Over 2 Million U.S. Teens Use E-cigarettes, a Huge Public Health Concern


Latino teens e-cigs vaping smoking tobacco 21

Over 2 million U.S. teens say they use e-cigarettes, according to a new survey released by FDA and CDC. The study, which found that a quarter of these teens reported they vape daily, was based on data from the 2021 National Youth Tobacco Survey, a cross-sectional, self-administered survey of U.S. middle- and high-school students. "The use of tobacco products by youths in any form, including e-cigarettes, is unsafe. Most e-cigarettes contain nicotine, and nicotine exposure during adolescence can harm the developing brain," according to the FDA and CDC survey report, published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Key Report Findings on Youth E-cigarette Use In 2021, 11.3% of high-school (1.72 million) and 2.8% (320,000) of middle-school students reported current e-cigarette ...

Read More

Update: Coronavirus Case Rates and Death Rates for Latinos in the United States


latino boy hair cut face mask due to covid-19 coronavirus

The coronavirus COVID-19 can affect anyone. But reports show Latinos and other people of color are disproportionately affected, amid worsening historical inequities. What are the data really showing? UPDATE 10/13/21: New U.S., state, and city data! COVID-19 Case Rates for Latinos The U.S. population recently rose to 18.5% Latino. But coronavirus is disproportionately sickening Latinos. Latinos currently comprise 26.6% of COVID-19 cases in the United States, second only to Whites (51.8%), according to CDC data on health equity and cases on Oct. 12, 2021. Race/ethnicity data is available for 65% of the nation's cases. COVID-19-associated hospitalizations are also higher among Latinos. States are also experiencing Latino coronavirus case disparities: Utah is 14% ...

Read More

San Jose to Ban Smoking Inside Apartments, Selling of Flavored Tobacco Products


Ban Smoking Inside Flavored Tobacco Products

Lots of small cities in California have taken two big steps to protect youth from smoking addiction and secondhand smoke —banning flavored tobacco products and smoking inside all apartment homes. Now San Jose will become the state’s largest city to take both steps. The San Jose City Council is expected to formally approve the bans during a vote on Oct. 5, according to The Mercury News. “The tobacco industry has a stronghold on our kiddos — enticing them with flavors and leading them to a life of addiction,” Councilwoman Magdalena Carrasco, a champion of the proposed ban, said Monday. “Banana split, Kool-aid, Hawaiian punch, gummy bears — all of these e-cigarette flavors may taste like candy but it’s poison to our children.” San Jose’s New Ban on Smoking ...

Read More

Dr. Martha Bernal: The First Latina with a PhD in Psychology


Dr. Martha Bernal: The First Latina with a PhD in Psychology

To celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, we honor Dr. Martha Bernal, the first Latina to receive a PhD in psychology in the U.S. Bernal contributed greatly to the field of ethnic minority psychology and inspired many generations to follow her. “Dr. Martha Bernal demonstrated outstanding initiative and dedication to promoting the presence of ethnic minority psychologists in the profession. She provided guidance and inspiration to a wide range and large number of psychologists of color, men and women,” according to Society for the Psychology of Women. In addition to her contributions to the field, Bernal was a fierce advocate for justice and equity. “She was passionate about her ideas, she spoke out effectively against injustice, she maintained high standards of scholarship ...

Read More

Salud Talks Podcast Episode 38: “How to Empathetically Discuss the COVID-19 Vaccine”


Salud Talks 38

The COVID-19 vaccine is a contentious topic for many Latinos and Americans. The divide between those who are vaccinated and those who are unsure or don’t want to get the shot grows wider every day. But we can use compassion and cultural relevancy when promoting vaccine benefits with our loved ones who are unsure about the shot, according to two medical experts, Claudia Pineda, a physician assistant in Brooklyn, N.Y., and Dr. Katya Corado, a researcher with The Lundquist Institute. Listen to Claudia Pineda and Katy Corado in the newest Salud Talks Podcast, Episode 38, “How to Empathetically Discuss the COVID-19 Vaccine,” to learn how to have better conversations about COVID-19 vaccination! LISTEN! WHAT: A #SaludTalks Podcast discussion about the COVID-19 vaccine and ...

Read More

5 Key Moments in Modern History for Latinos


Key Moments Modern History

Latinos have played a major role in the development of the United States. This diverse demographic, today the nation’s largest racial/ethnic minority, has helped make the country the great melting pot it is. And despite an ongoing battle against discrimination and health disparities, Latino leaders continue to push their community to keep up hope and fight for what Cesar Chavez called La Causa, a term used to describe the struggle for equity. “In the end, the American dream is not a sprint, or even a marathon, but a relay,” said Julian Castro, former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. “Our families don’t always cross the finish line in the span of one generation. But each generation passes on to the next the fruits of their labor.” For Hispanic Heritage ...

Read More

Jim Morris: A Watchdog for Environmental Health


Jim Morris

Having been in the industry for over 40 years, Jim Morris is no newcomer to journalism. He’s worked at several news organizations across Texas and spent two decades at the Center for Public Integrity, a news nonprofit in Washington, D.C. In August 2021, he started Public Health Watch, a nonprofit investigative news organization that seeks to hold systems accountable and expose threats to the safety and wellbeing of the country. As the Executive Director and Editor-in-Chief of a virtual news organization, Morris faces some challenges. But in the end, it’s worth it to be able to help advocate for workers’ health and expose people to the human stories in public and environmental health. “I'm attracted to those kinds of stories. You can almost always tell a really ...

Read More

Latino Health Champions for Hispanic Heritage Month


Latino Health Champions Healthier Generation

In celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month, Alliance for a Healthier Generation is sharing a series of stories about Latino health champions. These champions—Bianca De León, Alejandro Diasgranados, Mario Reyna, and Pia Escudero—have different backgrounds and interests. But they share a passion for creating health equity and a more just, equitable, inclusive, and healthy future for children and families. Read their stories! Bianca De León: Community-Building to Connect Kids to Positive Experiences Bianca De León grew up speaking both English and Spanish with her single mother in their community along the U.S.-Mexico border. She had a loving network of cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents, and great grandparents. Now, as a mother, she continues to forge these ...

Read More

Ellen Ochoa: The First Latina Astronaut to Go into Space


Ellen Ochoa NASA Latino Astronaut

In 1993, Ellen Ochoa became the first Latino person in space. She logged nearly 1,000 hours in orbit across four space missions, studying the Earth's ozone layer. She would later become the NASA Johnson Space Center’s first Latina director and only its second female director. "At the time, it was really a personal thing," Ochoa told TODAY. "It was something I was very excited to participate in, and I loved working with the team and with my crew and doing work that was important to understanding changes in the atmosphere." "I realized the mission had repercussions well beyond that. I had the opportunity to talk to a lot of student groups, I was featured in children's books, textbooks – I'm just really grateful there was this whole extra dimension to that flight beyond the ...

Read More