How to Dismantle 5 Ugly Drivers of Health Inequity



Health equity is when everyone has a fair and just opportunity to live their healthiest life possible. Yet health inequity remains. Latinos, for example, face discriminatory policies and barriers to healthcare, social support, healthy food, and more. That's why we're proud to share A Blueprint for Changemakers: Achieving Health Equity Through Law & Policy, a new report from ChangeLab Solutions and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation that can help communities advance a local agenda to ensure health equity for everyone. The Blueprint report offers key policies and legal strategies on five underlying realities behind health inequity: 1. Reduce Structural Discrimination Historic oppression, segregation, and bias create health inequity. Among Latinos, implicit bias impacts ...

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47 States Don’t Meet the Recommended Student-to-Counselor Ratio


Police in public schools.

Schools today are under-resourced, and students are overcriminalized, particularly children of color and those with disabilities, according to a new report from the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). For the first time, the U.S. Department of Education now requires every public school to report the number of social workers, nurses, and psychologists employed. The ACLU analysis of the federal data provides a state-level, student-to-staff ratio for each position as well as a review of law enforcement presence in schools, student arrests, and referrals. The real crisis of schools isn’t violence, but a widespread failure to hire enough support staff that can meet students’ mental health needs, according to the report. The study uses data from the 2015-16 academic year, ...

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What is Implicit Bias and Why Should You Care?



Most people think they have no bias toward other people. But we all have preconceived notions or stereotypes that—beyond our control—affect our understanding, actions, and decisions about others. This is what experts call "implicit bias." Implicit bias can be good or bad. Either way, preference has enormous implications for the health of Latinos and all communities in our society. What Is Implicit Bias? Implicit bias is defined as the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions unconsciously, according to the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Ohio State University. This kind of bias happens when stereotypes influence your brain processing. Studies show that your mind decides up to 10 seconds before you realize ...

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6 Emerging Ways Cities Can Solve the Affordable Housing Crisis


What-is-affordable-housing-infographic

Demand for affordable housing is high, but supply is down in many U.S. cities. More than 11 million renters and 8 million homeowners spend more than half their income on housing; this results in extreme cost burdens and jeopardizes individual health, according to the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University. “A lack of federal action and cash-strapped state and local budgets have contributed to the affordable housing crisis,” writes Teresa Wiltz for Pew Trusts. “Citizens are showing up at town halls and city council meetings demanding action.” Cities must find a way to boost affordable housing, but how can they make a difference? Here are six solutions to help improve affordable housing: 1. Create Affordable Housing Trusts. Housing trust funds are ...

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Stories Spurring on Systemic Shifts: Salud America!’s 10-Year, Steadfast Strive


BigGive3

Latinos on the U.S.-Mexico border struggle with debilitating illnesses for years, but often lack proper healthcare because of socioeconomic, accessibility, or other inequalities. Dr. Amelie Ramirez grew up seeing these disparities in South Texas. She was driving to pursue a public health education and tirelessly toil to establish projects that assist the underprivileged. Perhaps Ramirez’s most innovative project, Salud America! has worked since 2007 to create a wide-reaching library of resources and actions, which greatly impact the personal and public health mindset of advocates, schools, and policymakers. Salud America! content is vital to advance the well-being of Latinos, Ramirez said. “The health inequities Latinos face was then, and continues to be, something to ...

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Why 2 Latino Cities Rank as the Least Healthy in U.S.



Two Texas cities—Laredo (95.4% Latino) and Brownsville (93.9% Latino)—rank as the least healthy U.S. cities, according to the 2019 Healthiest & Unhealthiest Cities in America by WalletHub. The ranking scores 174 large cities based on 42 health indicators. They look at cost of medical visits, and the number of dieticians and mental health counselors. They also factor in the amount of green space, trails, and healthy restaurants. Healthy food consumption and physical activity also has weight. "Some places promote wellness by expanding access to nutritious food and recreational facilities. Others strive to keep healthcare costs affordable for everyone or keep parks clean and well-maintained," according to WalletHub. "When a city doesn’t take care of these issues, it can ...

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Dust: The Tiny Cause of Big Weight Gain in Kids?


dust fat cells

Dust buildup in the home can lead to allergy issues and asthma attacks — now researchers are saying it can also lead to weight gain in children. A new study links over 100 chemicals found in dust to fat cell generation and development, or endocrine disrupters. This kind of linkage is uncharted territory, said Christopher Kassotis, research team lead and post-doctoral research associate at Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment, in a news release. "This is some of the first research investigating links between exposure to chemical mixtures present in the indoor environment and metabolic health of children living in those homes," Kassotis said. Latinos, who face chemical exposure at work and in the air they breathe, can also be subject to these adverse substances ...

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The Sad Reason More Latino Kids Don’t Participate in School Sports, Activities



Nearly 21% of Latino parents said their middle- and high-school children would not participate in any school activities in 2018-19, a higher rate than parents overall (18%), according to the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health at the University of Michigan. These kids miss the boost in educational achievement and personal development that stem from school extracurricular activities, from sports to student council. So why aren't more kids participating? The Biggest Reason: Cost Most middle- and high-schoolers will participate in at least one school activity in 2018-19. This includes 52% in sports, 43% in arts, and 51% in clubs/other, according to the poll. But cost is the biggest reason keeping other kids from participating. Many school ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 4/2: How Child Toxic Stress is Bad for Health


Without responsive relationships with caring adults, children experiencing trauma may face developmental delays and health problems later in life.

Child toxic stress is bad for health. Strong, frequent, or prolonged toxic stress response in childhood can disrupt the development of brain architecture and other organ systems. Without responsive relationships with caring adults, children these children face developmental delays and health problems later in life. But many don’t understand of how childhood trauma impacts kids’ brains, bodies, and behavior. Let’s use #SaludTues on April 2, 2019, to tweet about toxic stress problems and solutions to celebrate National Stress Awareness Month in April. WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “How Child Toxic Stress is Bad for Health” TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST Tuesday, April 2, 2019 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: Turnaround ...

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