Update: Coronavirus Case Rates and Death Rates for Latinos in the United States

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The coronavirus, COVID-19, can affect anyone.

But reports show Latinos and other people of color are disproportionately affected, amid worsening historical inequities.

What are the data really showing?

UPDATE 3/5/24: CDC releases new COVID-19 death rates by race/ethnicity.

COVID-19 Case Rates for Latinos

The U.S. population recently rose to 19.1% Latino.

Latino Latinas Hispanics walkinig and wearing face masks amid COVID-19 coronavirus pandemicAt the outset of the pandemic, COVID-19 disproportionately sickened Latinos. Variants like Delta and Omicron sparked case surges, too.

Latinos comprised 24.3% of COVID-19 cases in the United States, second only to Whites (53.8%), according to CDC data on health equity and cases on April 19, 2023. As of March 5, 2024, CDC is no longer maintaining incidence rates by race/ethnicity on this web page.

Several states experienced Latino coronavirus case disparities, too.

California is 39.3% Latino. But they made up 44.3% of COVID-19 cases as of May 9, 2023 (when the data stopped being maintained).

COVID-19 Death Rates for Latinos

14.8% of deaths from COVID-19 in the United States are among Latinos, as of Feb. 15, 2024, according to a CDC Data Tracker. That is a higher percentage than Blacks (13.6%) and lower than Whites (67.2%).

covid-19 death rates latinos race ethnicity cdc 3-5-24Picture1Total deaths by race/ethnicity, 2020-2024

  • Latinos: 173,088 have died due to COVID-19
  • Blacks: 159,760
  • Whites: 785,409
  • Asians: 36,716
  • American Indian/Alaska Native: 12,300
  • Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 2,342

“This is robbing the Hispanic community of a generation of mothers and fathers and brothers and sisters,” Dr. Peter Hotez of Baylor College of Medicine told TPR. Hotez and María Elena Bottazzi created the Corbevax vaccine for COVID-19.

COVID-19 Death Rates for Latinos by Age

Death rates by age and race/ethnicity was last updated on Sept. 27, 2023, on the CDC’s “Health Disparities: Race and Hispanic Origin” web page.

As of the last update:

Ages 0-24

  • Latinos: 29% distribution of COVID-19 deaths
  • Blacks: 24.7%
  • Whites: 37.8%
  • Asians: 3.3%
  • American Indian/Alaska Native: 2.1%
  • Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 0.7%

Ages 25-34

  • Latinos: 30.6% distribution of COVID-19 deaths
  • Blacks: 23.9%
  • Whites: 36.9%
  • Asians: 3.3%
  • American Indian/Alaska Native: 3.2%
  • Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 0.8%

Ages 35-44

  • Latinos: 32.1% distribution of COVID-19 deaths
  • Blacks: 21.8%
  • Whites: 38.8%
  • Asians: 2.9%
  • American Indian/Alaska Native: 2.6%
  • Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 0.7%

Ages 45-54

  • Latinos: 28.1% distribution of COVID-19 deaths
  • Blacks: 19.8%
  • Whites: 45.7%
  • Asians: 2.8%
  • American Indian/Alaska Native: 2%
  • Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 0.5%

Ages 54-64

  • Latinos: 21.3% distribution of COVID-19 deaths
  • Blacks: 18.7%
  • Whites: 54.4%
  • Asians: 2.8%
  • American Indian/Alaska Native: 1.6%
  • Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 0.3%

latina elder with face mask walking coronavirus covidAges 65-74

  • Latinos: 15.8% distribution of COVID-19 deaths
  • Blacks: 16.1%
  • Whites: 62.7%
  • Asians: 3.2%
  • American Indian/Alaska Native: 1.2%
  • Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 0.2%

Ages 75-84

  • Latinos: 11.9% distribution of COVID-19 deaths
  • Blacks: 11.7%
  • Whites: 71.8%
  • Asians: 3.1%
  • American Indian/Alaska Native: 0.8%
  • Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 0.1%

Ages 85+

  • Latinos: 8.8% distribution of COVID-19 deaths
  • Blacks: 8.5%
  • Whites: 78.5%
  • Asians: 3.4%
  • American Indian/Alaska Native: 0.4%
  • Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 0.1%

COVID-19 Death Rates for Latinos by State

CDC also archived its data on state distribution of COVID-19 deaths by race/ethnicity on Sept. 27, 2023.

