Been in a Clinical Trial? We Want to Share Your Story!

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Are you Latino?

Have you participated in a clinical trial related to Alzheimer’s or cancer?

If so, we want to talk with you and share your story!

Salud America! is looking to interview and write stories about heroes like you — Latinos who have participated in a clinical trial!

In doing so, we hope to showcase the benefits of volunteering for a clinical trial to inspire other Latinos to volunteer, too.

Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez’s Salud America! program at UT Health San Antonio is sharing the stories of clinical trial heroes with the support of Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, to create Latino-focused recruitment strategies and systems for clinical trials in cancer treatment and Alzheimer’s disease.

“Clinical trials are studies that help researchers learn more and more to help slow, manage, and treat Alzheimer’s and cancer,” Ramirez said. “Clinical trials help us fight for our familia.”

To share your story, or share someone we could contact for a story, email Salud America! Digital Content Curators Josh McCormack or Pramod Sukumaran.
Just like Emilia Asto-Flores, who shared how she joined a COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial.

“Representation is important in a clinical trial,” Asto-Flores said. “You wouldn’t want a clinical trial to be just consisted of one group. These results need to be proportionate to our diverse communities. It’s so important for us as members of the [Latino] community to take that leadership role that could save lives. So those that are a part of that can say, ‘Hey, these results care representative of my community.’” latina caregiver for dementa alzheimers

Elsada Wilson shared how she joined a clinical trial at Mays Cancer Center at UT Health San Antonio and found hope for herself, her family, and the future. The trial had a huge impact in her journey with breast cancer, which eventually receded.

“If it helps me then I’ll be able to help my family and help other people that need help,” Wilson said. “I wanted to help others.”

Stories like these show why sharing one’s experiences—in hopes of spurring on action from their peers—can make such a big impact

“It is vital for Latinos to participate in clinical trials,” Ramirez said. “This kind of research can go on to save the lives of countless people. But in order for that to become a reality, we need to see accurate, equitable representation in clinical trials. One way Latinos can help is by signing up to participate in a clinical trial.”

We need to hear from Latino clinical trial volunteers because it helps give people an insight into why these clinical trials are so important.

“Latinos in clinical trials are not only helping themselves, they’re building a future with better treatments that can help their familia and communities in the future,” Ramirez said.

For example, if you’re in San Antonio, volunteer for:

  • A cancer clinical trial at the Mays Cancer Center at UT Health San Antonio: https://salud.to/maystrials
  • An Alzheimer’s disease clinical trial at the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases at UT Health San Antonio: https://salud.to/biggstrials
  • The REACH trial; for each visit, volunteers are eligible for $100.
  • The AHEAD trial; for each visit, volunteers are eligible for $50.

To share your story, or share someone we could contact for a story, email Salud America! Digital Content Curators Josh McCormack or Pramod Sukumaran.

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By The Numbers By The Numbers

28

percent

of Latino kids suffer four or more adverse childhood experiences (ACES).

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