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Watch Webinar: Overcoming Implicit Bias in the Doctor’s Office and Research Studies



Doctors often have implicit, subconscious preferences for white patients over those of color, studies show. This is implicit bias. These biases — stereotypes that affect our understanding and decisions about others beyond our conscious control — lead to discrimination and health disparities. To address this issue, you’re invited to join us for "Overcoming Implicit Bias in the Doctor’s Office and Research Studies," at 2 p.m. CT on April 25, 2022. This is the third webinar of a new series, “Let’s Address Health Equity Together.” This Zoom webinar will feature guest speakers to help health care professionals understand implicit bias, “rewire” it toward compassion for patients and research participants of color and engage local leaders in implementing implicit bias ...

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Women Comment on How COVID-19 Is Impacting Women’s Health


latina covid

The National Institute of Health (NIH) Office of Research on Women’s Health is seeking comments on how to improve treatment for the intersection of women’s health and COVID-19. COVID-19 has impacted all women, but Latinas have been consistently at high risk. Not only has the disease disproportionately hit this population, but it also has caused delays in screenings and care for other women’s health issues. Responses will be accepted through Friday May 6, 2022. Update 5/20/22: 10 women submitted comments. See a sampling of comments below. Comments Submitted by Women via Salud America! Here are a few comments submitted to the NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health: "I had Covid in December with pneumonia. I was in bed for two and a half weeks and thought I was ...

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Contact Time: What is It and How Does it Impact Infection Control?


contact time for disinfection cleaning hospital bed with gloves and mask

We know germs can cause illnesses. We also know that frontline healthcare workers can take action to protect themselves, their colleagues, and their patients from infectious disease threats. Cleaning and disinfecting are two of these important actions for infection control. A fundamental part of this process is “contact time.” This is the amount of time a disinfectant must sit on a surface, without being wiped away or disturbed. Contact time allows the disinfectant to do its job: Killing germs. “There are a lot of germs in healthcare. That's no surprise to any of us,” said Dr. Abigail Carlson, an infectious diseases physician with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as part of CDC Project Firstline’s Inside Infection Control video ...

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Know the Facts for Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month!


Know the Facts for Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month!

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. This cancer can affect anyone, but older Latinos may be particularly at risk. Know the facts about colorectal cancer, tips for screening and preventions, and how we can help researchers studying cancer. What Should I Know About Colorectal Cancer? Colorectal cancer is the disease of the colon and/or rectum. “Most cases of colorectal cancer occur in people ages 45 and older, but the disease is increasingly affecting younger people. Each year, about 150,000 Americans are diagnosed with this disease and more than 50,000 die,” according to the Colorectal Cancer Alliance. Many people in the early stages of colorectal cancer do not experience symptoms. However, symptoms might develop later on in the disease. Mayo Clinic lists ...

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Comment Now: Increase Latino Representation in Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials!


comment latino representation in clinical trials alzheimers doctor patient

The National Institute of Aging (NIA) is seeking comments and suggestions on how it can implement community-based research networks to increase diversity in clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD). At Salud America!, we believe that diverse representation is critical in Alzheimer's clinical trials to ensure that health and medical discoveries are equitable for diverse populations. This means increasing diversity among research leaders and clinical trial participants and establishing sustainable connections with Latino communities and other communities of color who have historically been underrepresented in medicine. If you agree, you can endorse Dr. Amelie Ramirez’s comment to NIA. Responses will be accepted through Saturday April 9, ...

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Introducing Clean Hands & Spaces Bilingual Training


Introducing Clean Hands & Spaces Bilingual Training

Did you know that good hand hygiene can result in less gastrointestinal and respiratory illness and fewer missed school days? Good hygiene practices are an important strategy to keep everyone in schools and early care and education (ECE) facilities healthy. But good hygiene practices aren’t always easy to implement in busy educational settings. The good news is that new resources are available to help K-12 and ECE staff learn how to best encourage good hygiene practices in their educational settings. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the CDC Foundation have developed a free, interactive, online training on hand hygiene and cleaning. The Clean Hands and Spaces online training was created specifically for educators, administrators, and supporting ...

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Gregory Aune: The Gear Up Against Kids Cancer Bike Ride


greg aune Gear Up Against Kids Cancer Bike Ride bike ride event

Gregory Aune was 16 when he was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. Aune spent a year enduring grueling treatment, losing over 70 pounds. But he survived. His experience motivated him to pursue a clinical career and help children with cancer. Today, Dr. Aune is an associate professor of pediatric hematology and oncology at the Greehey Children’s Cancer Research Institute (GCCRI) of UT Health San Antonio, on a mission to find new ways to help and heal patients. That's why he helped found the Gear Up Against Kids Cancer Bike Ride — to raise awareness of childhood cancer and support the mission of the GCCRI. The inaugural bike ride will take place at 8 a.m. CT on April 2, 2022, in Floresville, Texas, after having been postponed for two years due to COVID-19. REGISTER ...

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How Does Infection Control Work on COVID-19 Variants Like Omicron?


saludfirstline Infection control covid variants omicron

COVID-19 has changed a lot of practices for frontline healthcare workers, from screening employees and patients at entrances to wearing masks all the time. The pandemic has also taught us more about variants. As a virus like COVID-19 spreads, it can mutate and change — these changes are known as variants, such as the Delta and Omicron variants. New variants of viruses are common. Fortunately, the strategies healthcare workers use for infection control are designed to work regardless of the variant, said Dr. Abigail Carlson, an Infectious Diseases physician with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “The tools that we use for infection control work. And the way they work for COVID-19 hasn't changed,” Carlson said. “It's all the more important to ...

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Salud Talks Episode 39: Prehabilitation and What It Means for Latinos 


saludtalks prehabilitation

Most of us know what rehabilitation is. It is care that can help you get back to normal or improve skills after a disease or injury.   Unfortunately, rehab only takes place retroactively—after there is an issue.   Prehabilitation, however, focuses on health before there is a problem.  Loriana Hernandez-Aldama, an Emmy award-winning journalist, author, and cancer survivor, calls prehabilitation the mental and physical preparation a person can take to achieve good health, from stress reduction to healthier eating.   Loriana Hernandez-Aldama joins the Salud Talks Podcast, Episode 39, to talk about the great need for prehabilitation to help Latinos stay healthy and ready to deal with disease.  LISTEN! WHAT: A #SaludTalks Podcast discussion about prehabilitation ...

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