Report: Government Can Play a Critical Role in Maternal Health for Women of Color


Maternal Health Women Color

In the last 30 years, maternal health disparities have increased for women of color, according to a new report by the US Commission on Civil Rights. For example, There are 10.3 deaths per 100,000 for Latina women. For white women there are only 6 deaths per 100,000. Moreover, Black women are 3 to 4 times more likely to die than their white peers from pregnancy-related complications. The report also illustrates how government, especially federal government, can play a critical role in changing this fact, according to Norma V. Cantú, chair of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. “[At the federal level] efforts can be made to improve hospital quality, particularly for women of color if maternal health disparities are to be eliminated,” Cantú said. “Improvements in safety ...

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Workshop: How to Advance Systemic Change to Reduce Obesity


obesity workshop roundtable latina girl grocery store fruit

Latinos and other people of color suffer high rates of obesity. This is often due to racist policies and discriminatory practices that create less access to healthcare, healthy food, affordable housing, and financial resources for families of color. What can we do about this? You are invited to join a virtual workshop, "Systems and Obesity: Advances and Innovations for Equitable Health and Well-Being," on Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 (10 a.m. To 2:45 p.m. ET) and Friday, Oct. 29, 2021 (1 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET). This is the third workshop in a series from the Roundtable on Obesity Solutions of the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Find the results of the first and second workshop. "The workshop will explore how to ...

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Report: 1 in 5 Latino Youth Have Obesity


Latino youth have obesity rwjf report from seattle

One in six U.S. youth have obesity, but the issue is worse among Latinos and other youth of color, according to a new report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). More than one in five Latino (21.4%), Black (23.8%), and American Indian/Alaska Native (28.7%) children ages 10-17 have obesity. The reasons? Structural racism and systemic health inequities. Racist policies and discriminatory practices affect our food system, access to healthcare, affordable housing, and critical family supports like childcare, the RWJF report says. Together, the effects of these policies and practices force families into hard choices on how to spend limited resources, especially during COVID-19. “The state of childhood obesity in America is an urgent call to action for leaders at all ...

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How to Build Support for Pregnant Women, Maternal Health in Rural Areas


Maternal Health Rural Areas

Women who give birth face numerous risks leading up to, during, and after delivery. Pregnancy complications can bring about physical and mental effects, including post-partum depression, infections, preterm labor, and other significant risks. Without proper medical care, these risks can increase — especially for women of color and those living in rural communities. That’s why the Rural Health Information Hub released its Rural Maternal Health Toolkit to promote creation of and support for maternal health programs for pregnant women and new mothers in rural communities. “Rural women experience poorer maternal health outcomes compared to their urban counterparts, including higher pregnancy-related mortality,” Lexie Schmidt, an outreach specialist the Rural Health ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 3/23─One Year Later: How COVID-19 Is Impacting Latinos


latina woman student with books face mask to prevent covid-19 coronavirus Hispanic-serving Institutions

For the past year, COVID-19 has ravaged the United States. Data continue to show that Latinos and other people of color are disproportionately affected, amid worsening historical health and social inequities. How can we address this? Let’s use #SaludTues on March 23, 2021, to explore health inequities facing the Latino population over the past year (and long before that), and share solutions and strategies to promote health equity amid pandemic! WHERE: Twitter WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat “One Year Later: How COVID-19 Is Impacting Latinos” WHEN: 1-2 p.m. ET (12-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, March 23, 2021 HOST: Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio (@SaludAmerica) CO-HOSTS: Latinx Voces en Salud Campaign (@VocesenSalud); Dr. Dulce María Ruelas (@DulceMariaMPH) ...

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Help Stop Weight Bias for Obesity Care Week 2021!


obesity care week bicycle rider latino man

Obesity Care Week 2021 (#OCW2021) is here! From Feb. 28 to March 6, 2021, our Salud America! Latino health equity team at UT Health San Antonio, is happy to be an OCW2021 Champion to support this awareness week. Obesity Care Week is an annual public awareness effort to end weight bias, as well as raise awareness, educate and advocate for a better world for people living with obesity. Salud America! research shows that U.S. Latinos face health inequities in many areas—from poverty and social support to access to affordable housing and transit—that contribute to higher rates of obesity. Latino adults have higher obesity rates than their white peers (47% and 37.9%), as do Latino children (20.7% and 11.7%). This, in turn, leads to disparities in diabetes and risk for COVID-19 and ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 2/2: The Chronic Wound of Health Inequity


crowd chronic wound tweetchat

You might know that health inequities, such as a lack of access to health care, housing, or transportation, prevent Latinos and other people of color from getting a fair opportunity to live their healthiest. These inequities can cut deeply, and for a long time. Some experts compare these inequities to a “chronic wound” that doesn’t heal in a timely or expected way, with both little progress and many long-term health consequences. Let’s use #SaludTues on Feb. 2, 2021, to tweet about how advocates, planners, and other leaders can take action to solve the chronic wound of health inequities! WHERE: Twitter WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat “The Chronic Wound of Health Inequities” WHEN: 1-2 p.m. ET (12-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2021 HOST: Salud America! at UT ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 1/19: What Can We Do to Stop Cervical Cancer?



January is Cervical Health Awareness Month. Each year, more than 13,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in the United States. This cancer is hurting communities of color, with Latinas being at a high risk of being diagnosed. But cervical cancer is preventable. Stopping cervical cancer for all communities means education about the causes, prevention, and treatment of HPV and cervical cancer. Join #SaludTues on Jan. 19, 2021, at 1:00 PM EST to tweet about what we can do to stop cervical cancer. WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “What Can We Do to Stop Cervical Cancer?” DATE: Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2020 TIME: 1:00-2:00 p.m. EST (10:00-11:00 p.m. PST) WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: Cervivor (@IamCervivor), ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 10/27: How to Reduce Breast Cancer and Improve Survivorship among Latinas


breast cancer prevention latinas diverse women tweetchat

Breast cancer doesn’t impact every women the same. Among Latinas, breast cancer is the No. 1 cancer killer. Many Latinas face unique survivorship journeys, shaped by cultural and spiritual beliefs and struggles with barriers to care, screening, patient-doctor communication, and other social determinants of health. To recognize Breast Cancer Awareness Month (October), let’s use #SaludTues on Oct. 27, 2020, to tweet about the latest progress in Latina breast cancer data and research, the importance of breast cancer screening, and tips and stories for prevention and survivorship! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat “How to Reduce Breast Cancer and Improve Survivorship among Latinas” WHERE: Twitter WHEN: 1-2 p.m. ET (12-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020 HOST: Salud ...

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