1 in 5 People on Transplant Waiting List are Latino



More than 100,000 people are waiting for a life-changing organ transplant in the US, according to the American Heart Association.  The stark reality is that nearly 23% of those on the transplant candidate waiting list are Latino — that’s one out of every five people.   In fact, 59% of all transplant candidates on the waiting list are Black, Latino, or Asian. These populations are disproportionately affected by chronic diseases, leading to the need for a transplant.   In 2023, Latinos received 8,540 of the over 46,000 transplants performed, including 580 hearts, according to the American Heart Association.   Despite the number of transplants performed and Latinos on the waiting list, organ donation remains low in the Latino community.  Latino Organ ...

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What Does Life Look Like with a Brain Tumor?



Of course, no one wants to hear they have cancer. But if you or someone in your familia has a brain tumor, it is natural to wonder what life will look like. This is what we call “quality of life” (QoL), or an individual’s sense of well-being and ability to enjoy and participate in life. “For those living with a brain tumor, QoL may encompass a wide range of physical, psychosocial, and emotional concerns stemming from loss of functionality and changes in personality,” according to the National Brain Tumor Society (NBTS). From rehabilitation to mental health to return-to-work resources, let’s dive deeper into QoL and what it means for someone with a brain tumor. Facing a Brain Tumor Diagnosis A brain tumor or other cancer diagnosis is life-changing. The ...

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Free Virtual Program Aims to Teach a Patient-Centered Approach to Research



In recent years, researchers have made a larger effort to tap into previously underrepresented communities, such as communities of color, to create more inclusive research that benefits everyone.  But many people still have deep-rooted mistrust of research.  And not all researchers who work with these communities end up bringing the benefits of their research back to boost the health of those communities.   The PATIENTS Program at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy is attempting to rewrite the narrative and give researchers, patients, caregivers, and others the tools to provide a continuous patient-centered approach to research.   The PATIENTS Professors Academy is a free, virtual training course centered around improving health equity and the health outcomes ...

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5 Big Accomplishments for the All of Us Research Program



For the last several years, the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) All of Us Research Program has endeavored to collect the health data of over 1 million Americans to ensure healthcare works for all of us.  Are they close to 1 million participants?  How has it helped boost research?  Let’s look at five notable milestones the program has reached in its mission to build a health data network that looks like all of us.  1. Increasing the Diversity of Research Participation With help from local community partnerships, including UT Health San Antonio, across the country, over 790,000 people nationwide have decided to join the program’s expansive and inclusive research network, the program announced in a recent news release.  In addition, over 540,000 ...

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Get Moving with a Free Child Physical Activity Program You Can Do from Home!



Many Latino children have pressing mental health needs but are not getting adequate mental health care, studies have shown.  COVID-19 didn’t help, either.  The pandemic heightened social isolation, dependence on smartphones and social media, and mental health issues among young people.   Meanwhile, opportunities declined for physical activity – a proven method for treating disorders such as depression and anxiety.  Loss of physical activity can harm physical, emotional, social, and mental health.  This is why a PhD student at Michigan State University is offering a free online program geared to increasing physical activity to improve mental health in Latino children between the ages of 7 and 11.  About the Physical Activity Program  The program is part of a ...

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For Your Familia: Understanding Low Grade Glioma



U.S. Army soldier Tony Rentas, a native of Puerto Rico who dreamed of serving in the military all his life, had a seizure while on a mission in Kosovo. Tony was diagnosed with a low grade glioma, a rare type of brain tumor. He had no idea what a low grade glioma was. So, he started Googling. He found little that helped him understand this diagnosis and what it meant for him and his familia, and even less was available in Spanish. That is why Tony is sharing his story and participating in the International Low Grade Glioma Registry, which hopes to learn more about the best ways to treat these tumors across different groups of people, including members of the Hispanic/Latino community. “One of the biggest things that I wanted to do is help people as much as I can,” Tony ...

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Tony Rentas: A ‘Soldado’ Helping Others Fight Battles Against Brain Tumors


tony rentas low grade glioma bran cancer survivor

Growing up in Puerto Rico, Tony Rentas dreamed of joining the U.S. military. He wanted to serve his country, set a good example for his son, and make sure his family was taken care of. In 2009, he joined the U.S. Army, making his dream a reality. Tony served as a military intelligence specialist. Over a dozen years, he deployed twice, traveled around the world, made great friends, experienced different cultures, helped people, and provided for his family. Then he got some harrowing news. After suffering a temporal lobe seizure, Tony – a husband and father of two children –was diagnosed with a low grade glioma, a type of cancerous brain tumor, in June 2020. “I remember walking out of that appointment, sitting in the car, just trying to process things. A couple of tears ...

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How Do We Know if Complete Streets (or Any Streets) Are Meeting the Needs of Community Members?


How Do We Know if Complete Streets (or Any Streets) Are Meeting the Needs of Community Members?

We know little about which transportation investments or initiatives are reducing transportation barriers and meeting people’s transportation needs. For example, are Complete Streets policies meeting the needs of community members? As Smart Growth America releases its best practices to evaluate the success of Complete Streets efforts, we at Salud America! want to draw attention to how transportation needs and barriers have been conceptualized. Across the fields of urban planning, public health, and health care are claims about how transportation impacts health and quality of life. However, regarding these impacts, transportation is often conceptualized only in terms of physical activity, pollution, safety, and/or access to medical care. Although transportation is often ...

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7 Reasons to Do SDoH Screening in Healthcare


sdoh screening patient doctor latino woman pregnant baby

Where you live can have a big impact on your health. Non-medical factors like where we are born, live, work, and age — known as social determinants of health (SDoH) — can influence health for better or worse. However, the U.S. has struggled to identify and help people with SDoH issues. That's where SDoH screening comes in. SDoH screening is a questionnaire given to patients in a healthcare setting to help providers identify non-medical barriers to health. These include issues like financial hardship, transportation, housing, food, employment, and safety. Patients can then be referred to helpful community resources. Here are seven reasons to implement SDoH screening in your healthcare system, hospital, or clinic. 1. SDoH Screening Helps Patients Speak Up SDoH ...

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