As of April 26, 2023:

Alabama (4.4% of total state population is Latino)

  • 1.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 4.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Alaska (7.3% of total state population is Latino)

  • 3.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 8.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Arizona (31.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 27.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 31.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Arkansas (7.7% of total state population is Latino)

  • 3.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 9.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

California (39.3% of total state population is Latino)

  • 41.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 46% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Colorado (21.7% of total state population is Latino)

  • 22.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 22.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Connecticut (16.5% of total state population is Latino)

  • 10.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 19.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Delaware (9.5% of total state population is Latino)

  • 3.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 10.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

D.C. (11.3% of total state population is Latino)

  • 10.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 11.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Florida (26.1% of total state population is Latino)

  • 21.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 38.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Georgia (9.8% of total state population is Latino)

  • 4.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 11% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Hawaii (10.7% of total state population is Latino)

  • 7.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 10.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Idaho (12.8% of total state population is Latino)

  • 7.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 11% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Illinois (17.4% of total state population is Latino)

  • 13% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 24.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Indiana (7.1% of total state population is Latino)

  • 3.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 10.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Iowa (6.2% of total state population is Latino)

  • 2.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 7.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Kansas (12.1% of total state population is Latino)

  • 7.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 13.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Kentucky (3.8% of total state population is Latino)

  • 1.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 5.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Louisiana (5.2% of total state population is Latino)

  • 2.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 6.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Maine (1.7% of total state population is Latino)

  • 0.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 2.0% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Maryland (10.4% of total state population is Latino)

  • 6.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 13.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Massachusetts (12.3% of total state population is Latino)

  • 7.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 13.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Michigan (5.2% of total state population is Latino)

  • 3.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 5.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Minnesota (5.5% of total state population is Latino)

  • 2.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 6.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Mississippi (3.4% of total state population is Latino)

  • 1.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 3.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Missouri (4.3% of total state population is Latino)

  • 2.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 4.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Montana (4.1% of total state population is Latino)

  • 2.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Nebraska (11.2% of total state population is Latino)

  • 5.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 12.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Nevada (29% of total state population is Latino)

  • 20.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 31.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

New Hampshire (3.9% of total state population is Latino)

  • 2.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 5.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

New Jersey (20.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 17.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 22.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

New Mexico (49.1% of total state population is Latino)

  • 42.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 50.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

New York (19.3% of total state population is Latino)

  • 9.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 16.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

North Carolina (9.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 4.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 11.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

North Dakota (4.1% of total state population is Latino)

  • 2.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 3.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Ohio (3.9% of total state population is Latino)

  • 1.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 5.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Oklahoma (10.9% of total state population is Latino)

  • 5.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 15.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Oregon (13.3% of total state population is Latino)

  • 7.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 13.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Pennsylvania (7.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 3.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 9.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Rhode Island (15.9% of total state population is Latino)

  • 7.7% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 23.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

South Carolina (5.8% of total state population is Latino)

  • 2.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 6.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

South Dakota (4.2% of total state population is Latino)

  • 1.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 5.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Tennessee (5.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 2.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 7.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Texas (39.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 39.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 44.6% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Utah (14.2% of total state population is Latino)

  • 12.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 17.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Vermont (2% of total state population is Latino)

  • 0% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 2.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Virginia (9.6% of total state population is Latino)

  • 4.9% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 12.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Washington (12.9% of total state population is Latino)

  • 8.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 11.1% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

West Virginia (1.7% of total state population is Latino)

  • 0.5% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 1.8% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Wisconsin (6.9% of total state population is Latino)

  • 4.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 11.4% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

Wyoming (10.1% of total state population is Latino)

  • 8.2% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths.
  • 11.3% Latino distribution of COVID-19 deaths, when weighted for geographic outbreak areas.

