The Scary Reason Latino Men Don’t Get the Best Prostate Cancer Treatment


latino man and nurse doctor pensive chart implicit bias

All of us have unconscious or involuntary stereotypes that affect our feelings and actions about other people based on characteristics such as race, ethnicity, age, and appearance. This is called "implicit bias." Implicit bias can harm relationships, policies, and even health. In fact, implicit bias is a big reason why Latino men are much less likely to receive optimal treatment for high-risk prostate cancer than White men, according to a new study in the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. This is bad news for Latinos. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among men of all races, including Latinos. The Prostate Cancer Disparity Between 2010-2014, researchers from UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Stanford Cancer ...

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Report: Immigrants Boost U.S. Economy


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The U.S. has more immigrants than any other country in the world, Pew Center Research reports. That's a good thing because immigrants boost the U.S. economy, according to a data report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. That finding contradicts stereotypes that immigrants take more from the government than they contribute, or steal jobs. These stereotypes are simply myths. How Immigrants Benefit the U.S. Economy When it comes to government benefits, immigrants contribute more in tax revenue than they take, according to the report. First-generation immigrants cost the government around $1,600 per person annually. That is more than native-born Americans. Second-generation immigrants, however, are the strongest economic and fiscal ...

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Honoring Latino Military Heroes on Veteran’s Day


Veterna's Day and Memorial Day Latino

Veteran's Day is on Nov. 11, 2018. Memorial Day is May 27, 2019. We at Salud America! are excited to honor all U.S. military personnel, including the Latinos, who have served our country. Latinos in the Military: History Latinos have a “proud and indeed enviable” record of military service that dates back all the way to the Civil War, according to a U.S. Army historical website. About 20,000 Latino serviceman and women participated in Operation Desert Shield/Storm in 1990-1991, 80,000 in the Vietnam War in 1959-1973, and more than 400,000 in World War II in 1939-1945. More than 40 Medals of Honor have been awarded to Latinos, according to the Department of Defense. “Whether their heritage can be traced to Spain, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Mexico, or one of dozens of other ...

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No More Us vs. Them: Trauma Training is Rebuilding Police-Community Trust



Police came to four-year-old Fatimah Muhammad’s house in Newark, N.J. (34% Latino), after an altercation between her parents. They came in with force. They had guns. They aggressively grabbed and body-slammed her father before taking him away, Muhammad said. “I was completely terrified,” she said. “Instead of feeling grateful.” As a kid, Muhammad didn’t have a name for some of the traumas that she and her neighborhood were experiencing, like police aggression, domestic violence, and mass incarceration. But she felt an “us vs. them” sense when it came to police. Years later, amid a wave of unlawful policing in Newark, Muhammad helped seize an opportunity to unite police and community to explore trauma and rebuild trust. ‘Unconstitutional’ Law ...

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#SaludTues Tweetchat 5/1: Racism and its Alarming Impact on Mental Health


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Racism can crush a person’s mental health. In fact, racism negatively affects mental health because it causes depression, anxiety, and heightened psychological stress in those who experience it, research shows. How can we help Latinos and other communities of color who experience racism every day? To celebrate Mental Health Month in May, let’s use #SaludTues on Tuesday, May 1, 2018, to tweet strategies to reduce racism, help those who experience racism, and boost mental health in communities of color! WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat: Racism and its Alarming Impact on Mental Health TIME/DATE: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT), Tuesday, May 1, 2018 WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludAmerica CO-HOSTS: Dr. Silvia L. Mazzula, executive director, Latina ...

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Apply for Up to $2.5 Million to Study How to Make Health a Shared Value


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Evidence for Action, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is seeking research proposals for up to $2.5 million to study innovative ways to "make health a shared value." This "shared value" involves individual, family, and community factors to renew a societal commitment to health and health equity. The new funding aims to understand what drives and enhances these values. Proposals, being sought for differing budgets of up to $2.5 million for up to 48 months of work, could use data from placed-based initiatives to see the effect on mindsets, sense of community, or civic engagement, and the impact on population health. "We seek evidence on the extent to which...mindsets and expectations, sense of community, and civic engagement can be changed through ...

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How to Rebuild Police-Community Trust by Tackling Trauma



Minorities don't trust police. Police don't trust minorities. You can see this dynamic in any viral video of police-associated violence across the nation. What is harder to see is how this "fraught relationship" impacts the mental, emotional, and behavioral health of both police officers and minorities like Latinos, according to a trustnottrauma.org report. That's why a new program is taking a new approach—trauma training—to rebuild police-community trust and relationships in Newark, N.J. Why Newark? Communities rely on police departments to "protect and serve." The police, in turn, rely on community support and cooperation. But this model doesn't always work in harmony, according to RAND. Newark (34% Latino) is a prime example. In 2011, New Jersey's American Civil ...

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Report: How to Promote Health Equity for Latinos


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Imagine a world where every person has the opportunity to attain full health potential—with no disadvantages due to race, money, etc. That is health equity. Unfortunately, Latinos and other people of color often struggle with health inequity as a result of poverty, structural racism, and discrimination. This causes gaps in how long Latinos live and how they struggle with disease and health, compared to their peers, according to the new Communities in Action: Pathways to Health report from thew National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The new report does have some good news: Communities have agency to promote health equity. However, community-based solutions are necessary but not sufficient. Supportive public and private policies at all levels and ...

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Poll: More than 3 in 4 Latinos Say Latinos Face Discrimination


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Three in four U.S. Latinos (78%) believe Latinos face discrimination in America today, compared to 92% of blacks and 55% of whites who say they face discrimination, according to a new poll. Who is doing the discriminating? Nearly half of Latinos (47%) believe personal prejudice is the bigger problem. A smaller amount (37%) say say discrimination based in laws and government policies is the bigger problem. About 14% say they're equally problematic. The data is from a new poll by National Public Radio (NPR), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. "Basically what we have found is that discrimination is a type of stressful life experience that has negative effects on health similar to other kinds of stressful experiences," ...

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