SF to Consider Universal Childcare for Residents



$11,000 is a lot of money. You can get a pretty decent car. You can buy a year's worth of groceries to feed a family of four. You could even get 11 of the new iPhone X. Or you can pay a year of childcare for one child. With the average cost of center-based daycare at $11,666 a year, many low-income Latino families struggle to afford childcare. Or it comes at the expense of healthy food or preventive medical care. That's why city leaders in San Francisco (15.3% Latino) are exploring how to provide affordable universal childcare to residents to ease parents' financial burdens. District 6 City Supervisor Jane Kim plans to introduce the measure on the November 2018 ballot. “If we truly believe that families are the backbone of our city, then we all have to do what we can to ...

Read More

Salud America! Website, Videos Get a Big Shout-Out



We at Salud America! are dedicated to helping people drive healthy community change for Latino and all kids. That’s why we’re excited to announce that our newly revamped Salud America! website has already won two W³ digital content awards and one Davey Awards from the national Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts: 2017 W³ Awards, Silver, Activism for Websites, Salud America! website 2017 W³ Awards, Silver, Aesthetics for Websites, Salud America! website 2017 Davey Awards, Silver, Film/Video-Health & Wellness for Non-Broadcast, Salud America! Video: Bebidas Azucaradas  “We’re excited by the recognition of our communication work from groups like the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts,” said Dr. Amelie Ramirez, director of Salud America! at UT ...

Read More

Do Latinos Live in America’s Most Livable Cities?



Where you live has an impact on almost every aspect of your life. While the U.S. is a rich, diverse country that has attracted people to its cities for centuries, not all of these cities are equal. Some are simply more livable than others. For many Latinos, especially those from low-income families, they often have to live in areas that are high in poverty and crime and often lack access to safe physical activity spaces and healthy food options. America's Most Livable Cities + Latinos In an effort to determine the “best” of these cities, the financial web site 24/7 Wall St. has created an index of the 50 best cities for Americans to live in. What makes a city livable? Some of the factors considered by 24/7 Wall St. include crime rate, economy, and overall ...

Read More

David’s Law and What it Means for Latinos


cyberbullying victim being video recorded on a smartphone by classmates in the street with a unfocused background

"David's Law" is now in effect to criminalize and prevent cyberbullying in and out of Texas schools. The law is named after David Molak, a 16-year-old San Antonio high school student who took his own life after months of relentless cyberbullying and physical threats. And David isn't the only one. Almost half the U.S. student population experiences some type of bullying. “David’s law will focus on prevention efforts in schools while offering consequences to those who wish to exploit and harass our children on the Internet," said Texas State Sen. Jose Menéndez, who filed Senate Bill 179 for David's Law. Cyberbullying Impacts Latino Youth Cyberbullying is a form of bullying. It doesn't happen in the halls or the classroom. It happens online, through social media, ...

Read More

Pediatricians Prescribe Books to Boost Literacy in Latino Families



Pediatricians play a big role in a child's health. But not in the way you might think. Treating flu and other illnesses is only 10% of what makes a person healthy. The rest is genetics (20%), environment (20%), and daily behaviors (50%). That's why it's so important for pediatricians to engage parents and kids to improve daily behaviors—like reading to young children and playing outside—especially among Latinos who have limited safe places to play and early educational gaps. Two amazing reading programs are doing just that. Reach Out and Read Latinos often enter kindergarten developmentally behind their non-Latino peers, Salud America! research shows. For example, as early as age four, children in low-income families hear 30 million fewer words than than their middle and ...

Read More

Murals With a Message Bring Hope in Mental Health Campaign



"You Matter." "You are Brave." "You are Enough." These three phrases are the highlights of a big, bright, colorful mural completed earlier in October by Denver artists Pat Milbery and Jason Graves to help drive mental health awareness and bust stigma. The mural is part of Kaiser Permanente's “Find Your Words” campaign. The campaign encourages people suffering from depression or who know someone dealing with it to find the courage to talk. The campaign is led by Kaiser alongside the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, Crisis Text Line and Mental Health America. The campaign launched in four states with social media and a resource website with an interactive forum on mental health issues. The Reason for the ...

Read More

One Region’s Big Effort to Connect Rural Residents to Healthy Food



Salud America! Guest Blogger Ethan Goffman of Mobility Lab In rural areas, a car is a lifeline to groceries, community, and medical care—all the basics of life. Seniors who can no longer drive, Latinos who often live without easy access to grocery stores or farmer's markets, and other people without access to a car, must depend on neighbors and whatever public transit may be available. Enter Rabbit Transit, which is striving to connect otherwise isolated individuals. The agency serves York County (7.2% Latino) and nine other rural counties in Central Pennsylvania, providing some 2.5 million trips a year, explained Richard Farr, the agency’s executive director. “Part of our mission statement is really focusing on a high quality of life for our residents,” Farr said. ...

Read More

Poll: More than 3 in 4 Latinos Say Latinos Face Discrimination


Latin family sitting in the street

Three in four U.S. Latinos (78%) believe Latinos face discrimination in America today, compared to 92% of blacks and 55% of whites who say they face discrimination, according to a new poll. Who is doing the discriminating? Nearly half of Latinos (47%) believe personal prejudice is the bigger problem. A smaller amount (37%) say say discrimination based in laws and government policies is the bigger problem. About 14% say they're equally problematic. The data is from a new poll by National Public Radio (NPR), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. "Basically what we have found is that discrimination is a type of stressful life experience that has negative effects on health similar to other kinds of stressful experiences," ...

Read More

5 Big Things to Know for Open Enrollment 2018


obamacar ACA health coverage insurance enrollment

Open enrollment for health insurance kicks off today! Millions of people have used the Insurance Marketplace to enroll for healthcare coverage. In fact, the amount of Latinos with no coverage dropped from 26.2% to 15.1% under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) from 2013 to 2016. But it's still much higher than the drop among uninsured whites from 14.1% to 6.6% in that same span, according to a Salud America! research review. How can more people get covered? 5 Things to Know for Open Enrollment 2018 Here are some important things to know for those seeking healthcare coverage: Open Enrollment for 2018 runs from November 1 through December 15, 2017. Coverage begins Jan. 1, 2018, if you buy coverage during this time. You can apply for coverage four ways: online, phone, ...

Read More