That means 40 of 50 reporting states and D.C. have an over-representation of Latino deaths, according to the weighted CDC data.

COVID-19 Case and Death Data in 5 U.S. Cities with Largest Latino Populations

Here is a look at COVID-19 rates by race/ethnicity in the most Latino cities.

1. New York City

29.1% of the total population is Latino.

Latinos have the largest number of cases per 100,000 people due to COVID-19.

COVID-19 Cumulative Case Rate per 100,000 People

  • Hispanics/Latinos: 39,325
  • Asians: 33,468
  • Whites: 32,894
  • Blacks: 31,155

COVID-19 Cumulative Hospitalization Rate per 100,000 People

  • Hispanics/Latinos: 2,845
  • Asians: 1,508
  • Whites: 1,693
  • Blacks: 2,961

Source: NYC Health, accessed 3/5/24 via the “Totals” tab.

2. Los Angeles County (Home of Los Angeles)

48.6% of the total population is Latino.

Latinos currently comprise over half of the county’s COVID-19 cases by race/ethnicity:

  • Hispanics/Latinos: 1,553,191
  • Blacks: 196,852
  • Whites: 517,105
  • Asians: 275,605
  • American Indian/Alaska Native: 6,968
  • Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 18,281

Source: County of Los Angeles Public Health, as of Feb. 29, 2024 (accessed March 5, 2024).

3. City of Houston

44.8% of the total population is Latino.

houston covid-19 data as of 3-5-24Latinos comprised a large percentage of COVID-19 cases at the outset of the pandemic, but their share of cases has declined over time.

% of Weekly Total COVID-19 Cases by Race/Ethnicity

  • Hispanics/Latinos: 14.6%
  • Blacks: 18.8%
  • Whites: 35.4%
  • Asians: 6.3%
  • Other: 25%

Source: Harris County data, as of March 1, 2024 (accessed March 5, 2024).

4. Bexar County (Home of San Antonio)

60% of the total population is Latino.

70% of COVID-19 cases were Latino, as of March 4, 2022.

“Among cases for whom race/ethnicity data are available, Hispanic individuals continue to make up the majority of total COVID-19 cases. Although Hispanics make up 60% of the Bexar County population, they represent 70% of cases with known race/ethnicity,” according to the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District’s latest monthly epidemiological report.

Source: San Antonio Metropolitan Health District Monthly Epidemiological Report, last available 3/4/22. As of 1/20/23, the district is no longer reporting epidemiological reports and school case numbers.

5. City of Chicago

29% of the total population is Latino.

Most COVID-19 cases, cumulatively from 2020 to 2024, are among Latinos.

Number of COVID-19 cases, cumulatively from 2020 to 2024:

  • Hispanics/Latinos: 225,798
  • Blacks: 195,841
  • Whites: 210,834
  • Asians:37,483
  • Other:42,554
  • Unknown: 106,437

Source: Chicago.gov, as of Feb. 23, 2024 (accessed March 5, 2024).

Latino ‘Excess Deaths’ Far Exceed Initial Estimates during COVID-19 Pandemic

Annually, CDC researchers compile and analyze data to predict the number of deaths that will occur in the coming year.

latina mom and daughter face masks covid uplift latinosThe number of mortalities that go over this initial estimate, or “the difference between the observed numbers of deaths in specific time periods and expected numbers of deaths in the same time periods,” are known as excess deaths.

Looking at deaths in 2020 compared with predicted deaths, researchers found that U.S. Latinos suffered double the excess deaths per 100,000 people than their white peers.

