Yvette Pavon: Living Life Better After Breast Cancer


Yvette Pavon breast cancer survivor 1

By Yvette Pavon San Antonio Cancer Survivor At the age of 42, I was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was found after my very first mammogram. Never did I think that a check up that I had scheduled only because it was something that women did when they got older, would discover I had cancer. I had no symptoms. When my gynecologist shared the news with me in her office, I think I was in complete denial. I mean I went for this mammogram on my own free will, not because of my doctor's concern. I remember going to dinner that night with my father, stepmother, and newly boyfriend. I wasn't scared when talking about it. I knew letting my mind run wild would not help, so I talked to God that night. "God, please give me the strength and courage that I need to get through ...

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Plastic in Breast Implants Linked to Cancer Development


Breast implant issues

Last month, the FDA and health experts met to review renewed safety concerns about long-term side effects─even cancer─caused by breast augmentation. Women across the U.S. have spoken up about health complications that they believe were caused by their breast implants. Health professionals, too, are concerned about the growing number of people affected. Latinas get implants more than any other minority group. Diana Zuckerman, president of the National Center for Health Research in Washington, D.C., analyzed past breast augmentation studies and spoke at the FDA’s conference on her findings. “Implants are not so innocent as presented,” Dr. Howard Amital, an Israeli rheumatologist who has studied this issue, told the New York Times. “There is a reason for concern. There ...

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Can Training Help Reduce Hidden Bias Against Latinos, Minorities?


implicit bias

We already know that implicit bias harms quality of life for Latinos and other minorities. Implicit bias is the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions unconsciously. This bias can affect relationships from the doctor's office to the workplace. The good news? Many companies and organizations are making an effort to create change with implicit bias training! But what exactly does this training entail? Does it work? What is Implicit Bias Training? Implicit bias training, also called unconscious bias training, is gaining popularity in business world. This training teaches employees to be aware of their ingrained biases as well as strategies for blunting the effects of those biases, reports The Washington Post. “I think this is the ...

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Latinos Face Discrimination When Up for Promotion, Even in the Military


Discrimination military

Latinos historically face discrimination in the hiring and promotion processes. A few years ago, a Harvard study found that one-third of Latinos say they were discriminated against when applying for jobs (33%) or when being paid equally or considered for promotions (32%). Now a recent report says discrimination extends to military promotions. Latinos Rarely Promoted to High Military Ranks Latinos have a “proud and indeed enviable” record of military service. Today, the Latino share of the active-duty force has continued to rise. In 2015, 12% of all active-duty personnel were Latino, up from 9% in 2004, according to Pew Research. But between 1995 and 2016, only one Latino had become a three-star general, even as the number of active-duty Latino officers more than doubled, ...

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Twin Cities Transformation: Moving Vehicles to Moving People


Bike lane in Minneapolis Source Michael Andersen with PlacesForBikes

During rush hour, the eight-lane Mississippi River Bridge in Minnesota collapsed, killing 13 people, and injuring over 140 more on Aug. 1, 2007. This tragedy was a wake-up call for officials in the Minneapolis-St. Paul “Twin Cities.” They could not afford to build their way out of congestion or repair the state’s deteriorating transportation infrastructure. To achieve safe transportation improvements for a growing population, the Twin Cities’  Metropolitan (Met) Council began to transition away from policies that move vehicles to ones that move people. The evolution began by rethinking how to measure road performance, according to a case study of the Met Council by the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT). Motivation to Change The bridge collapse highlighted ...

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Kids Face Risk of Lead-Contaminated Drinking Water in Schools



Children across the U.S. acquire and education through public school — they also receive lead exposure, according to new research. At least 22 states failed to protect students from water contamination, according to a study conducted by the Environment America Research & Policy Center and U.S. PIRG Education Fund. Worse, only two of the 32 tested states received a B rating. Not one state made an A. Schools in states with large Latino populations also fared poorly. “It's concerning,” Julie Ma, a mother in Boston (19.4% Latino) who prepares water bottles for her kids every day, told CBS. “I really would like to get the lead out of the water supply as fast as possible for the students ... Many schools don't even know if they have it and haven't been able to make those ...

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You May Be Biased and Not Know It (and Here’s How to Check)


implicit bias tests for skin tones of faces

Implicit bias, also known as unconscious bias, occurs when stereotypes influence automatic brain processing. We can be susceptible to inherent bias and not even know it. Fortunately, you can find out if you have such leanings. Implicit Bias Testing Harvard’s Project Implicit developed The Implicit Association Test (IAT). The test, created 20 years ago, measures social attitudes and beliefs that people may be unwilling or unable to realize. The various implicit bias assessments focus on gender, race, skin color, weight, and more. There is no Hispanic/Latino-focused test, though. Bias tests can expose one's implicit attitudes, of which they are unaware. For example, you may believe women and men should be equally associated with careers in scientific fields. Yet, your ...

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Tell EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler: Keep Our Waters Clean!


EPA clean water act

The EPA recently proposed a revision of its Waters of the United States rule that intends to roll back clean water initiatives. The change─the so-called Trump “Dirty Water Rule”─could reduce the number of rivers and lakes regulated under the Clean Water Act. It would also result in 18% of streams and 51% of wetlands to no longer fall under the EPA’s protection, leaving millions of Americans vulnerable to polluted water, according to The U.S. Geological Survey. Water poverty, or a lack of a toilet, tub, shower, or running water, affects nearly 1.6 million Americans, according to U.S. census data. Latinos already face chemical exposure in water at home and on military bases. EPA wants your public comment on its proposed clean water rollback! Email EPA Chief Andrew ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 4/9: Harmful Chemicals in Consumer Products


Children furniture safety

Did you know many everyday products in your house contain harmful chemicals? Companies such as Johnson & Johnson, Claire’s, and Monsanto are all currently facing backlash over chemicals in their baby, cosmetic, and gardening products — which have reportedly caused severe health issues, such as cancer. Many people are urging stricter chemical regulation. But as government officials and companies grapple with product regulation, these chemicals cause intolerance and other health side effects that drastically impact the lives of consumers and commercial laborers. These health inequities can affect Latinos, who work with these products more frequently than other demographics. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, April 9, 2019, to share relevant information about how to ...

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