Webinar 9/23/21: Metastatic Breast Cancer in the Latino Community

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Breast Cancer Latino Community
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Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in Latinas.

Systemic health inequities contribute to lower rates of breast cancer screening among Latinos, which leads to cancer diagnoses at later disease stages.

This is why we’re sharing Susan G. Komen’s 2021 ongoing webinar series on metastatic breast cancer (MBC)!

The next two webinars, “MBC in the Hispanic/Latino Community,” are set for 6 p.m. CT Sept. 23, 2021, in English and 6 p.m. CT Sept. 30, 2021, in Spanish.

breast cancer webinarPanelists are:

Panelists will foster a safe, collaborative space to discuss practical resources to help cancer survivors make decisions for improved physical and emotional health.

Patient advocates also will talk about how they and their families cope with metastatic breast cancer.

REGISTER FOR THE WEBINAR!

What Else Can You Do to Support Latinas?

Volunteer for a clinical trial!

Clinical trials, which are studies to find more effective treatments or achieve a better understand breast cancer and survival among minorities.

Dr. Amelie Ramirez, director of the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) and the Salud America! program at UT Health San Antonio, is creating new ways to encourage Latinos to volunteer for cancer and Alzheimer’s clinical trials. This work is supported by a grant from Genentech, a member of the Roche Group.

If you’re in San Antonio, volunteer for:

  • A cancer clinical trial at the Mays Cancer Center at UT Health San Antonio: https://salud.to/maystrials
  • An Alzheimer’s disease clinical trial at the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases at UT Health San Antonio: https://salud.to/biggstrials
  • The AHEAD or REACH clinical trials at the Biggs Institute

You can also use the National Cancer Institute’s online search tool to find a cancer clinical trial in your area!

“Latinos in clinical trials are not only helping themselves, they’re building a future with better treatments that can help their families and communities in the future,” Ramirez said.

Explore More:

Cancer, Clinical Trials

By The Numbers By The Numbers

28

percent

of Latino kids suffer four or more adverse childhood experiences (ACES).

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