This Latina Wants Leaders to Prioritize Childcare When Reopening after Lockdown



Without childcare, going back to work after the coronavirus lockdown is not an option for many families. But many city and state leaders are overlooking this childcare dilemma as they push to reopen businesses, even while schools remain closed amid the pandemic. That’s why Melinda Lopez is speaking up. Rhode Island, where Lopez lives, began reopening businesses on May 9. But childcare sites have to remain closed through May 30. Beyond this three-week-lag, when childcare centers do reopen, they will take fewer kids. Many moms will still be left without a spot for their child. “I’m concerned about what our women in our communities are going to do,” said Lopez, an Education Strategies Specialist with Highlander Institute, Early Childhood Adjunct Instructor at Rhode ...

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Coronavirus Complicates Homelessness, Which Could Rise 45%


homeless coronavirus mask wearing street homelessness

The COVID-19 pandemic is having a devastating impact on homelessness. People who experience homelessness are transient. That makes it harder to detect, track, and prevent disease transmission, and treat those who need care. Now some experts say rising unemployment could spark a 45% rise in homelessness by the end of 2020, leaving 800,000 people with no permanent shelter in the U.S., the L.A. Times reports. "If the projections of unemployment being made now turn out to be accurate, and the relationship between unemployment and homelessness follows the historical pattern, and no other major changes occur, that’s what we can expect to happen," said economist Dr. Brendan O’Flaherty of Columbia University. Concerns for the Homeless amid Coronavirus People experiencing ...

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Eric Cooper: How San Antonio Food Bank Feeds People Amid Coronavirus


Eric Cooper directs the San Antonio Food Bank to Help Feed Families amid Coronavirus

Eric Cooper knows what it's like to depend on public assistance programs. He grew up in a low-income family, relying on free school meals and food assistance to get enough food to eat. Today, as CEO of the San Antonio Food Bank, Cooper helps families like his. And with rising amounts of food insecurity amid the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, he led the Food Bank to orchestrate a whole new way of operating. An army of volunteers has stepped up to meet the needs of so many, by working in back-to-back shifts and implementing new strategies, such as drive-through pickup lines or COVID-19 preparation kits. Their efforts have garnered national acclaim and have turned a crisis into a rallying point for those who need it most. "I think all of us, as human beings find ourselves in ...

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Salud Talks Podcast Episode 30: “Hereditary Sickness”


Hereditary Sickness webpic

Last week, we discussed how high levels of stress can influence the development of cancer. This week, we explore another risk factor in cancer development — genetics. A person’s family or place of origin, even dating back years and years, can influence that individual’s risk for certain types of cancers. Dr. Laura Fejerman, an Associate Professor at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, joins Salud Talks to discuss her research into the discovery of genetic and non-genetic factors that contribute to breast cancer risk and prognosis in Latinas. Check out this discussion on the Salud Talks Podcast, Episode 30, "Hereditary Sickness"!  WHAT: A #SaludTalks discussion about genetics and their impact on cancer GUEST: Dr. Laura Fejerman, an ...

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7 Reasons to Push for Paid Sick Leave Policies for During and Post-Pandemic


paid sick leave for workers

Without paid sick leave, too many Latinos are forced to choose between financial security and health. After all, just a few days of lost pay due to illness is the same as losing an entire month’s worth of groceries for some families, which fare worse during a pandemic like COVID-19. “For a typical Latino family without paid sick days, losing an average of 3.3 days due to sickness is equivalent to a family’s entire monthly health care budget or its monthly grocery budget,” according to a joint fact sheet from UnidosUS and National Partnership for Women & Families. This situation won’t just fix itself after the pandemic, either. “Lives are at stake when policies are not put in place from the top down to prevent the spread of disease or create healthy living ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 5/19: Why Paid Sick Leave Policies Are So Important


Paid sick leave

Half of workers with the lowest wages and more than half of Latinos are unable to earn a single paid sick day through their jobs. Without paid sick leave, these workers are forced to choose between the financial consequences of staying home without pay and the health risks of both ignoring health problems and exposing others to contagious disease. Afterall, just a few days of lost pay due to illness is the same as losing an entire month’s grocery budget for some families. Workers everywhere should be able to earn paid sick leave, particularly as our country focuses on economic recovery after COVID-19. Join #SaludTues on May 19, 2020, at 1:00 PM EST to tweet about why it is so important to for all workers to be able to earn paid sick leave. WHAT: #SaludTuesTweetchat: ...

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Salud America! Talks Latino Health Equity Amid COVID-19 with APHA


amelie ramirez rosalie aguilar talk latino health equity amid coronavirus on apha podcast

Dr. Amelie Ramirez, Director of Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio, and Rosalie Aguilar, National Project Coordinator, discussed some of the challenges U.S. Latinos face amid the COVID-19 pandemic, on a recent episode of The Nation's Health, The American Public Health Association (APHA) podcast. On the podcast, Ramirez and Aguilar talked about: How COVID-19 impacts U.S. Latinos differently The important role language plays during a pandemic like COVID-19 Promoting health equity during the pandemic What public health practitioners can do to close the gap and lessen the harmful impact on Latino communities Latinos already face a number of health disparities due to underlying inequities in poverty, access to quality and affordable housing, jobs, and ...

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Dad, Daughter Create ‘La Loteria’ Bingo to Help Families Stay Healthy amid COVID-19


La Loteria bingo game cards for coronavirus covid-19

Use La Loteria to talk about health with your family amid COVID-19! La Loteria, a traditional game in Latino families, is a version of Bingo using pictures on cards instead of numbers. The National Alliance for Hispanic Health has created COVID-19 Bingo (La Loteria). The family game has pictures of social distancing, hand-washing, video calls, physical activity, healthy food, faith, hope, and more. "My daughter and I were playing La Loteria and we thought it might be a great way to help other kids understand COVID-19," said Edgar Gil Rico of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health. "So it became a family project resulting in a new version of Bingo (La Loteria) with tips for parents to use the game to discuss COVID-19 and what families can do to stay well and healthy." La ...

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Julie Moser: What Happens When a Military Spouse Gets Breast Cancer?


Julie Moser breast cancer survivor BFFs - collage

By Julie Moser Military Spouse, Breast Cancer Advocate Founder, Executive Director, PWATX October 28, 2013, is a date that will always be one that will be remembered without thinking about it. You know, like a birth date or wedding anniversary. October 28, 2013, is the day I became a survivor. When the doctor said the words: “You have cancer." On the early morning of my husband’s third deployment send-off, I noticed a brown line under my left breast after a shower. It looked like I had burned my skin with a curling iron. My husband said that it probably wasn’t a big deal as long as I didn’t feel any lumps. I didn’t tell him I felt something but told him that I would get it checked out later in the day with my primary care physician. My doctor found three ...

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