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Julia Weis

Julia Weis joined Salud America! and its home base, the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health San Antonio, in September 2020. With a degree in Communication from Trinity University, Julia has previously worked in journalism, marketing, graphic design, and technical writing. She loves biking and hiking in the Central Texas outdoors and is passionate about environmental and social justice issues.


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Articles by Julia Weis

What Latino Parents Should Know about the New Child Tax Credit


What Latino Parents Should Know about the New Child Tax Credit

This week, millions of working families in the U.S. will receive the first payment from the expanded child tax credit implemented by the Biden Administration. “The Child Tax Credit in the American Rescue Plan provides the largest Child Tax Credit ever and historic relief to the most working families ever – and most families will automatically receive monthly payments without having to take any action,” according to the White House website. Although the IRS and banks have been prepping for the credit for months, there is still some confusion on what the tax credit is and who qualifies for it. Here’s what Latino parents need to know about the new child tax credit that will be deposited on July 15, 2021. What is the child tax credit? In March 2021, President Biden signed ...

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Younger Latinos More Likely to Discuss Racism & Discrimination


Younger Latinos More Likely to Discuss Racism & Discrimination

Younger generations of Latinos are more likely than their immigrant parents to talk about issues like racism and discrimination, particularly when it comes to discrimination against Black people. “Most of our societies are fundamentally racist against darker people,” said political science professor Eduardo Gamarra, according to Carmen Sesin and Cora Cervante of NBC Latino. Generation Z, typically defined as those born between 1997 and 2015, may be more willing to confront their immigrant parents about racism because they are more racially diverse than past generations and active in social justice movements. Let’s examine how Latino youth compare to older generations, some characteristics of Generation Z, and the implications for how Latinos can tackle discrimination and ...

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Dorothy Long Parma: Finding Her Career in Gastric Cancer Research While Navigating Mental Health


Dorothy Long Parma

Dr. Dorothy Long Parma hasn’t had the easiest career path. She’s struggled with depression throughout her time in medical school, residency, and her current work as an assistant professor at the Institute of Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at UT Health San Antonio. Although her depression made it very difficult at times, Long Parma successfully completed her degree and is now an expert health disparities researcher focusing on risk factors for gastric cancer. “I really like working at IHPR. I've worked here as a student, and then as faculty and it's been a great supportive environment. Amelie [Ramirez, the director of IHPR] has always been very understanding about me working at the level that I can work,” Long Parma said. From the Philippines to Texas for ...

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Data: Latino Youth Struggled with Mental Health in 2020


Caring mother hugging, comforting depressed upset teenage daughter

2020 was a difficult year for many reasons. The combination of a deadly pandemic, a racial reckoning about police violence, and economic hardships have placed a heavy toll on many families. New research from America’s Promise Alliance and Research for Action shows how 2020 hurt high schoolers and their ability to thrive in school. They found that Latino youth were among the most impacted by the disruptions of 2020. “Young people are stressed and their mental health is suffering—with disproportionate impacts on young women and nonbinary youth, Latinx students, and youth experiencing food insecurity,” according to the report. Let’s examine how COVID-19 and the resurgence in racial justice activism have impacted high schoolers and the implications for Latino youth ...

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Data: Segregation Leads to Lower Income, Life Expectancy for Latinos


Data: Segregation Leads to Lower Income, Life Expectancy for Latinos

Living in segregated cities can have negative impacts on Latino and Black people rather than living in racially diverse areas, according to a new analysis from the University of California Berkeley’s Othering and Belonging Institute. “U.S. Latinos have a higher life expectancy and earn more yearly income when they live in racially mixed neighborhoods compared to areas that are predominantly Black or Latino, an analysis finds,” writes Russell Contreras, according to Axios. The analysis highlights areas with recent increases in segregation and the lasting implications that segregation has on life outcomes for Latino and Black children. What Does the Data Say on Segregation? The UC Berkeley’s Othering and Belonging Institute released a report in June 2021 after years of ...

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Raising Awareness of Disparities for LGBTQ Latinos


Latino LGBTQ pride

June marks LGBTQ Pride Month, which celebrates equality and visibility for the LGBTQ community. For LGBTQ Latinos, that means recognizing identity while raising awareness of disparities in HIV and AIDS treatment, mental health, and workplace discrimination. For some, it also means honoring the victims of the 2016 Orlando shooting at Pulse Nightclub, where most of the 49 victims were LGBTQ Latinos. Pride celebrations may be somewhat limited in various cities due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. But still, LGBTQ Latinos raise awareness and are proud. “For sure, when you are with other people you feel empowered and you feel solidarity. But you cannot cancel true pride. It is the product of many victories and struggles,” said Pedro Julio Serrano, a human rights activist ...

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Data: Latinos Make Up Less than 2% of COVID-19 Media Coverage


Data: Latinos Make Up Less than 2% of COVID-19 Media Coverage

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically impacted Latinos. Latinos have suffered a disproportionate burden of coronavirus cases, hospitalizations, and deaths (especially among young people). But why has media coverage of Latinos and COVID-19 remained lower than other groups, barely making up 2% of all COVID-19 news? A data search conducted by the Berkeley Media Studies Group (BMSG) indicates that Latinos have not been covered by news media in COVID-19 coverage to the extent that other populations like Black people, Native Americans, and women have been covered. Let’s take a look at what the data shows and the implications that a lack of media coverage has on Latinos. What Does the Data Show? The U.S. media produced a whopping 2,073,217 stories on either “covid,” ...

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How Latino Seniors Can Get Help Navigating Healthcare


How Latino Seniors Can Get Help Navigating Healthcare

Latino seniors face many health disparities, including disproportionate rates of disability, Alzheimer’s, cancer, and more. Additionally, they may have trouble communicating with healthcare workers due to bias, discrimination, and lack of bilingual and culturally competent staff. A new resource wants to help elderly Latinos get quality healthcare by helping them navigate Medicare. Anhelo is an online and phone service that Spanish speakers can use to better understand their Medicare coverage options and ensure it meets their needs. Resources like Anhelo, along with other policies, can vastly improve the healthcare experience for Latino seniors. What Problems do Latino Seniors Face in Accessing Healthcare? Many barriers stand in the way of Latino seniors receiving proper ...

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Maria Hernandez: Fighting for Health Equity in Healthcare Organizations



For Maria Hernandez, fighting for health equity hits close to home. When her dad was in the hospital fighting cancer, Hernandez had a realization. “He’s being wheeled into the surgical unit, and he's with me and my mom and my two brothers, and we're all speaking Spanish, wishing him well. And all of a sudden, he puts up his hand and says, ‘Stop, don't speak Spanish, they're going to think I'm stupid, and they're not going to help me.’ And that just took my breath away,” Hernandez said. It made her realize that healthcare organizations must do more to address implicit bias. “Here I was, working on diversity and inclusion issues in major corporations. And I thought, what is healthcare doing about this? And so I started looking into this,” Hernandez ...

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