School Food Leader Goes Above and Beyond for School Nutrition

by

Change
Share On Social!

Heather Baril of North Attleboro’s school district in Massachusetts (4.3% Latino) is working to take school nutrition a step further with her new tagline for the school’s cafeterias: Feeding Healthy Futures.

Baril is further extending the healthy changes made by school service teams across the district that helped introduce meatless Mondays and homemade pizza days by introducing more cooking-from-scratch and community-wide efforts to push healthy eating into schools.

Baril hopes to implement school community gardens that will generate produce for school cafeterias and also work with local produce and chefs from local restaurants to create healthy and desirable dishes for students.

How is she planning to make so many healthy food changes in the district?

Reaching out to parents at school meeting with taste tests, Baril is working with parents and students letting them try new special breakfast menu items like the “swirl” sweet potato breakfast item or fresh yogurt and fruits alongside whole grain muffins for just a start.

Baril also hosts tasting sessions also for students at elementary schools and even allows students to get creative with new ideas for a monthly lunch menu.

The district also is partaking this week in the National School Breakfast week, which is a nationwide effort to encourage families to take advantage of healthy choices offered in school breakfasts.

All of these efforts are blossoming into a healthier food environment accepted by both students and parents at North Attleboro schools.

All kids deserve healthy foods at school, ensuring fresh fruits and vegetables are offered in a fun and creative way can help students be more interested in eating healthier and ensures a healthier future.

Latino kids need healthier school food environments and you can help!

Find out how to join the national movement to encourage a healthier school environment for Latino kids and all kids now.

By The Numbers By The Numbers

100

percent

of healthcare workers should focus on infection control

Share your thoughts