With COVID-19 as a cause, excess deaths per 100,000 persons from March to December 2020 among Blacks and Latinos were more than double those among whites

“There were profound racial/ethnic disparities in excess deaths in the United States in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in rapid increases in racial/ethnic disparities in all-cause mortality between 2019 and 2020,” according to an October 2021 study published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

What Does All This Coronavirus Case and Death Data Really Mean?

It means Latino faced a heavy burden of COVID-19.

Latinos are highly exposed to the virus as essential workers.

Also, this population suffers from inequities in income, health care access, access to food, and more. Poverty rates also play a large role, as do fears of impact on daily life.

Latino undocumented immigrants often don’t benefit from unemployment aid or stimulus checks, either.

But we can overcome our biases.

We also need policies to address social support for Latinos in poverty, such as these 10 strategies.

“Capable and healthy adults are the foundation of any well-functioning society,” said Greg Duncan of University of California, Irvine, in a news release. “But because millions of American children are in families living below the poverty line, this future is not as secure as it could be.”

Latinos Getting Vaccinated for COVID-19, But Some Still Resist Vaccines

Initially in the pandemic, Latinos made up a very low percentage of those getting a vaccine, despite being disproportionately hurt by COVID-19.

Lack of access and vaccine hesitancy, amid historic systemic discrimination and bias, might be part of the reason. Learn five important ways to build trust and address vaccine hesitancy.

However, in between July and September 2021, data show that more and more Latinos are getting vaccinated, even surpassing the number for Black and white people, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

To help move Latinos from vaccine hesitancy to vaccine confidence, Salud America! is uplifting the stories of real Latinos who overcame misinformation, got the COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, Johnson & Johnson), reconnected with family, and helped end the pandemic.

For example, take Rosa Herrera.

Rosa read on Facebook that the COVID-19 vaccine would inject her with a microchip.

rosa SOCIAL GRAPHIC 3What changed her heart? After doing research and learning that the vaccine is safe, she ultimately decided to get a vaccine.

She’s glad she did.

“I’m able to see my grandkids and my kids here. It gives you more freedom,” Herrera said.

SHARE VACCINE CONFIDENCE STORIES

What Can You Do?

Check out how coronavirus is impacting Latinos. Here are 19 ways to push for health equity amid coronavirus.

You can also get a “Health Equity Report Card” for your area!

Select your county name and get a customized Health Equity Report Card by Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio. You will see how your area stacks up in housing, transit, poverty, health care, healthy food, and other health equity issues compared to the rest of your state and nation.

Also, take a personal step to ensure the safety of our communities.

See and share our Salud America!Juntos, We Can Stop COVID-19” digital communication campaign in English or Spanish to help Latino families and workers take action to slow the spread of coronavirus, including getting the vaccine (when available).

The #JuntosStopCovid campaign features culturally relevant fact sheets, infographics, and video role model stories to encourage Latinos to change their public health behaviors.

share the campaign in ENGLISH!

share the campaign in SPANISH!

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Expected rise in Latino cancer cases in coming years

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One Response to “Study: Latino Mortality Advantage Disappeared amid COVID-19”

  1. Sister Nancy Carol Traeger, SSND.

    As I read the articles, I was wondering IF some classes/workshops on budgeting would be helpful for the Latino families….Along with that, “throw in” some helps in where/how to shop for healthy foods, getting politically involved via the petitions that come our way each day (SNAP and WIC) These are essential programs and getting info regarding how to make one’s voice heard about these programs, especially around Congressional budgeting. It’s something I do as much as I can in order to help with keeping these programs going and improving. Thank you for the info and the opportunity to comment on these important issues for ALL families. As a former director of a homeless shelter for women and children, I had quite an education around the county-side of getting help, and learning to be patient while having to wait. I think shame is also a detriment for folks, having to get “charity” as it’s sometimes called.