Write a Medical School Oath to Fight for Social Justice!


young male doctor swearing medical school oath

Medical students start their journey to be a doctor with an ethical oath. But the classic Hippocratic Oath and other versions are missing doctors' modern obligations for social justice. You can use the Salud America! action pack, “Write a Medical School Oath to Fight for Social Justice,” to write your own medical school oath to reflect doctors’ ever-evolving responsibilities to address systemic racism, social justice, and health equity. The action pack has materials and technical assistance to help you connect with your peers and school leaders, draft a new or updated medical oath, and build support to address health and social inequities. "Writing a modern medical school oath can be a meaningful experience for students, and better reflect the evolving dynamics of the ...

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How Farmers Markets Can Promote Racial Justice


farmers market week racial justice

Does your town have a farmers market? Farmers markets are a path to healthy food access. They are especially important amid the push for nutrition security and racial/ethnic justice. Fortunately, the Farmers Market Coalition is stepping up to support farmers markets. They’re supporting markers, creating an anti-racist toolkit, and sharing how markets increase equitable access to healthy, fresh produce and social connections, and engage farmers in the local economy. "As hubs for connection and community resilience, farmers markets have particularly risen to the occasion this year by providing a necessary sense of unity and stability during a time of great uncertainty," according to the coalition. "Farmers markets don’t just happen. The hard work of farmers market operators ...

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The Harsh Impact of Alcohol on the Latino Community


Latino drinking alcohol.

Alcoholism in the U.S. has increased since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. “A one-year increase in alcohol consumption in the U.S. during the COVID-19 pandemic is estimated to cause 8,000 additional deaths from alcohol-related liver disease, 18,700 cases of liver failure, and 1,000 cases of liver cancer by 2040,” according to a press release from the Massachusetts General Hospital. In addition, deaths caused by alcohol are up, too. After increasing 2.2% a year over the previous two decades, deaths involving alcohol jumped 25.5% between 2019 to 2020, totaling 99,107 deaths,” according to a 2022 study. “Deaths involving alcohol reflect hidden tolls of the pandemic. Increased drinking to cope with pandemic-related stressors, shifting alcohol policies, and disrupted ...

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Inflation: What Does it Mean for Latinos?


Inflation

Since COVID-19 swept the nation in 2020, it seems that adversity is everywhere. And now – in the summer of 2022 – inflation has reached a record high (9.1%) since November 1981, increasing the cost of gas, groceries, utilities, rent, and other necessities. Could the COVID-19 pandemic be to blame? And how does the rising cost of living impact Latinos? Here’s what you need to know. What Caused Inflation? The exact cause of current US inflation is multi-faceted, and it’s important to note that other countries are feeling the effects of inflation, too. While some inflation is attributed to the COVID-19 pandemic (2.5 percentage points), world events, such as the war in Ukraine, have also played a role. Nevertheless, the pandemic contributed to inflation primarily by ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 9/6: Infection Control and Its Critical Role in Healthcare Settings


Infection Control and Prevention cleaning disinfection nurse hospital doctor

Infection control saves lives, and every frontline healthcare worker plays a critical role. To better support healthcare workers to prevent infections in health care, it is essential to equip them with the infection control knowledge they need and deserve to protect themselves and their patients from infectious disease threats, like COVID-19. This is why CDC launched Project Firstline, an infection control training and education collaborative designed with healthcare workers, for healthcare workers. Project Firstline intends to provide equity of understanding for all: nurses, certified nursing assistants, environmental service technicians, doctors, allied health professionals, and administrative/intake staff. The innovative content is designed so that regardless of previous ...

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Donate a Biospecimen Today to Improve Latino Health Outcomes!



Have you ever wanted to help improve Latino health? Now is your chance! The National Institutes of Health’s All of Us Research Program is recruiting at least one million diverse people to share information about their health history and environment. Information collected for the database helps researchers learn how biology, lifestyle, and our environment affects our health. As part of the effort, participants donate a biospecimen in the form of a blood or saliva sample. Biospecimens can help researchers find new ways to prevent, diagnose, or treat diseases, such as Alzheimer’s or cancer, among Latinos and other groups. “We may study your samples to measure things that naturally occur within our bodies, for example, cholesterol,” according to the All of Us ...

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Caring For Caregivers: Support for Families Impacted by Dementia


Latina Caregiver

Caregivers are a lifeline for people living with dementia. But who is the lifeline for caregivers? The Caring for the Caregivers program at UT Health San Antonio serves as a resource and support for patient caregivers and families through evidence-based education and research. “We envision a community where family caregivers are valued, respected, and supported with compassion. We are committed to values of social justice, collaboration, and family-centeredness in research and practice,” according to the Caring for Caregivers webpage. Learn about the programs, events, and tools that can help your family! Latino Caregivers by the Number Latinos are greatly impacted by dementia. About 13% of Latinos who are 65 or older have Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia, ...

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New Study Sheds Light on Maternal Health Issues and Need for Diversity Among Nurses


Nurse diversity

Nurses are lifelines for mothers-to-be, helping recognize complications early during labor and delivery. Maternal health for Latinas could improve even further with a more diverse nurse workforce, according to a new study in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Researchers found that Latinas who gave birth in states with the highest proportion of minority nurses experienced a 31% reduced risk of severe adverse maternal health outcomes, including eclampsia, blood transfusion, hysterectomy, or intensive care unit admission. Why might this be? Researchers believe that if the nurse workforce more closely resembled the diversity of patients, there could be a reduction in provider implicit bias, or subconscious preferences for white patients over those of color. “A ...

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Report: The Deadliest Cities for People Walking Are Now Even More Dangerous


dangerous by design street

Although driving declined in 2020, U.S. pedestrian deaths increased, especially among Latinos and other people of color, according to the new Dangerous by Design report from Smart Growth America and the National Complete Streets Coalition. Pedestrian deaths have risen each year since 2009 – up 62% overall since then. Why? Roads in America are designed and funded primarily to quickly move people driving. Also, vehicles have been getting larger and more powerful. But speed comes at the expense of safety. Although transportation planners, engineers, and agencies claim to seek simultaneous goals of speed and safety, these two goals are incompatible, signified by the rising trend in pedestrian deaths. “States must use the enormous freedom and flexibility of federal ...

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