Study: Gum Disease Linked to Breast Cancer-Risk



Postmenopausal women with gum disease could be at a higher risk for breast cancer, Reuters reports. Researchers at the University of Buffalo found that middle aged and older women with gum disease who smoked cigarettes or had quit within the past 20 years had a higher risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer, the leading cause of cancer death among Latinas. For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 73,000 postmenopausal women who did not have breast cancer. “About one quarter said they had periodontal disease, a chronic inflammation and infection of the gum tissue around the base of the teeth. Gum disease has also been tied to heart disease, stroke, diabetes and some other cancers.” After following the women for six years researchers found 2,100 women had been ...

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Study: A Dose of Gratitute Keeps the Heart Young and Healthy



It’s the time of the year when we’re feeling grateful for being healthy, having a loving family and a job, but do you know gratitude can also keep your heart healthy?   A study  led by Paul Mills, professor of family medicine and public health at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine recruited 186 men and women who suffered from heart disease “either through years of sustained high blood pressure or as a result of a heart attack or even an infection of the heart itself.” During the study Prof. Mills asked each participant to fill out a questionnaire to rate how grateful they were for the people, places or things in their lives. “We found that more gratitude in these patients was associated with better mood, better sleep, less fatigue ...

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The Symptoms of a Heart Attack



In the United States heart attacks are the main killer of men and women, especially Latinos who are at higher risk of cardiovascular disease. According to the National Institutes of Health, a heart attack occurs “when the flow of oxygen-rich blood to a section of heart muscle suddenly becomes blocked and the heart can't get oxygen. If blood flow isn't restored quickly, the section of heart muscle begins to die.” Knowing the symptoms of a heart attack and getting help as soon as possible can save your life. The most common symptoms are: Chest Pain Stomach pain Shortness of breath Anxiety Lightheadedness Sweating Nausea and Vomiting If you experience any of these symptoms don’t wait and call ...

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America is Kicking the Habit



According to a new report by the CDC more Americans are smoking less this year compared to 2014, Latin Times reports. The CDC’s Health Interview Survey show only 15.2 % of U.S. adults smoke on a regular basis compared to 16.8% in 2014. “Latinos (10.4%) were less likely to smoke than whites (17.1%) and African Americans (18.1%), the data show.” Among young adults 18-44 the smoking rate was 17%, very similar to the rate among middle-aged adults (16.9%). Among senior citizens the rate was even lower only 7.5%. The current rates show a significant drop compared to 2009 when 20.6% of adults were regular ...

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Diabetics At-Higher Risk of Oral Infections



Diabetics are more susceptible to oral infections such as gingivitis and periodontitis than those that don’t suffer from diabetes, Univision Salud reports. Lower flow of saliva among diabetics causes burning sensations in the mouth skyrocketing the incidence of cavities and other infections. And those “who don’t control their sugar levels tend to have more oral health problems, particularly dental gum retractions.” Gingivitis and periodontitis are the most common oral health problems among diabetics, but more serious ones such as Thrush (candidiasis) it's also common. The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) recommends: Control glucose levels in the blood Brush your teeth and use dental floss every day Visit your dentist ...

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La salud de los hispanos en los EE.UU.



SaludToday Guest Blogger Jenny Castro Un estudio realizado por el Centro para el Control y Prevención de las Enfermedades de EE.UU. (CDC, por sus siglas en inglés) develó que los hispanos nacidos en este país son casi el doble de propensos a una enfermedad del corazón y cáncer, según el Colegio Americano de Cardiología, esto se debe a que comparado con otros grupos raciales y étnicos, los hispanos están menos informados respecto a las enfermedades del corazón, ignorando que estas son de las principales causas de muerte en Estado Unidos. Por otro lado el CDC  estima que los hispanos son el doble de propensos a morir de diabetes y enfermedades del hígado que los caucásicos. En relación al acceso a la salud, más del doble de los hispanos menores de 65 que no tienen ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 1p ET 6/23/15: “How to Get More Latinos to Quit Smoking”



About 5 million U.S. Latinos smoke, and lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among Latino men and second-leading cause among Latina women, statistics show. Why is this happening—and how can Latinos quit smoking and tobacco for good? Let’s use #SaludTues on June 23, 2015, to tweet information, resources, and tips that can help Latinos both young and old kick the habit now (and kick the habit for good!): WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “How to Get More Latinos to Quit Smoking” DATE: Tuesday, June 23, 2015 TIME: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT) WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludToday CO-HOSTS: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (@VeteransHealth), the National Cancer Institute (@SmokefreeUS) We’ll open the floor to your stories and experiences as ...

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Study: U.S. Immigration Increases Smoking Among Latinos, Asians



U.S. immigration may result in increased smoking in Latinos and Asians, according to a new study reported by Science World Report. The study, led by Rice University, found that Latino immigrant men’s smoking prevalence was more than twice that of women’s (29.5 percent and 12.6 percent, respectively). Smoking prevalence among Asian immigrant men was more than four times that of Asian immigrant women (30.4 percent and 7.1 percent, respectively). For smoking frequency, Asian men on average smoked 2.5 more cigarettes per day than Asian women, compared with 1.5 more cigarettes per day that Latino men smoked than Latino women. The study also found that smoking increases with duration of U.S. residence among Asian immigrants (both prevalence and frequency) and among Latino immigrants ...

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Why Do Latinos Struggle with Asthma?



Latinos are at high risk for asthma because prevalence, illness and deaths are strongly correlated with urban air quality, indoor allergens, lack of patient education and inadequate medical care, according to an American Lung Association report. Both asthma and allergies are caused by the body's immune response to environmental triggers, such that some allergens can also trigger asthma, according to Kaiser Permanente. Other irritants can trigger asthma, too, such as the flu. So what can Latinos do? To make an action plan, visit Kaiser Permanente's bilingual website. You can also check out Spanish-language resources from the American Lung Association: Breathe Well, Live Well is an adult asthma self-management education program led by an American Lung Association-trained ...

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