The Impact of COVID-19 on Cancer Care: 2022 Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos


covid cancer care latinos

This is part of the "Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos: 2022 Conference Proceedings," which summarizes findings and discussions of the 2022 Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos Conference on Feb. 23-25, 2022, in San Antonio, Texas. COVID-19 Past, Present and Future Dr. Carlos Del Rio is Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Global Health, and Epidemiology. He is also Executive Associate Dean of Emory University School of Medicine, and President-Elect of the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA). The continued presence of COVID Dr. Del Rio began by pointing out that the COVID pandemic is not over, despite gains made over the past year. At the time of his presentation, there were still two million global cases diagnosed daily, and close to 10,000 global ...

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Latino Cancer Research Methodology: 2022 Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos


latina cancer research methodology

This is part of the "Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos: 2022 Conference Proceedings," which summarizes findings and discussions of the 2022 Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos Conference on Feb. 23-25, 2022, in San Antonio, Texas. Framing Latino Cancer Research and the Census Bureau Data That Enable It Mr. Robert L. Santos is the Director of the US Census Bureau, the first Latino to serve in that position. Lessons from a vibrant career Director Santos began by sharing wisdom gleaned from 40 years of research, including two ways in which it is important to think differently about research problems. First, researchers tend to emulate the methods and thought processes that they have been taught, but these conventional approaches may become self-propagating, and ...

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Addressing Systemic Inequities Behind Cancer Disparities: 2022 Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos


Latina mom and family Systemic Inequities cancer disparities

This is part of the "Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos: 2022 Conference Proceedings," which summarizes findings and discussions of the 2022 Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos Conference on Feb. 23-25, 2022, in San Antonio, Texas. Addressing Systemic Inequities and Structural Racism to Advance Health Equity for Latinos Dr. Marcella Nunez-Smith is an internal medicine physician, the Associate Dean for Health Equity Research at Yale School of Medicine, and the Associate Director for Community Outreach and Engagement at the Cancer Center. Dr. Nunez-Smith served as chair of the Presidential COVID-19 Health Equity Task Force, and is one of the nation's foremost experts on disparities in healthcare access. Health Disparities Affecting Marginalized Communities Dr. ...

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Introduction: 2022 Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos


latino family advancing the science of cancer in Latinos conference.jpg

This is part of the "Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos: 2022 Conference Proceedings," which summarizes findings and discussions of the 2022 Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos Conference on Feb. 23-25, 2022, in San Antonio, Texas. Healthcare inequity in the Latinx community The United States healthcare system is rife with systemic inequities affecting the Latinx community, the largest ethnic minority in the country with a population of 60.6 million [Estrada]. Health disparities include higher rates of infant mortality, stroke, cancer, heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, and COVID-19, and are often rooted in systemic racism and unconscious bias. [Webb Hooper, Duma] Latinx patients, especially those who are uncomfortable discussing care in English, are often stereotyped ...

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Building Collaboration for Action on Latino Cancer


Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos Building Collaboration for Action

U.S. Latinos face heavier burdens of stomach, liver, and cervical cancers, and worse outcomes for many cancers, than their White peers. But why? Unfortunately, many factors cause these disparities, from poverty and a lack of healthcare access to cultural barriers, acculturation, and genetic heritage. That's why it takes everyone working together to address Latino cancer. To this end, UT Health San Antonio has published a new open-access book, Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos: Building Collaboration for Action. The book is a collection of articles based on presentations at the 2nd biennial Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos conference on Feb. 26-28, 2020, in San Antonio, co-hosted by Mays Cancer Center and the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) ...

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Study: Processed Food May Increase Colorectal Cancer Risk


rejecting processed food

We’re all busy with the hustle and bustle of life. It’s tempting to grab fast food or buy ready-to-eat food to avoid cooking after a long day. But choosing those ultra-processed foods may cost you more than the money in your wallet. We already know that processed food is bad for your health, but an August 2022 study in The BMJ suggests that consuming ultra-processed food may increase risk for a serious disease – colorectal cancer. Let’s unpack these study results and what they mean for Latinos. What Are Ultra-Processed Foods? Ultra-processed foods – industrial ready-to-eat or ready-to-heat formulations made of little or no whole foods – now contribute 57% of total daily calories consumed by American adults, according to the study. These foods are usually rich ...

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‘Siento Que Me Ayudó, Porque Estoy Aquí’: Por qué Diana López Decidió Participar en un Estudio Clínico


Diana Lopez

Cuando se le preguntó sobre los logros en su vida, Diana López de San Antonio, Texas, no tuvo que pensar mucho en su respuesta. Sobrevivir al cáncer. López fue diagnosticada con cáncer de seno a los 42 años. Al igual que muchos de las personas que son diagnosticadas, fue un shock para López y sus seres queridos. "En ese momento tenía miedo porque piensas, te dicen: 'Tienes cáncer' y dices: 'Voy a morir'", dijo López. Con la ayuda de un estudio clínico – un estudio con pacientes que voluntariamente participan y que ayuda a los investigadores a aprender cómo reducir el progreso, controlar y tratar enfermedades como el cáncer – López se mantuvo fuerte y continuó luchando, sin importar el obstáculo. Un Diagnóstico de Cáncer y su Impacto López descubrió un ...

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Latinos, Act Against HPV-Associated Throat Cancer 


HPV throat cancer

HPV-associated throat cancer is on the rise in men. With the typical patient being 50 to 60 years old, Black and Latino men are dying from the disease at higher rates than their white counterparts, regardless of the stage of diagnosis or the type of treatment they receive. These staggering statistics come from a 2022 study published in the Annals of Cancer Epidemiology. Here’s what you need to know about HPV-associated throat cancer, and what you can do to help prevent it. What Causes HPV-Associated Throat Cancer?  HPV is short for human papillomavirus and is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. There are many types of HPVs, some of which can cause cancer later in life, according to ...

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