Breast Cancer Risks Not Same for Hispanic Women



Some risk factors known to increase the odds of breast cancer in white women have less impact on Hispanic women, a new study shows, HealthDay reports. For instance, for postmenopausal women in the study, "recent hormone use and younger age at menarche did not appear to play as big a role in Hispanics." For younger women, family history and taller height, which normally slightly increase breast cancer risk, did not appear to be as strongly linked with breast cancer among Hispanics as among whites, according to the study published online April 26 in Cancer. Established risk factors accounted for up to 75 percent of breast cancers in younger white women, but just 36 percent in similar-aged Hispanic women. In older women, it was 62 percent in whites and just 7 percent in Hispanics. From ...

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Latino Cancer a Major Health Challenge



New study findings show an increased risk for cancer among Latino populations, but unique demographic characteristics suggest the problem may be worse than currently known. "As we see the Latino population age, we are going to see the current disparity in knowledge and outcomes become an explosion," said Amelie G. Ramirez, Dr.P.H., director of the Institute for Health Promotion Research at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, the team behind SaludToday. Ramirez received the fifth annual AACR-Minorities in Cancer Research Jane Cooke Wright Lectureship at the 101st AACR Annual Meeting 2010 and delivered a lecture, "Networks in Acción for Latino Cancer Research," on April 18. Currently, the rate of breast cancer among Latinas is lower than that in the general ...

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National Minority Cancer Awareness Week is April 18-24



April 18-24 is National Minority Cancer Awareness Week (NMCAW), which focuses on minority communities across the U.S. to bring awareness to the impact of cancer in these communities and provide resources to help eliminate disparities in diagnosis and treatment. About 1 in 2 Hispanic men and 1 in 3 Hispanic women will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime, and cancer is the second leading cause of death among Hispanics. For these reasons, cancer screening is extremely important. Latinas, for reasons to get your mammogram, watch our video here or below: Latino men need screening, too. Why? Watch this video here or below to find ...

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Leading the Fight Against Latino Cancer



Redes En Acción: The National Latino Cancer Research Network, which is funded by the National Cancer Institute and directed by Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez of SaludToday and the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, is celebrating 10 years of work to reduce Latino cancer. Redes has generated more than $200 million in funding for cancer research, trained more than 200 students and health professionals and conducted more than 2,000 community education events, bilingual materials and more. Watch a stirring video here or below about the program’s achievements among Latinos. Then join us! Also, watch the program’s six new PSAs touting Latino cancer prevention in English or Spanish here. To request broadcast-quality formats of the PSAs, email us at ...

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S.A. Teens Photograph Their Neighborhoods to Illustrate Tobacco Problems



SAN ANTONIO—Memorial High School student Victor Hernandez (at right) points to his photograph of a smoked cigarette butt lodged in the crack of a sidewalk. The photo caption starts: “Cigarettes get between everything.” “People might dream to be a doctor, lawyer – then cigarettes get introduced,” Victor said of the photo’s meaning. “With every cigarette it gets harder and harder to quit, you get closer to death. Your original dream goes away.” Victor is one of eight students from Edgewood Independent School District’s Kennedy and Memorial high schools who recently partook in a “Photovoice Smoke-Free” project, where students took photos and wrote captions to visually describe the problem of tobacco to policy- and decision-makers. Read more about the students and ...

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Latino Health News, Stories, Funding & Events



Latinos, check out the latest on Latino health news and stories in the Spring 2010 E-newsletter from the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, the team behind SaludToday. The newsletter features: S.A. Teens’ Artistic Photos Illustrate Tobacco Problems UTHSCSA Frontera de Salud Med Students Aid Valley Residents WATCH our PSAs on Latino Cancer, HPV Research funding opportunties Health disparities events Health disparities resources For this and much more, check out our new ...

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New U.S. Cancer Statistics; Broken Down by Racial/Ethnic Group



The 1999–2006 United States Cancer Statistics (USCS): Incidence and Mortality online report offers high-quality cancer incidence statistics for each state having high-quality cancer data. The report, jointly produced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in collaboration with the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, features information on more than one million invasive cancer cases diagnosed during 2006 among residents of 48 states, 6 metropolitan areas, and the District of Columbia. The data also are broken down by racial/ethnic group. At the right is a chart of the Top 10 cancer sites for Latino ...

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Redes En Acción: Making a Difference Against Latino Cancer



Redes En Acción: The National Latino Cancer Research Network, which is funded by the National Cancer Institute and directed by Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez of SaludToday and the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, is celebrating 10 years of work to reduce Latino cancer. Redes has generated more than $200 million in funding for cancer research, trained more than 200 students and health professionals and conducted more than 2,000 community education events, bilingual materials and more. Watch a stirring video here or below about the program’s achievements among Latinos. Then join us! Also, watch the program’s six new PSAs touting Latino cancer prevention in English or Spanish here. To request broadcast-quality formats of the PSAs, email us ...

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San Antonio Researcher Wins Grant to Increase Latina Cancer Screening



The Cancer Prevention and Research Institution of Texas (CPRIT) this week announced the $6.8 million to fund 12 new cancer prevention programs throughout Texas. One of the projects is led by Cynthia Mojica, PhD, a researcher at the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, the team behind SaludToday. Dr. Mojica's project, called Salud San Antonio!, will allow her to position four community health workers (promotoras) at four community health groups to deliver a cancer education and outreach program to increase screening rates and knowledge of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer among Latinas living in 10 zip codes in San Antonio's West and South sides. These zip codes have been identified by the San Antonio ...

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