Rossmary Marquez: From Political Turmoil to Public Health Promotion

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With a strong support network and a tenacious spirit built from escaping political turmoil in her native Venezuela and moving to the United States a decade ago, Rossmary Marquez is persistent in her efforts to improve people’s health.

Marquez completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Oregon and graduated from Texas A&M with a master’s degree in public health.

Her research interests include immigration, health disparities, and minority health. Before starting her master’s degree studies, Marquez worked for the CDC as an emergency risk communicator and was involved in the Ebola and Zika response.

With the Venezuelan charm as a continual reminder of her roots and her path, Marquez goes the extra mile to talk with people about their experiences and how that can inform ways to shape their physical and mental health.

To further her experience and education, Marquez applied for the Éxito! Latino Cancer Research Leadership Training program.

The Éxito! program, led by Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez at UT Health San Antonio with support from the National Cancer Institute, recruits 25 master’s-level students and professionals each year for a five-day summer institute and optional internships to promote doctoral degrees and careers in Latino cancer. A recent study found significant increases in summer institute participants’ confidence to apply to a doctoral program and academic self-efficacy.

“I think the [Éxito!] summer institute allowed me to connect with peers and professionals in the field who can become part of my support system as I apply to a PhD program and continue on with my career,” said Marquez.

 Editor’s Note: This is the story of a graduate of the 2018 Èxito! Latino Cancer Research Leadership Training program at UT Health San Antonio, the headquarters of the Salud America! program. Apply now for Èxito! 2019.

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40

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of Latino kids participate in preschool programs vs. 53% of white kids.

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