Can Immigrant Tenant Protection Laws Help Latinos?


landlord tenant immigrant protection apartment renter latio couple

Illinois has joined California as the second U.S. state to enact immigrant tenant protection law. State Gov. J.B. Pritzker recently signed a new law to prevent landlords from disclosing or threatening to disclose a tenant’s citizenship status to authorities for the purpose of intimidating or eviction. The law prevents landlords from, in essence, blackmailing tenants. Ilinois modeled its law after California, which passed its tenant protections in 2018. “Where you were born has absolutely nothing to do with your ability to pay rent on time, which is what the relationship between a landlord and a tenant should really be about,” Pritzker said, according to the Chicago Trubine. Inside the New Immigrant Tenant Protection Act? Illinois' new immigrant tenant protection act ...

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Advocates: ‘Tragic’ New Rule Will Hurt Latina Reproductive Health


Latina reproductive health title X

Organizations who offer reproductive services in areas with limited options for low-income Latinas and other women of color are dealing with a new Trump administration rule that can limit clinics' access to federal funding, making it harder to offer affordable care to women, NBC News reports. The "gag rule," named because advocates say it hinders a doctor's ability to provide the care they think is best, went into effect August 2019. The rule states that family planning services that get Title X federal funding must also be financially detached from any abortion services. Abortion and Title X services also must take place in separate facilities. However, federal law already forbids taxpayer funds to be used for abortions, excluding cases of rape, incest, or to save the woman's ...

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Jennifer Thomas: ‘Breast Cancer Can’t Steal our Ability to Sparkle Radiantly’


Jennifer Thomas breast cancer survivor san antonio

By Jennifer Thomas San Antonio, Texas, Cancer Survivor I had just turned 39 when I reached over my shoulder to turn off a lamp, and in so doing, felt a funny “spot” on my breast. Having no history of cancer in my family, I can’t say that was my first thought. But since it WAS October—Breast Cancer Awareness Month—I did call my husband into the living room to see if he felt it as well. This was late January of 2006. Despite being told by everyone the spot was “probably nothing,” I got it checked out and was diagnosed with Stage 1 IDC, fast-growing (grade 3) by the first week of February. I don’t remember getting a second opinion, doing any research, or even asking what my options were. I just know that a week after being diagnosed, I was in surgery ...

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Latino Undercount in 2020 Census Could Cost States Billions in Family Assistance


Latino undercount in 2020 Census

An undercount of Latinos in the 2020 Census could cost 37 states hundreds of millions in federal funding. For example, a Latino undercount could cost Texas up to $14 billion of federal money for housing, child and foster care, and other family aid programs, according to a new brief from Child Trends. “The impact of any Census undercount will be felt in state budgets and communities throughout the country,” according to the Child Trends report. “At stake is federal funding for programs that help states improve the well-being of their residents, and their children especially.” Why Is a Latino Undercount Expected? Historically, the Census has undercounted Latinos. For the 2020 Census, even without a citizenship question, officials expect a 3% or more undercount of Latinos, ...

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Salud Talks Podcast Episode One: “On Fire”


Salud Talks Episode 1 On fire

In its first episode, the Salud Talks podcast covers one of the critical issues of our time: the Climate Crisis. We sat down with experts in this field to discuss the history behind climate change, how we got where we are today, and what has to be done to save the planet. The episode went live on Sept. 4, 2019, at 6 a.m. WHAT: A discussion on the climate crisis and how it is and will continue to impact Latinos and all Americans GUESTS: Dolores "DeeDee" Belmares, the Texas Field Consultant for Moms Clean Air Force, and Dr. Juan Declet-Barreto, a climate scientist with the Union of Concerned Scientists WHERE: Available wherever fine podcasts are downloaded, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, SoundCloud, Tune In, and others. WHEN: Live Wed., Sept. 4, 2019, at 6 ...

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#SaludTues 9/10/19: Promoting a Healthy Weight For All Kids!


Children Running Obesity Prevention

All kids deserve to live in conditions that are safe a conducive to good health, yet many Latino children live in communities with poor access to healthy food and green space, attend schools that lack opportunities for physical activity, and suffer from adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), which may put them at risk for a number of health conditions, including having an unhealthy weight. Currently, at least 1 in 5 U.S. children are classified as obese. Among Latino and African American rates of children at an unhealthy weight are even higher. September is national childhood obesity prevention month, let's chat solutions and work to create a healthier future for our children. WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: "Promoting a Healthy Weight For All Kids" TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 ...

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Migrant Kids Suffer Stress, Trauma in Long Stays at Detention Centers


migrant children detained mental health trauma immigrant

Mental health experts are worried as the Trump administration pursues new policy that would allow it to indefinitely detain migrant families who have crossed the U.S. border illegally, rather than a maximum of 20 days NPR reports. Detainment is damaging children's mental health, they say. "If the regulation goes through and we hope it will not ... we're going to see additional harm done to children," Luis Zayas, a clinical social worker and psychologist at the University of Texas at Austin, told NPR. Long Detainment Stays = Trauma Detained immigrant children and families already face big stress, according to a recent study. Researchers interviewed 425 mothers of children at the detention center. The mothers filled out a questionnaire about mental health symptoms in their ...

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Did Obamacare Reduce Gaps in Latino Health Insurance Coverage?



When the Obama administration passed the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010, one of its main goals was to expand healthcare insurance access, especially to uninsured, mid- to low-income Americans — a classification in which many Latinos find themselves. Since that time, the ACA provided millions of Americans with health insurance coverage, primarily through an expansion of Medicaid eligibility and subsidies for private coverage purchased through the legislation’s marketplaces. The ACA has expanded and improved coverage options for people without access to a job-based health plan, the law mostly left the employer market alone. "All racial groups have experienced substantial increases in their health insurance coverage," Algernon Austin, with the Center for Global Policy Solutions ...

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Texas Increased the Number of School Marshals by 325% in Last Year


Texas School Safety

Texas is one of five states that allows non-security school employees to carry firearms in schools—with permission and training. With 80 hours of training, these armed school employees are known as school marshals. In the past year, the number of school marshals in Texas increased by 325%, according to a new school safety state report released by Governor Greg Abbott. It provides an update on the state’s progress on recommendations made in the School Safety Action Plan, released in May 2018. Improving School Safety? Since the publication of the action plan, Texas passed 20 bills and appropriated $339 million to improve school safety. There is some disagreement as to which recommendations, and subsequent legislation, will be the most effective. For example, two 2018 ...

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