Latinos Breathe More Unclean Air Because of White Consumption


unclean air pollution

It is a proven fact that people of color inhale more hazardous pollution than whites. Worse, the consumption of products that cause unclean air is coming from the community least affected by this kind of pollution — whites, according to recent research. Latinos, the group most impacted, will breathe 63% more contaminated air than what their consumption produces. “Even though minorities are contributing less to the overall problem of air pollution, they are affected by it more,” Jason Hill,  study co-author, University of Minnesota engineering professor, and who is also white, told USA Today. “Is it fair [that] I create more pollution, and somebody else is disproportionately affected by it?” Air quality detrimentally affects Latinos in childhood diabetes, lung ...

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#BigGive2019 Brings San Antonio Nonprofits Together!


SABigGive2

On Thursday, March 28, 2019, for the first time ever, Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio will join dozens of nonprofits in raising funds for the health and well being of kids and families in our community! This is the first time in Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio's 12-year history that we're partnering with local nonprofits for the #BigGive2019. What's the #BigGive 2019? The the #BigGive2019 is a 1-day online event expected to bring out thousands of partners in support of local initiatives that have a direct impact on people in San Antonio, Bexar County, and surrounding communities. Why We're Excited to Join the #BigGive2019 This is our chance for us to showcase the healthy changes happening in San Antonio. Here are just a few examples of Salud America! Salud ...

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5 Pediatrician-Approved Policies to Limit Kids’ Sugary Drinks (Including Soda Taxes)


Latino toddler kid with sugury drink obesity

In a joint policy statement today, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Heart Association (AHA) endorsed five public health measures—including excise taxes—to reduce kids’ consumption of sugary drinks. The statement appears in the April 2019 issue of Pediatrics. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that children and teens consume fewer than 10% of calories from added sugars. But data show that they now consume 17% of their calories from added sugars—half of which come from sports drinks, fruit-flavored drinks and sodas. Latino children consume more sugary drinks than their peers. "On average, children are consuming over 30 gallons of sugary drinks every year. This is enough to fill a bathtub, and it doesn’t even include added sugars ...

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4 Heroes Who Are Revolutionizing Trauma-Informed Care in Schools


4 heroes of trauma informed care and ACEs

Childhood trauma. Adverse childhood experiences. Mental health issues. Whatever you call it, trauma impacts a child’s brain and body. It undermines a child’s ability to learn, build relationships, and contribute in the classroom. Schools can play a big role in supporting students who deal with trauma out of school. That's why we at Salud America! are spotlighting four Salud Heroes who are creating school environments to address childhood trauma among students! 1. Ex-Coach Helps School District Change its System to Create a Culture of Care for Students of Trauma John Hernandez coached football in three disadvantaged school districts in Texas. When a player missed practice, Hernandez took it on himself to visit their home. He would check in on them and offer rides, so the ...

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Racial Bias Still Infects the Doctor’s Office


doctor bias

In medical school, physicians are trained to exclude their own personal upbringings, and that of their patients, from clinical decisions. That doesn't always happen in reality. In fact, doctors are often susceptible to their unconscious bias, research shows. Unconscious bias, also known as "implicit bias," happens when automatic processing is influenced by stereotypes. These stereotypes then impact your actions and judgments. Doctors & Implicit Bias Many studies have shown that physicians—especially white physicians—have implicit preferences for white patients. Implicit bias can lead to false assumptions and adverse health outcomes. For example: Implicit bias is a major reason why Latino men are much less likely to receive optimal treatment for high-risk ...

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As Trump Vows to End to HIV, Epidemic Continues Huge Rise among Latinos


latino hispanic young man adult writing

Just weeks after President Donald Trump unveiled a plan to end the HIV epidemic by 2030, a CDC report showed a rising trend in HIV cases among Latinos. Overall, the U.S. HIV rate declined by 6% from 2010-2016, according to the CDC. But the Latino HIV rate rose 14% over the same span. The disparity is even more stark among Latino gay and bisexual men, who suffered a 30% rise in HIV cases. The rate actually fell 16% among white gay and bisexual men. "This CDC report shows an alarming trend that is urgent to address," said Guillermo Chacon, of the Latino Commission on AIDS, in an email. "The messenger matters and in this case customized prevention strategies by population matters even more. It is critical to re-set and review the prevention and engagement efforts to reverse this ...

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4 Communities Leading the Way for Walking, Public Transit


Women loading bike onto rack on bus Source Omnitrans

Transit-rich, walkable communities strengthen the local economy, create opportunities for Latino and other vulnerable residents, and enhance community resilience. That’s why America Walks, a nonprofit organization, released four case studies sharing collaborative efforts to improve safety, walkability, and access to transit in four communities across the country. This is another effort in their Transit-Walkability Collaborative, which was established in 2017 by America Walks and eight other organizations. As part of the case study series, America Walks recognized: Nashville, Tennessee (10.4% Latino); Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania (17.3%); Hartford, Connecticut (44.3%); and San Bernardino, California (64.3%). Two counties in particular offer valuable insights into inspiring ...

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Tell EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler: Protect Our Families from Mercury Pollution!


Mercury air pollution rule

The EPA is proposing new rules that would roll back regulations for mercury air pollution, which disproportionately endangers the Latino community. Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), established in 2012, aimed to drastically decrease toxins produced by coal-burning power plants from polluting the atmosphere. These protections have reportedly resulted in averting heart attacks, asthma complications, and premature deaths by the thousands. Experts say the proposed rollback by EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler could boost levels of mercury, soot, and other hazardous pollution in our air, water, food, and communities. Fortunately, you can speak up! Send This Email Now to EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler! Dear EPA Chief Wheeler, I support current Mercury and Air Toxics Standards, which aim ...

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Latinos are More Likely to Face Police Discrimination While Driving



Latinos and other minorities are frequently subject to negative stereotypes. In fact, 78% of Latinos in the United States said they face discrimination. That number is even worse for blacks at 92%. A new Stanford Univerity study shows the problem bleeds into the treatment minorities receive from law enforcement. The Open Policing Project (OPP) found that police stopped and searched black and Latino drivers with less basis of evidence than used in stopping white drivers, who are searched less often but are more likely to be found with illegal items. "Because of this analysis, we're able to get to that anecdotal story to say this is really happening," Sharad Goel, an assistant professor in management science and engineering at Stanford and a co-author of the study, told NBC ...

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