Read More Healthy & Cohesive Cultures Articles



#SaludTues Tweetchat 8/25: Secondhand Smoke and COVID-19



Smoking kills — it also harms those who work near, live with, or are close to a smoker. Newfound data shows that researchers are beginning to link secondhand smoke exposure and worsened COVID-19 outcomes. As the pandemic continues to spread throughout the US, health advocates are calling for more significant restrictions on smoke exposure. Let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020, to tweet about secondhand smoke exposure, it’s harmful impacts, and how it can influence someone’s experience with COVID-19! WHAT: #SaludTues: Secondhand Smoke and COVID-19 TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. EST (Noon-1 p.m. CST), Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: @ANR_Smokefree PARTICIPANTS: @tobaccofreefla ...

Read More

Building a Community-Based Workforce to Address COVID-19 Recovery, Public Safety


meeting community-based social workers amid covid-19

Too many social support tasks fall to armed police officers. As local leaders discuss COVID-19 recovery plans, they need to consider how to address these social support issues in tandem with economic issues. Many cities are exploring how to reform or reimagine police. This often includes partnering with community-based social, behavioral, and mental health services. However, community partners may lack capacity for city-wide change. That’s why cities need to build a community-based workforce to coordinate community development, help families recover from the pandemic’s economic fallout, and reform police, simultaneously. Expensive Spending on Traditional Policing Public safety is a major city expense. Of the 50 largest cities, spending on police accounts for the ...

Read More

A National Museum of the American Latino is Closer Than Ever


Latino museum

On July 27, 2020, the U.S. House unanimously approved a bill authorizing the Smithsonian Institution to build a National American Latino Museum. Introduced by New York Representative José Serrano and co-sponsored by 295 democrats and republicans, the museum will join 11 other Smithsonian museums along the National Mall in Washington D.C., such as the National Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Museum of the American Indian. A companion bill for the Latino museum was introduced in the Senate in May 2019. “Spanish was the first non-native language to be spoken in the United States,” said Texas Democratic Rep. and chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Joaquin Castro, according to The Texan. “Latinos have fought in every U.S. war. Food and ...

Read More

U.S. Latinos Reach Record-High 18.5% of Nation’s Population


U.S. Latinos are a rising population group

The U.S. Latino population grew to 60.6 million in 2019, a record 18.5% of the total population, according to new Census Bureau data. Here are all the details you need to know. The U.S. Latino Population Continues to Grow The U.S. population reached 328,239,523 in 2019. Latinos reached 60,572,237 in 2019. Now at 18.5% of the U.S. population, Latinos are the second-largest racial/ethnic group, behind non-Latino Whites (60.1%). They have greater numbers than Blacks (13.4), Asians (5.9%), and American Indians or Alaska Natives (1.3%). Latinos accounted for 16% of the U.S. population in 2010. In fact, the U.S. Latino population is up by 10,093,626 from 2010 to 2019, or 20% growth, according to the new Census Bureau data. Growth of the U.S. Latino Population Is Slowing Even ...

Read More

Young POC Face High Risk of COVID-19 Hospitalization in the U.S.


Young POC Face High Hospitalizations in US

While the elderly are highly susceptible to becoming infected with the coronavirus, as well as its effects, young adults aren't off the hook, either. Those under the age of 44 make up a significant portion of coronavirus hospitalizations in the US, according to a new CDC report on July 10, 2020. Considering the high rate of infection among minority groups, young people of color are also facing significant threats. "I think everyone should be paying attention to this, and it's not just going to be the elderly," Stephen S. Morse, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health told New York Times. "There will be people age 20 and up. They do have to be careful, even if they think that they're young and healthy." New Data Sheds Light The CDC's ...

Read More

San Bernardino County Is 1st in California to Declare Racism a Public Health Crisis


diverse fists to declare racism a public health crisis

In San Bernardino County (50% Latino), the Board of Supervisors voted 5-0 this week to make it California's first county to adopt a resolution to declare racism as a public health crisis, the L.A. Times reports. The resolution recognizes that racism "creates unfair disadvantages to some individuals and communities" and "results in disparities in family stability, health and mental wellness, education, employment, economic development, public safety, criminal justice and housing." In addition, the resolution commits to action, according to the report: Enhance diversity in the county workforce; Study existing county policies and practices "through a lens of racial equality to promote and support efforts that prioritize health for people of color"; Plan collaborations ...

Read More