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14 Things Latinos Should Know About the 2020 Census


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How important is the 2020 Census? Well, the results will determine political power, representation in Congress, and funding for schools, hospitals, roads, and social services in your community for the next 10 years. Here are some Q&As that emphasize the need to count Latinos and all people! 1. Why Is There a Census? The U.S. Constitution requires the government count everyone living in the country regardless of race, ethnicity, or citizenship status. The Census Act of 1790 created the first census. The government has conducted it every 10 years since to determine a population count, not a citizenship count. “The data collected affect our nation’s ability to ensure equal representation and equal access to important governmental and private sector resources for all ...

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Medical Debt Plagues Texans of Color


medical debt collection via NPR

Texas Latinos and other communities of color are among the hardest hit by medical debt, according to a new report. The report, from the Center for Public Policy Priorities, shows that 1 in 4 Texans (23%) has medical debt. In communities of color, that rises to nearly 1 in 3 Texans (29%). These rates are higher than in other states and the nation. "When people can’t pay their medical bills, costs turn into mounting medical debt," according to the report. "[This medical debt] compromises patients’ health and financial security, harms their credit scores, and can even limit a patient’s housing, job, and health opportunities." Alarming Medical Debt among Texans of Color The median medical debt in collections owed in Texas is $850. Texans of color owe slightly more at $875. ...

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Does Your State Ban Salary History Inquiries?


salary history ban

Inequities in pay follow women from job to job. Employers that request an applicant’s salary history─a long-time standard practice to set compensation for new-hires─perpetuate these gender pay inequities. “Relying on salary history allows a new employer to continue underpaying a woman who faced a pay gap and lost wages due to bias or discrimination at a previous job,” according to a 2018 report from the American Association of University Women (AAUW). One method to close the gender pay gap is to ban employers from relying on previous or current salary information when setting pay for new employees. Closing the gender pay gap is good for physical, mental and social health. However, less than half of states have such bans. Find out which places have banned salary ...

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Salud Talks Podcast Episode Six: “Equity in Kindness”



Kindness, empathy, and compassion are all things most can agree are good for the world. Yet, how are people practicing these virtues in everyday life? Dante Jones, the founder of San Antonio’s Roll Models SATX program, joins Salud Talks to discuss how we all can treat each other better. Check out this discussion on the #SaludTalks Podcast, Episode Six, "Equity in Kindness"! WHAT: A #SaludTalks discussion on how we treat each other GUESTS: Dante Jones, the founder of San Antonio’s Roll Models SATX youth-mentorship program WHERE: Available wherever fine podcasts are downloaded, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, SoundCloud, Tune In, and others WHEN: The episode went live at 6 a.m., Oct. 9, 2019 In this episode, we explored questions such as: Why is ...

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Business Funding Bias: Another Obstacle for Latinos


Latino business funding

Latino-owned businesses struggle with bias and racism when it comes to securing financing, according to a report published by the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative (SLEI). The State of Latino Entrepreneurship report examines national trends underlying Latino business growth. Lack of business funding—due to bias—is the report's prime concern. “It’s easy to slip into the notion that everyone is a racist, and that’s wrong,” said Jerry I. Porras, who leads the SLEI at Stanford Graduate School of Business, in a press release. “But there’s a lot of unconscious racial bias — not intended, if you will, but a product of our socialization. Over time, if you’re able to recognize how this bias is creeping into our culture, you can consciously make the ...

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11 Real Ways to Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month


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Hispanic Heritage Month is here! This annual U.S. observance, from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, celebrates the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. We at Salud America! invite you to think outside the box and celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month in these awesome ways. 1. Find Out How Hispanic Heritage Month Started U.S. Congressmen Edward R. Roybal of Los Angeles and Henry B. Gonzales were among those who introduced legislation on the topic in 1968. President Lyndon Johnson implemented the observance as Hispanic Heritage Week that year. U.S. Rep. Esteban E. Torres of Pico Rivera proposed the observance be expanded to cover its current 30-day period. President Ronald Reagan ...

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Your Skin Color May Decide Where Your Ambulance Ride Ends Up


ambulance color latino emergency room visit

Latinos and blacks are more likely to be taken by ambulance to safety-net hospital emergency rooms, and not always the closest hospital, according to a new study. National guidelines require EMS transportation to the nearest suitable hospital. However, the study, led by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine, found large racial/ethnic differences for where emergency patients are taken. Latinos and blacks were more likely than whites to be taken to a safety-net hospital—one with a legal obligation or mission to give health care regardless of insurance status. This suggests "ambulance diversion" bias, where ambulances don't take certain patients to the nearest suitable hospital.  "The cause for this observed pattern is unknown and needs to be further studied to ...

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How Hispanic Heritage Month Became a Thing


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At Salud America!, we're excited to discuss Latino health during Hispanic Heritage Month! This annual U.S. observance, from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, celebrates the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. How did this observance start? U.S. Congressmen Edward R. Roybal of Los Angeles and Henry B. Gonzales were among those who introduced legislation on the topic in 1968. President Lyndon Johnson implemented the observance as Hispanic Heritage Week that year. U.S. Rep. Esteban E. Torres of Pico Rivera proposed the observance be expanded to cover its current 30-day period. President Ronald Reagan implemented the expansion to Hispanic Heritage Month. It was enacted into law on ...

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