The 1st Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center in South Texas Will Tackle Dementia in Latinos


latino alzheimer's disease dementia tweetchat brain healthAlzheimer’s Disease Research Cente Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center

Today, the National Institute on Aging (NIA) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) designated UT Health San Antonio and UT Texas Rio Grande Valley as an Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center to boost research and reduce the Alzheimer's burden among Latinos, who suffer disparities in dementia. The new center is the first in South Texas. It joins 32 other centers nationwide that are accelerating research on effective Alzheimer’s and dementia prevention, diagnostics, and treatments, and improving support for families and caregivers. Salud America! is a center partner to promote its research and clinical trials. "This federal designation by NIA will be transformational as we seek cures and provide the best possible care, based on the most up-to-date knowledge and technology, ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 10/5: Importance of Latino Participation in Clinical Trials in Alzheimer’s Disease


hispanic abuela grandmother with dementia alzheimers clinical trials

Sadly, Latinos are 1.5 times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than whites. Across the board, Latinos are underrepresented in clinical research. Without Latino representation in Alzheimer's clinical trials, researchers cannot find treatments that work best for this population. Researchers also must understand and address the differential role of Alzheimer's among Latinos, and the impact of alcohol, sleep deprivation, diabetes, and more. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021, to tweet about the latest research and beneficial strategies and clinical trials to reduce Alzheimer's disease and promote better brain health among Latinos and all people! WHAT: #SaludTues: Importance of Latino Participation in Clinical Trials in Alzheimer’s Disease TIME/DATE: ...

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Study: Obesity and Heart Factors Combine to Cause Cognitive Decline in Latinos


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Obesity is linked to serious health consequences. The 47% of U.S. Latinos who have obesity are at higher risk for high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, stroke, and certain cancers. Now we're learning that obesity and heart factors combine to cause cognitive decline in Latinos, according to a recent study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease from the University of California San Diego School of Medicine. Researchers studied cognitive exams at two time points — seven years apart —from over 6,000 participants in the Study of Latinos-Investigation of Neurocognitive Aging (SOL-INCA). They also tested participants for obesity cardiometabolic abnormality, which is two or more of high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high triglycerides, and low “good” cholesterol. They found ...

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Latinos Spend $7,167 a Year Caring for Aging Loved Ones


latina caregiver for dementa alzheimers

Latinos spend $7,167 a year caring for aging loved ones, says an AARP survey. While this is actually less than what Whites caregivers spend out of pocket a year ($7,300), the financial strain is greater because it represents almost half the income of Latino caregivers, according to the report. Currently, over 48 million Americans provide unpaid care to an adult family member or friend who has a physical health condition or a mental health issue like Alzheimer's and dementia. Most caregivers say they use their own money to look after their loved ones, like rent or mortgage payments, home modifications like wheelchair ramps, and medical costs. "About half of caregivers say they have experienced financial setbacks. This may mean they have had to curtail their spending, dip into ...

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Study: Alzheimer’s and Dementia Have a Different Impact on Latinos


Adult Daughter Comforting Father Suffering With Dementia

We know Latinos are 1.5 times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and dementia than whites. Now a new study shows that Latinos experience slightly different signs and symptoms of dementia, with more depression and anxiety and a faster rate of functional decline than Blacks or non-Hispanic Whites, AARP reports. Anxiety and depression are risk factors for dementia. Studies have suggested anxiety and depression can cause early manifestations of abnormal protein accumulations in the brain — amyloid and tau — which lead to dementia. In the new study of 5,000 people, researchers found more anxiety among Latinos (25.6 %) than Blacks (16.3 %) or Whites (11.3 %). "We need to do a better job of making mental health services accessible for these groups, with culturally ...

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FDA Approves New Drug for Alzheimer’s, But Scientists Divided Over Decision


FDA Approves New Drug for Alzheimer’s, But Scientists Divided Over Decision

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new drug called Aduhelm (aducanumab) to treat Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. Many are applauding the drug and are encouraged by the scientific progress in a field that has long had limited treatment options. Alzheimer’s affects over 6.2 million people in the U.S., with Latinos being 1.5 times more likely to develop it than white people. “What's really exciting is that aducanumab is the first new FDA-approved Alzheimer's treatment in nearly 20 years, and we're optimistic this will spark a wave of new research and innovation in this space. Patients are excited for that, too, and if aducanumab is the first step toward that brighter future, patients are eager to be part of it,” said Dr. Rany Aburashed, ...

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Studies: COVID-19 May Damage Brain, Increase Risk of Dementia, Alzheimer’s


latino couple elderly wearing face masks to prevent covid-19 coronavirus dementia alzheimers

Many studies are uncovering an alarming link between COVID-19 and dementia. One study found that more than 80% of 509 hospitalized COVID-19 patients had "neurologic manifestations," according to Northwestern Medicine. The brain inflammation and mini-strokes observed in COVID-19 patients may increase their risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia, another study found. Now a new study from the UK found that people diagnosed with COVID-19 in the previous six months were more likely to develop depression, dementia, psychosis and stroke. "The study confirms the researchers suspicions that a COVID-19 diagnosis is not just related to respiratory symptoms, it is also related to psychiatric and neurological problems", Prof Dame Til Wykes, at the Institute of ...

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