Ohio Approves New Social and Emotional Learning Standards in Schools!


social and emotional learning school classroom kids

The Ohio State School Board this week approved social and emotional learning (SEL) standards to apply to students in K-12─and hundreds of Ohio educators and Salud America! members submitted comments to help refine those standards. Ohio now is one of only eight states with K-12 SEL standards. These standards aim to help students build emotional awareness, empathy, strong relationships, and responsible decision-making. How did this big change happen? What role did Salud America! and the public have? The Growth of SEL in Ohio Schools Students who get support for social and emotional learning in schools do better academically, socially, behaviorally, and mentally, research shows. SEL is part of a larger plan in Ohio (3.8% Latino) to prepare all students for life after high ...

Read More

Kimberly Hernandez: Still Here, Living Life Fully after Breast Cancer


Kimberly Hernandez breast cancer survivor 1

By Kimberly Hernandez San Antonio Cancer Survivor One night exactly one month after my 31st birthday, I was taking off my bra getting ready for bed and felt a lump. I told my ex wife about it and told me “don’t worry, it’s probably fatty tissue”. I knew it was something more and could tell it was different. We know our bodies. The next day I called my family doctor and made an appointment. When I went in, the physician assistant felt the lump. She asked the usual questions about my age and family history. There is no family history of cancer in my family and she did not think much of it but if I wanted to pursue further testing she would set it up. We proceeded to mammograms, sonograms, x-rays, scans and biopsies within a week’s time. A lot of the time entering the ...

Read More

#SaludTues 6/18: Let’s Celebrate Men’s Health Month!


Latino man music treadmill

Heart disease and cancer are among the leading causes of death for Latino men. Each year over 40% of men in the U.S., are lost to such chronic diseases, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Why do men face higher health risks?   Compared to women, men are often less likely to get preventative screenings or checkups.  Additionally, certain health behaviors related to diet, physical inactivity, and smoking may lead to increased risks of disease.   Certain occupations and exposures may also put men at risk for certain cancers and poor health.   Join us this month for #SaludTues at 1 p.m. ET on June 18, 2019, to celebrate and help promote Men’s Health Month!  WHAT: #SaludTuesTweetchat: “Let's Celebrate Men's Health ...

Read More

Priced Out: How a Brilliant Cartoon Explains the Housing Crisis in San Francisco


characters from the priced out series on housing in san francisco

Media producers Joseph Smooke and Dyan Ruiz have seen the harsh impact of unaffordable housing on Latino families in San Francisco. Rents rise. Wages don't. Latinos get priced out of their homes—forced to move further away from health-promoting assets like jobs, transit, and medical care. Many people don't know why this happens, or what to do. Smooke and Ruiz, who created a media group to advocate for equitable public policies, wanted to empower families who face housing crises and build public demand for solutions. So they went to the drawing board—literally. San Francisco and Unaffordable Housing Looking for an affordable place to live in San Francisco is like searching for a needle in a haystack. Especially in places like the city's Mission District. The ...

Read More

Can Taxing Empty Apartments Help the Affordable Housing Crisis?


Affordable Housing for Seniors- A Reality Check

Some houses, apartments, and other living spaces can remain unoccupied for most months in the year. Meanwhile, America faces a dilemma of affordable housing options. As government officials grapple with potential solutions that will ensure people can afford a physical home, one study suggests implementing an empty-house tax can change the housing crisis status quo. Cities that have implemented such legislation have seen positive results in their economy and rates of unoccupied homes. “Housing prices are impacted by supply, and if there are thousands of homes that sit unused, even a fraction of that becoming available will have a real impact on prices,” Alex Tran, Housing Community Development Commissioner of San Jose told the San Jose Spotlight. “We are looking at these ...

Read More

Future Research, Programming Efforts Should Focus on Latino Families’ Strengths



Early childhood experiences impact early-stage development, lifelong health, and overall wellbeing. There is an urgent need to conduct research on the early home experiences of Latino children, according to a new report from the National Research Center on Hispanic Children and Families. Current research focuses more on families’ risk factors and deficits, rather than on protective factors and strengths. Moreover, much of the research that concentrates on early home environments to date has studied white, middle-class families. Little is known cultural norms, beliefs, values and expectations are embedded in Latino parenting and how Latino parenting practices promote development and cognitive and social competence. The National Research Center on Hispanic Children and ...

Read More

Dangerous ‘Forever Chemicals’ Contaminate Food Across the U.S


FDA PFAS Contamination Food

Hazardous firefighting substances are tainting a wide range of foods, exposing numerous Latinos and Americans to harmful materials that do not break down in the body over time. The FDA confirmed widespread per- and polyfluoroalkyl (PFAS) contamination this week. Their findings show high levels of the substance in meat, seafood, dairy, vegetable, and dessert products, according to the Environmental Working Group (EWG) “Measuring PFAS concentrations in food, estimating dietary exposure and determining the associated health effects is an emerging area of science,” the FDA writes in a statement. Additionally, FDA spokesperson Tara Rabin told the Associated Press that most contamination levels were “not likely to be a human health concern.” Investigation Findings and ...

Read More

Did That Last Fast Food Run Increase Your Risk of Cancer?



The way you eat can have a significant impact on your overall health. Food choices can even be the cause of developing invasive cancers, according to a new study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute Cancer Spectrum. Researchers found that individual diets could play a factor in 80,110 of the newly reported invasive cancer cases in 2015. That's 5.2% of the total number of cases among U.S. adults from that year. “Our findings underscore the opportunity to reduce the cancer burden and disparities in the United States by improving food intake,” said Dr. Fang Fang Zhang, one of the study's authors and a cancer, nutrition researcher at Tufts University. About the Study Researchers analyzed nationally-representative information to identify trends between ...

Read More

Minnesota Bans Dangerous PFAS in Many Consumer Goods, Elevates Firefighter Safety


Minnesota PFAS Ban

When alarmingly high levels of perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contaminated Bemidji, Minnesota’s (5.4% Latino) water, the city shut down two of its five wells. The city is planning to build a new $2 million well to ensure clean water. State lawmakers saw the harm PFAS, which are used as flame retardants, pose. So, the Minnesota (1.5% Latino) legislators passed a bill that bans those health-harming substances in many products used by consumers. Even worse, when those items catch fire, they release noxious fumes into the air, which harms firefighters throughout the country. “What we've learned over time is that those chemicals actually don't do much as far as fire protection,” Rep. Jamie Becker-Finn, one of the bill's authors, told Minnesota Public Radio ...

Read More