Analyzing the Cancer Moonshot’s Impact on Latinos


latino cancer moonshot

Created in 2016 by President Joe Biden, the Cancer Moonshot initiative aims to accelerate the rate of progress against cancer. Since then, the government program has accomplished a lot, including more than 2,000 scientific publications and 49 clinical trials – all to better understand how to treat and prevent cancer. President Biden has now reignited the Cancer Moonshot program and set a new national goal: cutting the death rate from cancer by at least 50% over the next 25 years, and improving the experience of people and their families living with and surviving cancer. But how will the Cancer Moonshot impact Latinos? The Latino Cancer Crisis Cancer is the #1 cause of death in Latinos. Latino cancer cases are expected to rise 142% in coming years. There are higher rates ...

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Watch Webinar: Ladies, Why Should You Get Screened for Cancer?



Latinas have lower cancer screening rates than their peers in South Texas and the nation. To find out why, we conducted a Zoom webinar — “Ladies, Why Should You Get Screened for Cancer?” — at 1 p.m. CT on Oct. 4, 2022. This webinar featured guest speakers and patient advocates to help health care professionals and the Latino public to help health care professionals and the Latino public understand the cultural and other barriers to cancer screening and demystify screening tests. Speakers also shared testimonials of their cancer journey and why they get screened. This is the sixth and final webinar of a series, “Let’s Address Health Equity Together.” The series is a collaboration of the Salud America! program at the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT ...

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Mind, Body, Spirit: A Holistic Approach to Help Latina Breast Cancer Survivors



Stress is a grim reality for many Latinas after breast cancer. Survivors deal with health, fitness, finance, discrimination, and social challenges that reduce their quality of life and boost their risk of new or recurring cancers. That is why Drs. Amelie G. Ramirez, Daniel Carlos Hughes, and Patricia Chalela at UT Health San Antonio will conduct a holistic intervention to improve Latina breast cancer survivors' physical, mental, and spiritual well-being, thanks to a new, three-year, $600,000 grant from Susan G. Komen. Researchers will recruit 70 breast cancer survivors, half of them Latinas. Over six months, they will get: therapeutic yoga with meditation optional tailored exercise and diet counseling real-time psycho-social support based on survivors’ motivational ...

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A Potential New Bladder Cancer Treatment May Benefit Latinos


bladder cancer

Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in men and causes about 17,100 deaths annually in the US. About 75% of bladder cancer cases are non-muscle invasive. This means that the cancer affects the tissue lining of the inner surface of the bladder, but not the bladder muscle. While this type of bladder cancer is treatable, one of the most effective treatments for this disease – a tuberculosis vaccine – causes intolerable side effects for up to 84% of patients, which can prevent treatment completion. When treatments fail, the bladder may have to be removed, reducing the patient’s quality of life. However, a modified tuberculosis vaccine developed by Jordi B. Torrelles, PhD, a professor at Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio, could help treat non-muscle ...

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Parents: Back-to-School Preparation Includes HPV Vaccination


HPV Vaccination

It’s that time of year again! Summer is ending and children are returning to school. Just as you prepare your child for the upcoming school year with school supplies, consider preparing them for a healthier life free from Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers with an HPV vaccine. Now is the perfect time to schedule your child’s annual wellness visit to receive the vaccine – before life gets hectic again. What is HPV? HPV is short for human papillomavirus. There are many types of HPVs, some of which can be sexually transmitted and cause cancer later in life, according to the American Cancer Society. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the US. HPV is so common that almost every sexually active person will get HPV at some point in their lives if ...

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¡Done Muestras Biológicas Hoy para Mejorar los Resultados de Salud de los Latinos!



¿Alguna vez ha querido ayudar a mejorar la salud de los latinos? ¡Ahora es su oportunidad! El Programa Científico All of Us de los National Institutes of Health está reclutando por lo menos a un millón de personas de diversas nacionalidades, para compartir información sobre su historia de salud y de su medio ambiente. La información recogida para la base de datos ayuda a los investigadores a aprender cómo la genética, el estilo de vida y nuestro medio ambiente afectan nuestra salud. Como parte del esfuerzo, los participantes donan muestras biológicas en la forma de una muestra de sangre o de saliva. Las muestras biológicas pueden ayudar a los investigadores a encontrar nuevas formas de prevenir, diagnosticar o tratar enfermedades, como el Alzheimer o el cáncer, ...

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Watch Webinar: Why Should I Think about Joining a Clinical Trial?



Clinical trials can have big benefits. They help researchers learn more to help slow, manage, and treat Alzheimer’s and cancer for ourselves and our abuelos, moms, dads, and others we love. So then why don't many Latinos join? To address this issue, you’re invited to join our Zoom webinar — Why Should I Think about Joining a Clinical Trial? — at 6 p.m. CT on Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2022. Webinar speakers Dr. Adolfo Diaz Duque of UT Health San Antonio and Dr. Bárbara Segarra-Vázquez of the University of Puerto Rico will help health care professionals and the Latino public understand clinical trial processes, explore trials as treatment options, and share testimonials of real Latinos who have benefited from trials. Panelists will also cover the barriers that prevent ...

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Vea el Seminario Web (Webinar): ¿Por Qué Debería Pensar en Participar en un Estudio Clínico?


Estudio Clínico

Los estudios clínicos pueden tener grandes beneficios. Ayudan a los investigadores a aprender más para ayudar a demorar, controlar y tratar el Alzheimer y el cáncer, para nosotros y nuestros abuelos, madres, padres y otras personas que amamos. Entonces, ¿por qué no muchos latinos participan en los estudios clínicos? Para abordar este problema, le invitamos a ver nuestro seminario web (Webinar) vía Zoom: ¿Por qué debería pensar en participar en un estudio clínico?  — a las 6 p.m. CT el miércoles 17 de agosto de 2022. Los panelistas del seminario web, el Dr. Adolfo Díaz Duque de UT Health San Antonio y la Dra. Bárbara Segarra-Vázquez de la Universidad de Puerto Rico ayudarán a los profesionales de salud y al público latino a entender los procesos de los ...

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Go into Bars, Clubs to Enroll Smokers in Quit-Smoking Services?!


Direct outreach in bars and clubs for quit smoking service 2

In the bar or club, it's easy to find people smoking and drinking. What would happen if health workers walked into these venues to ask cigarette smokers — face to face — to join a quit-smoking service on their phone? To find out, UT Health San Antonio researchers and an ad agency trained "street teams" to go into bars and clubs in San Antonio, Texas, to talk to patrons about joining Quitxt, a bilingual service that uses text messages to help young Latino adults quit smoking. Street teams talked with 3,923 people and enrolled 335 to Quitxt over 10 days in March 2020 before the COVID-19 pandemic halted work, according to a new study in the journal JMIR Formative Research. "Direct outreach in bars and clubs is a useful method for connecting young adult cigarette smokers with ...

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