#SaludTues Tweetchat 1/4: Raising Awareness for Cervical Cancer


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Each year, more than 14,000 people are diagnosed with cervical cancer in the United States. This cancer is especially hurting communities of color, with Latinas at a high risk of a diagnosis. But cervical cancer is preventable. Stopping cervical cancer for Latinas and all communities means equitable education about the causes, prevention, and treatment of HPV and cervical cancer. Join #SaludTues at 1 p.m. EST on Jan. 4, 2022, to tweet about how we can stop cervical cancer in celebration of Cervical Cancer Awareness Month in January. WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: “What Can We Do to Stop Cervical Cancer?” DATE: Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022 TIME: 1:00-2:00 p.m. EST (10:00-11:00 p.m. PST) WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: ...

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Exploring the Severe Burden of Stomach Cancer among Latinos


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Stomach cancer, also called gastric cancer, disproportionately impacts Latinos. In fact, U.S. Latino men and women are twice as likely as their White peers to develop invasive gastric cancer, according to a 2021 report. But little is known about regional differences. That is why Dr. Dorothy Long Parma of UT Health San Antonio and her colleagues conducted a study to analyze gastric cancer rates for Latinos in South Texas, Texas, and the United States. "We found that overall stomach cancer incidence rates in Texas and South Texas were higher in Latinos than in non-Latino Whites, despite lower frequencies in the state and South Texas region compared to the United States," said Long Parma, assistant professor/research at the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) in the ...

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The $21 Billion Burden of Cancer Care for U.S. Patients



The patient economic burden for cancer in the U.S. was $21.09 billion, according to the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer in JNCI: The Journal of the National Cancer Institute. “[This total is] made up of patient out-of-pocket costs of $16.22 billion and patient time costs of $4.87 billion,” according to the annual report. As technology, cancer research, and medicine advances, the effectiveness of therapy treatments only seem to proliferate.  Though this is good news, the reality is that modern cancer treatments are a financial burden to people of color, who also face barriers to equitable cancer care.  Latinos in particular face obstacles such as poor health literacy, concerns about test efficacy, and language and cultural beliefs related to cancer, ...

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Webinar Dec. 14: How to Encourage Latinos to Participate in Clinical Trials



Latinos represent 18.5% of the U.S. population, but are far less than 10% of those in federal cancer and drug studies. This makes it hard for researchers to create treatments that work best for Latinos. To address this issue, you’re invited to join us for “How to Encourage Latinos to Participate in Clinical Trials,” the first webinar of a new series, “Let’s Address Health Equity Together,” at 11 a.m. CST on Dec. 14, 2021. This Zoom webinar will help health care professionals understand the lack of Latino participation in clinical trials and explore strategies and system-changing advocacy actions to improve Latino enrollment in clinical trials. "This webinar will help doctors, nurses, researchers and other healthcare professionals take action for diversifying ...

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Webinar Series: Let’s Address Health Equity Together


Webinar Series Let’s Address Health Equity Together

Health equity is where everyone has a fair, just opportunity to be healthier. How can we reach this ideal, especially as Latinos face health disparities rooted in systemic inequities in income, health care, food, housing, and discrimination? You're invited to a new webinar series, "Let’s Address Health Equity Together," a collaboration of the Salud America! program at the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health San Antonio, the Mays Cancer Center at UT Health San Antonio, and Genentech. Six webinars are set for the next year: 12/14/21: How to Encourage Latinos to Participate in Clinical Trials 2/10/22: Targeting Social Needs in Efforts to Prevent and Reduce Cancer 4/25/22: Overcoming Implicit Bias in the Doctor’s Office and Research Studies 6/9/22: ...

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Dr. Amelie Ramirez to Serve as Chair the Women in Cancer Research Council


Dr. Amelie Ramirez answering COVID-19 vaccine latino questions

Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, director of Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio and a leading health disparities researcher, will serve as the 2021-2022 chair of the the Women in Cancer Research Council of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). The council organizes the activities of the members of the Women in Cancer Research group. This includes fostering career development, recognizing scientific achievements, and advising AACR leadership. Ramirez is currently serving a three-year term on the council through December 2022. "It is a great honor to serve as Chair of the Women in Cancer Research (WICR) Council for the 2021-2022 term. Despite the challenges we have seen during the pandemic, I am proud to say women in science are still making strides and progressing in the ...

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Latinos Suffer Higher Rates of Liver, Cervical, and Stomach Cancers


Latinos Suffer Higher Rates Cancers

Cancer can affect anyone. But Latinos experience higher rates of infection-related cancers, ones that are preventable, than their white peers, according to a new study from the American Cancer Society (ACS). In fact, Latinos suffer two times higher rates of liver and stomach cancers—infection-related but preventable cancers—than their white peers. “Addressing this critical gap for Hispanic individuals in obtaining access to high-quality cancer prevention, early detection and treatment is going to be essential for mitigating the predicted growth in the cancer burden,” wrote Kimberly Miller, an ACS scientist, in the report. “In addition, more research is needed to assess not only the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the utilization of cancer care, but also the impact ...

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Roxy Harrison: Breast Cancer and Miracle Stories


Roxy Harrison breast cancer survivor featured

By Roxy Harrison Breast Cancer Survivor in San Antonio My name is Roxy Harrison and these are my miracle stories. My diagnosis story of both breast and ovarian cancer are a miracle! I noticed some discolouration under my right breast. I ignored it for a couple of months. It wouldn’t hurt but sometimes it would itch. I showed it to my primary care doctor. She said it’s probably just a heat rash, but if you’re concerned you can get a mammogram done. I was 37 so I wasn’t too worried. I did the mammogram, which I refer to as making pancakes. They call me back 2 weeks later that they want to do another one to compare. Why they would think something could change in 2 weeks is beyond me, but no problem. I do another one. Then they wanted me to do an ...

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Sobrevivientes de Cáncer Latinos, ¡Los Necesitamos!


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¿Es usted un sobreviviente de cáncer Latino? ¡Participe en el estudio Avanzando Caminos de UT Health San Antonio! Avanzando Caminos tiene como objetivo inscribir 1.500 sobrevivientes de cáncer Latinos en el Sur de Texas y 1.500 más en Miami para estudiar las influencias sociales, culturales, mentales, biológicas y médicas que afectan la vida después del cáncer. El estudio es patrocinado por el National Cancer Institute. En South Texas, el estudio está dirigido por la Dra. Amelie G. Ramirez de UT Health San Antonio y el Mays Cancer Center. “Con la ayuda de nuestros sobrevivientes de cáncer latinos, podemos ayudar en el futuro a que otros sobrevivientes de cáncer latinos sanen, se recuperen y reduzcan su riesgo de que el cáncer regrese”, dijo Ramirez, quien ...

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