affect children's physical and mental health, as well as their development,” the new data shows. One in four Latino kids are ...

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Tick Tock: The Impact of DACA on Latinos


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President Donald Trump's administration recently rescinded the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), an American immigration policy signed by President Barack Obama five years ago. DACA allows unauthorized immigrants who arrived in the United States as children to work, go to school, and get a driver’s license without fear of deportation. The clock is now ticking for a Congressional fix for people who qualify for DACA. If not, recipients could lose their status starting March 5, 2018. Who are DACA recipients? Since the program started in June 2012, most DACA recipients are in Latino-centric states: California (222,795) followed by Texas (124,000) and Illinois (42,376). Unauthorized immigrants from Mexico make up more than three-quarters of all DACA ...

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Latino Immigrant Families Often Forego Health Care Services



For many immigrant families, the current political climate adds a great deal of stress to their lives. Many Latinos already face inequities in health care; they are still the largest uninsured population in the U.S. In South Carolina (5.2% Latino population), this stress is now manifesting in even harsher ways. According to a report in The Post and Courier, many immigrant families in the state are not only foregoing health care services for the adult family members, but also their children. “We’ve gotten calls from the health department of mothers not coming to ... appointments, not showing up for immunizations,” said Julie Smithwick, executive director of the Latino assistance group PASOs. The statewide group connects Latino patients to health care resources across South ...

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Salud America! Wins International Marketing and Communications Awards


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We at Salud America! care about improving Latino health. That’s why we're excited to announce we have won three Communicator Awards for our efforts to promote awareness of and solutions to Latino health issues! 2017 Communicator Award of Excellence, Content & Marketing Campaign—Branded Social Campaign, Salud America! Latino Health Campaign 2017 Communicator Award of Distinction, Website (Health), Salud America! 2017 Communicator Award of Distinction, Copy or Writing for Websites, Salud America! Communicator Awards, presented by the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts, honor international marketing and communications that "transcends innovation and craft" and made a "lasting impact." Salud America!, formerly called SaludToday, is led by Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, ...

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New Grant Awarded to Help Latino Immigrant Health



Latinos face many inequities in attaining quality and affordable healthcare. Cultural and language barriers are often in place keeping many Latinos, especially Latino immigrants, from getting the healthcare that they need. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded over $950,000 in funds to George Washington University to research health disparities among the Latino immigrant and refugee communities. “The changing demographics of the U.S. population in which recent immigrants are playing a key role in population growth have and will continue to exert a major influence on the course of health disparities,” the grant abstract stated. In order to reduce health disparities, it is critical to address inequities in programs, practices, and policies. Join our site, connect ...

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Pennsylvania Group Helps Latino College Students



Many millennials have been the beneficiary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program which allows certain undocumented immigrants who entered the country before their 16th birthday and before June 2007 to receive a renewable two-year work permit and exemption from deportation. However, many young immigrants “feel alone” or are unaware of their options during the immigration process, Al Día News, reports. Obstacles ranging from a lack of access and information to a lack of healthcare and public schools impede the academic progress of many undocumented students. Even a lack of knowledge about college or college-access programs have been obstacles for many. In order to reduce health disparities, it is critical to address inequities in programs, practices, ...

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