#SaludTues Tweetchat 1p ET 10/27/15: “Fall Celebrations & Candy Alternatives”



Latino kids are marketed to about candy and junk food especially during fall and Halloween celebrations like Dia de los Muertos. These sugary beverages and sweets do not produce a culture of health and well being, but are tempting during the holidays. Latino kids are more at risk for diabetes and obesity. What can we do? Let’s use #SaludTues to tweet information, resources, and tips that can help Latinos kids and moms reduce their risk of sugar and it’s dangers. Follow #SaludTues to join the conversation. WHAT: #SaludTues Tweetchat:  “Fall Celebrations & Candy Alternatives” DATE: Tuesday, October 27, 2015 TIME: 1-2 p.m. ET (Noon-1 p.m. CT) WHERE: On Twitter with hashtag #SaludTues HOST: @SaludToday CO-HOSTS: Center for Science in the Public Interest CSPI ...

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Study: Latinas More Likely To Receive Poor Breast Cancer Treatment



Latinas are more likely to receive poor treatment regardless of tumor type, Latina Magazine reports. The study, published in the journal Cancer, Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, “looked at data from 100,000 American women, including their demographics, stage of disease, tumor grade and size, treatment and health insurance status.” According to the study, 20 to 40 percent of Latinas were more likely to receive “substandard care.“ Latinas have a 30 to 40 percent higher chance to be diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and “were more likely to have large tumors.” Researchers aren’t sure why there’s a gap in quality of treatment Latinas receive, but believe socioeconomic factors play a role as well as language ...

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Nielsen Report: Latinos are Getting Healthier & Wealthier



According to the latest Nielsen's Hispanic Consumer Report, Latinos are living longer and have more disposable income than in the past. The report shows: Hispanics have lower mortality rates in seven out of the 10 leading causes of death in the U.S. In the first few years after immigrating to the U.S., Hispanics also tend to have lower smoking rates, better diet and better general health. This is translating to Hispanics living longer and having healthier, more active lives. Today Hispanic-Americans life expectancy is 83.5 years compared to 78.7 for non-Hispanic Whites. This means more buying and viewing power, for longer. The report also found 40 percent of Latinos over the age of 50 live in multi-generational households compared to just over a fifth of the general U.S. ...

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Health Insurance for All Children Under 19, in California



All children under 19 years old will be eligible for the state’s health insurance in California (Medi-Cal), Univision Noticias reports. The law signed by Gov. Jerry Brown will potentially  benefit 200,000 undocumented children who currently have access to a limited state health insurance. “In the middle of the national conversation on immigration, sometimes negative, we congratulate Governor and the legislature for recognizing the contributions of undocumented Californians and their human right to health access,” Daniel Zingale, vice president of The California Endowment told Univision. Currently, most undocumented migrants have limited access to the state’s version of Medicaid (Medi-Cal). The new law will give full health benefits to undocumented children in ...

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New Anti-Smoking Campaign Targets Minorities of Color



The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) is launching “Fresh Empire” a hip-hop themed anti-tobacco campaign targeted at Latinos and Blacks. “Unfortunately, the health burdens of tobacco use disproportionately affect minority teens – particularly African American and Hispanic youth,” said Jonca Bull, M.D., the FDA’s Assistant Commissioner for Minority Health in a press release. "The 'Fresh Empire' campaign will help reach teens at a key point in their lives when experimenting with smoking can lead to addiction." The “Fresh Start” campaign will target youth ages 12-17 with interactive content, songs and videos by up and coming hip hop artists. "We know from our research that remaining in control is an important pillar of hip-hop culture. But smoking represents a ...

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Julie La Fuente Louviere: Latina Cancer Survivor



At age 29 Julie La  Fuente Louviere was in perfect shape and training for a triathlon in her native Puerto Rico.  “I found a knot near my collarbone, which I believed was nothing, but my husband made me get it checked out. The diagnosis was breast cancer.” La Fuente says. After going through chemotherapy and all the side effects related to it, Julie was cancer free. Four years later and while she was pregnant cancer came back. “But the cancer came back, now in my liver and bones. The doctors recommended termination of my pregnancy because they said it would be easier to treat. For me that was not an option.” On Valentine ’s Day in 1998 Julie gave birth to her second daughter and a few days later she found out from her doctors that she only had two months left to live. ...

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Study: Latinos Spend More Time Traveling To and Waiting for Medical Care



A recent study by the University Of Pittsburgh School Of Medicine found Latinos and other minorities spend more time traveling to and waiting for medical care, Fox Health reports. For the study, researchers used a sample of 4,000 people who reported their wait times and the travel time to the clinics. "Unfortunately, there are so many disparities in health care access and health outcomes already identified in our health care system that I don't think these results are necessarily surprising," said Dr. Kristin N. Ray of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, who worked on the study. The study found Latino patients spent an average 105 minutes waiting compared to 80 minutes of wait time among Whites non-Hispanics. "We have long known that there are disparities in ...

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Genetic Counseling: A Rarity Among U.S.Women Tested for BRCA 1 and BRCA 2



According to a new study most women in  the U.S. sent by their doctors to be tested for BRCA1 and BRCA 2, two genes “that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer” a leading cause of cancer death in Hispanic women, never met with a counselor beforehand, Reuters reports. "There are very clear and consistent guidelines that people should receive genetic counseling before genetic testing for cancer susceptibility," said Dr. Rebecca Sutphen, the study's senior author from the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine in Tampa. Part of the problem, according to researchers is that many doctors are not recommending patients to see a genetic counselor and today there are cheaper and more accessible genetic test options. “Genetic counselors typically explain ...

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Meg Reyes: Latina Cancer Survivor



Meg Reyes, was diagnosed with breast cancer at the early age of 33. “I was only required to have a lumpectomy,” she says, “but because of the tumor size my doctors were very aggressive in my treatment and removed 16 lymph nodes,” With the support of her family and co-workers Megan survived breast cancer. 10+ years after, she’s an unofficial counselor for newly diagnosed breast cancer patients, she has lost 150 pounds, has lived in Germany and England and has hosted a Japanese exchange student. [Survivorship means]“living life even after something challenging happened in your life experience. It doesn’t have to be cancer, it can be anything that you survived and how you deal with those adverse action,” Reyes said. Read Meg’s full story on Redes en ...

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