FDA Approves New Drug for Alzheimer’s, But Scientists Divided Over Decision


FDA Approves New Drug for Alzheimer’s, But Scientists Divided Over Decision

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new drug called Aduhelm (aducanumab) to treat Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. Many are applauding the drug and are encouraged by the scientific progress in a field that has long had limited treatment options. Alzheimer’s affects over 6.2 million people in the U.S., with Latinos being 1.5 times more likely to develop it than white people. “What's really exciting is that aducanumab is the first new FDA-approved Alzheimer's treatment in nearly 20 years, and we're optimistic this will spark a wave of new research and innovation in this space. Patients are excited for that, too, and if aducanumab is the first step toward that brighter future, patients are eager to be part of it,” said Dr. Rany Aburashed, ...

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New $9.8 Million Study is 1st to Seek Full Understanding of the Latino Cancer Survivorship Journey


New $9.8 Million Study is 1st to Seek Full Understanding of the Latino Cancer Survivorship Journey

Latinos with cancer face a tough survivorship journey. Many suffer advanced disease, poor quality of life, and stressful social and economic inequities. This is why a new, first-of-its-kind national cohort study will unpack the social, cultural, behavioral, psychosocial, biological, and medical influences on post-cancer life in Latino cancer survivors to fill a crucial gap in knowledge about their survivorship experience. The study, “Avanzando Caminos (Leading Pathways): The Hispanic/Latino Cancer Survivorship Study,” is funded by a 6-year, $9.8-million grant from the National Cancer Institute that will team up two of its Cancer Centers, the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson and the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of ...

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Daniel Carlos Hughes: From Quitting Dow Chemical to Studying Holistic Health, Cancer Prevention


Dr.-Daniel-Carlos-Hughes-of-UT-Health-San-Antonio

Daniel Carlos Hughes thought he wanted to be a chemical engineer. He worked at Dow Chemical for 23 years, moving up to a middle management position. But then he had a midlife crisis. Now he works as a kinesiologist focuses on sport and exercise psychology. He researches holistic interventions for cancer prevention and with an emphasis on exercise and stress in Latina breast cancer survivors as a faculty member of the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at UT Health San Antonio. While the career switch was risky and required many years of schooling, Hughes is glad to have found a calling where he can help cancer survivors live longer, fitter, better lives. Hughes, a First Generation Mexican American in His Second Career Hughes was born in Mexico City. His family ...

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Facebook Live En Español: The Latino Cancer Survivor’s Journey


Latina Latino Cancer Survivor breast cancer strong

Cancer affects different people differently. For Latinos, the cancer survivorship journey is shaped by cultural and spiritual beliefs. Latinos also face struggles with barriers to care, screening, clinical trial participation, and patient-doctor communication. This is the focus of a new Spanish-language Facebook Live event, “Supervivencia: Viviendo a través y más allá del cáncer," set for 6-7:30 p.m. CST Monday, May 19, 2021. The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS) South Texas Chapter is sponsoring the event. Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio will host the event on its Facebook page. Register here for the Facebook Live event. The event will feature: Dr. José Cruz, MD, is a hematology and oncology expert with the Methodist Healthcare's Adult Blood and Marrow ...

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Webinar 4/21/21: Addressing Clinical Trial Enrollment Barriers in Unique Populations


crowd with masks for clinical trial enrollment barriers

In clinical trials, researchers test life-saving treatments and find ways to prevent and manage disease. But Latinos don't often participate in research. They account for less than 10% of people in federal cancer clinical trials. This makes it hard for researchers to create treatments that work best for Latinos. This is the focus of a new webinar, “Addressing Clinical Trial Enrollment Barriers in Unique Populations,” set for 1 p.m. ET Wednesday, April 21, 2021. The event is sponsored by Fight Colorectal Cancer. Register for the webinar. Panelists are: Amelie G. Ramirez, DrPh, is Director of the Salud America! program and its new project to engage more Latinos in cancer and Alzheimer's research (supported by a grant from Genentech, a member of the Roche Group), ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 4/6: Latino Participation Is Vital in Clinical Trials


female doctor clinical trials

Do you know fewer than 5% of Latinos participate in federal clinical trials? There is a historical lack of targeted research about Latino health inequities and how to address them, and a lack of diversity in clinical trials. Researchers thus have less chance to develop new treatments for this population, which suffers a heavy burden of certain cancers, dementia, obesity, and mental health issues. That's why we're excited to use #SaludTues on April 6, 2021, to tweet about how to increase Latino participation in clinical trials to prevent health disparities, to mark National Minority Health Month in April.  WHAT: Tweetchat: “Latino Participation Is Vital in Clinical Trials" TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, April 6, 2021 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag ...

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UPDATE: Deadline to Endorse Dr. Amelie Ramirez’s Comment on Racial Equity and Diversity in Research is Extended


ndorse Dr. Amelie Ramirez’s Comment on Racial Equity and Diversity in Research!

As a part of its UNITE initiative to address systemic racism in healthcare, The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is looking for feedback on how to advance racial equity and diversity within the biomedical research workforce, as well as advancing research on health inequities. At Salud America!, we believe that increasing diversity among research leaders and clinical trial participants will help achieve true health equity, especially for populations disproportionately impacted by health issues and COVID-19, like the Latino population. If you agree, you can endorse our leader’s comment to NIH. Responses will be accepted through Friday, April 23, 2021. UPDATE: NIH extended the deadline for submitting feedback from April 9 to April 23. 500+ members of the Salud America! ...

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New Bilingual Videos Aim to Increase Latino Clinical Trial, COVID-19 Vaccination Awareness


Bilingual Videos Latino Clinical Trial COVID-19 Vaccination

Historically and presently, Latinos are underrepresented in clinical research. Researchers want to increase diverse participation in clinical trials to ensure that Latinos and other underrepresented populations benefit from advances in public health and medicine, including personalized medicine. This is especially important amid a harmful pandemic that is disproportionately impacting Latinos. In hopes of increasing awareness among Latinos and people burdened by COVID-19, the National Health Institute's (NIH) Community Engagement Alliance (CEAL) Against COVID-19 Disparities Program created a new series of bilingual videos on clinical trials about vaccines and clinical trials to prevent and treat COVID-19. "[Our] program focuses on addressing misinformation around COVID-19, ...

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Latino Participation Vital in Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials


Latino Alzheimer Clinical Trials

Across the board, Latinos are underrepresented in clinical research. Without adequate Latino and minority representation in clinical trials, researchers cannot find differential effects among groups nor advance public health and medicine. To address this, researchers across the country, like those at the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases at UT Health San Antonio, are creating educational interventions to recruit certain racial/ethnic groups in diseases like Alzheimer's that are on the rise among minorities. "Studies should represent the demographics of the country," Dr. Jonca Bull, an assistant commissioner on minority health at the Food and Drug Administration, said in a recent statement. "We need to close that gap so we can better ...

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