Webinar: How to Use Data to Promote Health Equity During COVID-19 Pandemic

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Webinar
Salud Equity Report Card Webinar
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Join our national webinar to find out how our Salud America! Health Equity Report Card can help you visualize and explore place-based health inequities in your county, and build a case toward solutions during these difficult coronavirus times.

The webinar, “How to Use Place-Based Data to Promote Health Equity During COVID-19 Pandemic,” is set for 2 p.m. ET Thursday, May 7, 2020.

Webinar speakers will explore:

  • How inequities in housing, transportation, poverty, healthcare, and access to healthy food and safe places to be active, contribute to disparities in infectious and chronic disease.
  • How you can use the local data, interactive maps, and comparative gauges in the Salud America! Health Equity Report Card to identify health inequity issues in your county.
  • Evidence-based research and emerging ways local communities are addressing health inequities.

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Learn About the Salud America! Health Equity Report Card

The Salud America! Health Equity Report Card can help you identify health inequity issues in the social and environmental conditions in which people in your county live, learn, work and play.

The report card doesn’t have data specifically on COVID-19.

But each report card does include local data, maps, and gauges on the social determinants that the pandemic is exacerbating in your community:

  • Housing: Cost-burdened, substandard, affordability, mortgage lending.
  • Schools: Graduation, reading proficiency, Head Start enrollment, etc.
  • Transportation: Commute times, car-less households, crash mortality.
  • Food: Food deserts, food access, food insecurity, fast food, grocery, SNAP.
  • Environment: Population density, tree canopy, air toxin exposure, etc.
  • Socioeconomic status: Income, poverty, no high-school diploma, violent crime.
  • Health care: Uninsured, access to primary, prenatal, mental health, and dental care.
  • Physical and mental health: Diabetes, heart disease, obesity, asthma, cancer, premature death, Alzheimer’s, depression, social-emotional support.
  • Comparisons of Latinos to non-Latino Whites: Poverty, obesity, median household income, high-school diplomas, lack of health insurance, teen birth rates, asthma, infant mortality, cancer mortality, and motor vehicle crash deaths.

Each Health Equity Report Card also contains links to evidence-based research and emerging ways local communities are addressing health inequities to help you build a case toward long-term solutions.

You can email report cards to local decision-makers, add data to your grants and projects, and more.

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Why We Need to Consider Place-Based Inequity During the Coronavirus Crisis

Beyond developing equitable practices in testing, tracking, and treating COVID-19, local and state leaders are also tasked with developing fixes to long-term social, economic, and health inequities.

Place-based inequities in housing, transportation, poverty, healthcare, and access to healthy food and safe places to be active, contribute to disparities in health and wealth, which are highlighted by the coronavirus.

“The failures of public policy and imagination have been stalking us for years, creating haves and have-nots: parents who don’t have paid sick leave from work (only 10 states and the District of Columbia mandate it); a lack of affordable childcare or sick child care; at least 28 million Americans living without insurance and nearly one-third of the population still underinsured; health protections that are not distributed evenly from region to region; and fear among undocumented immigrants regarding access to care,” writes Dr. Richard E. Besser, the president, and chief executive of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, in the Washington Post.

A singular focus on flattening the COVID-19 curve ignores the structural and systemic failures that created these inequities.

To overcome the additional social, economic, and health devastation of the coronavirus pandemic, we need to identify and address the root causes of place-based inequity.

In order to developing an efficient and effective emergency response to the novel coronavirus, we need to move beyond just social needs to also address systemic inequities.

Now more than ever, we need systems and tactics to make long-lasting changes in the health of our nation.

Local data in our Salud America! Health Equity Report Card will help show the way.

REGISTER FOR WEBINAR!

 

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84

percent

of Latino parents support public funding for afterschool programs.

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